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Full text of "Bethany College Bulletin 1944-48"

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CATALOGUE NUMBER 
1944- 1945 



BETHANY • WEST VIRGINIA 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Vol. XXXVII March, 1944 No. 3 

Entered as second class matter at Bethany Post Office, Bethany, W.Va. 

Published every month except July and August by Bethany College, Bethany, W.Va. 



CATALOGUE 

i 9 4 4 - i 9 4 5 



Statement 

of 

History, Purpose, and Program 

at 

Bethany College 
Bethany, West Virginia 

with 

Curricular Announcements 

for 

i 944-1 945 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The information contained in this catalogue is presented with 
the understanding that courses, teaching personnel, require- 
ments, schedules of opening and closing of sessions, holidays, 
expenses, etc., will be subject to whatever revisions the pres- 
ent war emergency and post war problems may make neces- 
sary or appropriate. 



si**. iff 

m4-4f 43473 



CONTENTS 

Academic Recognition 3 

Calendar 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

Officers of Administration 8 

Faculty of Instruction 9 

Purpose and History 18 

Admission and Induction 22 

Expenses 28 

Scholarships and Financial Aids . . 35 

Graduation and Honors 42 

Educational Program 47 

Occupational Preparation 52 

Navy V-12 Program $3 

Departments of Instruction 66 

Equipment and Resources 123 

General Information 133 

Degrees Conferred 147 

Roster of Students 150 

Alumni Association of Bethany College 171 

Index 172 



ACADEMIC RECOGNITION 

Bethany College is on the approved list of colleges of the 
Association of American Universities. By virtue of this ap- 
proval the baccalaureate degree from Bethany College is 
recognized for admission to graduate study in this coun- 
try and abroad. 

Bethany College is accredited by the North Central As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools as a degree 
granting institution. 

Bethany College is a member in good standing of the 
Association of American Colleges and the American Coun- 
cil on Education. 

Bethany College is recognized by various state depart- 
ments of education as an institution for the training of 
teachers, and is in good standing with the American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors. 

Women graduates of Bethany College are eligible to 
membership in the American Association of University 
Women. Membership in the American Association carries 
with it membership in the International Federation of Uni- 
versity Women. 

Bethany College is a member of the Board of Higher 
Education of Disciples of Christ. 

Bethany College is also a member of the Association of 
Liberal Arts Colleges of Western Pennsylvania. 



i 944 





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AUGUST 

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SEPTEMBER 

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CALENDAR 

Summer Semester 
1944 

July 5, Wednesday — Registration for Summer Semester 

July $-6, Wednesday and Thursday — Freshman Days 

July 6, Thursday — Classes begin 

August 31, Thursday — Mid-semester grade reports 

October 4, Wednesday — Reading period for seniors begins 

October 16 to 18, Monday to Wednesday — Senior comprehensive examinations 

October 22, Sunday — Graduation exercises 

October 21 to 25, Saturday to Wednesday — Final examinations 

Winter Semester 

November 1 and 2, Wednesday and Thursday — Freshman Days 

November 2, Thursday — Registration for Winter Semester 

November 3, Friday — Classes begin 

November 23, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day, not a college holiday 

December 22, Friday — Mid-semester grade reports 

December 22, Friday — 3:00 p.m., Christmas recess begins 

1945 

January 1, Monday — 8:00 a.m., Christmas recess ends 

January 31, Wednesday — Reading period for seniors begins 

February 12 to 14, Monday to Wednesday — Senior comprehensive examinations 

February 18, Sunday — Graduation exercises 

February 21 to 24, Wednesday to Saturday — Final examinations 

Spring Semester 

March 1, Thursday — Registration for Spring Semester 

March 2, Friday — Classes begin 

April 27, Friday — Mid-semester grade reports 

May 30, Wednesday — Senior reading period begins 

June 11 to 13, Monday to Wednesday — Senior Comprehensive Examinations 

June 17, to Sunday — Annual Commencement, graduation exercises 

June 18 to 21, Monday to Thursday — Final examinations 

Summer Semester 

July 2, Monday — Summer semester begins 

In cooperation with the Navy V-12 Training Program, Bethany College is operating on 
a program of three terms of 16 weeks each. For convenience in evaluation of credit these 
terms are designated as semesters and credit is listed in semester hours. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1947 

W. H. Fields 843 Main Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

-W;- -W-. - V-an Horn Shelby, Ohio 

*Arcyle Campbell Box D, San Clemen te, California 

I W. S. Wilkin Wellsburg, W.Va. 

F. O. Carfer 50 Lincoln Blvd., Kenmore, N.Y. 

, Dr. R. R. Renner 12900 Euclid Ave., E. Cleveland, Ohio 

H. O. Evans Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sidney C. Porter Box 765, East Liverpool, Ohio 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1946 

Hon. Bennett Champ Clark Senate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 

» J. C. Morris Shelby, Ohio 

Alfred E. Wright 302 Fayette Title and Trust Bldg., Uniontown, Pa. 

• Dr. J. Parke McMullen Wellsburg, W.Va. 

1 Frank M. Hesse 37 Woodland Drive, Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 

1 Dr. Russell B. Bailey Wheeling Clinic, Wheeling, W.Va. 

;. George J. Barthold. . . .Miners & Mechanics Savings & Trust Co., Steubenville, Ohio 
k John W. Love 340 Allison Avenue, Washington, Pa. 

Lt. Robert McKinney 17 DeHart Street, Morristown, N.J. 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1945 

Thomas W. Phillips, Jr Butler, Pa. 

John M. Smith 1321 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 

R. A. Balderson Farmers Nat'l Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John Marshall Union Trust Bldg., Washington, D.C. 

Robert D. Hurl Shelby, Ohio 

Daniel F. Mullane 202 Kenneth Avenue, Greensburg, Pa. 

Austin V. Wood Board of Trade Bldg., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Thomas E. Millsop Weirton Steel Company, Weirton, W.Va. 

* Deceased August 12, 1944 

l Faculty Representative for 1944-1945: John J. Knight 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

W. S. Wilkin, Chairman 

W. H. Cramblet, President and Treasurer 

N. W. Evans, Secretary 

COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Executive: 

Mr. Wilkin, Dr. McMullen, Mr. Phillips, Mtv~Vaft»He?n, Mr. Wright, Mr. Hesse 
Mr. Porter, Mr. Mullane, Mr. Hurl. 
Mr. Kirkpatrick, Secretary 

L- L I . . . 

Alumni Cooperation: 

Mr. Carfer, Mr. Smith, Mr. Hesse, Mr. Porter. 

Buildings and Grounds: 

Mr. Phillips, Mr. Hurl, Mr. Porter, Mr. Barthold, Mr. Millsop. 

Church Cooperation: 

Mr. Morris, Mr. Carfer, Mr. Love. 

Finance and Budget 

Dr. McMullen, Mr. Wright, Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Mullane. 

Investment: 

Mr. Wright, President Cramblet. 

Library: 

Dr. Renner, Mr. Evans, Mr. Wood. 

Nominations: 

Mr. Marshall, Mr. Morris, Dr. Mullen. 

Student Welfare: 

Mr. Hurl, Mr. Marshall, Dr. Renner, Mr. Mullane. 

Post War Planning: 

Mr. Mullane, Mr. Porter, Dr. Bailey, Mr. Hurl, Mr. Hesse, Mr. Wright. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet President of the College 

William Kirk Woolery Provost 

Bernal Robinson Weimer Dean of the Faculty 

*Forrest Hunter Kirkpatrick Dean of Students 

Florence Marian Hoagland Academic Advisor for Women 

Edgar Hugh Behymer Librarian 

Newton Wallace Evans Bursar 

George Carl Hettler Executive Secretary 

Charles Clifford Barlow Director of Admissions 

Edgar Wade Mahan, M.D College Physician 

Margaret Carrigan Social Director 

Jay Moore Potter - Coordinator, Navy V-12 Program 

* On leave of absence, in interest of War Production, for personnel work with Radio 
Corporation of America. 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION* 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet, President of the College on the M. M. Cochran Foundation 
and Professor of Mathematics. (Professor 1917; President 1934) 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University. 



Jean Corrodi Moos, Professor-Emeritus of Music. (1 897-1934) 

College of Music, Zurich; Royal Conservatory of Music, Leipsig; A.M., Mus.D., 
Bethany College; Oberlin College; Columbia University. 

Henry Newton Miller, Professor-Emeritus of Bible School Pedagogy on the Herbert 
Moninger Foundation. (19 14-1937) 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; D.D., Bethany College. 

Ebenezer Lee Perry, Professor-Emeritus of Latin. (1 908-1 939) 

A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; A.M., Columbia University; Litt. D., 
Bethany College. 



Pearl Mahaffey, Prof essor of Modern Languages. (1908) 

A.B., Miami University; University of California; A.M., Columbia University; Uni- 
versity of Grenoble; McGill University; University of Paris; Harvard University; 
National University of Mexico. 

Frank Roy Gay, Professor of Classics. (1910) 

A.B., A.M., Drake University; University of Virginia; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Andrew Leitch, Sarah B. Cochran Professor of Psychology. (1920) 

A.B., A.M., Butler College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; Columbia University; Uni- 
versity of Chicago; University of Pennsylvania; Harvard University. 

William Kirk Woolery, Provost and George T. Oliver Professor of History and Political 
Science. (1921) 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., University of California; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

Bernal Robinson Weimer, Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Biology. (1921) 
A.B., A.M., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Irvin Taylor Green, Professor of New Testament and Church History. (1921) 

A.B., Transylvania College; A.M., B.D., Bethany College; University of Chicago. 



* The names are arranged in order of faculty rank and seniority of appointment. The 
date in parentheses indicates first appointment to this faculty. 



Forrest H. Kirkpatrick, Dean of Students and Prof essor of Education. (1927) 

A.B., Bethany College; University of Dijon; A.M., Columbia University; University 
of Pittsburgh; Professional diploma as clinical psychologist from Columbia Univer- 
sity; University of London. 

Emmett Ephriam Roberts, Prof essor of English. (1928) 

A.B., Ohio University; A.M., Ohio State University; New York University. 

2 Osborne Booth, T. W. Phillips Prof essor of Old Testament. (1929) 

A.B., Hiram College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. 

3 Henry Donald Dawson, Professor of Chemistry. (1930) 

B.S., Denison University; M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

John J. Knight, Prof essor of Physical Education. (1930) 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College; University of Michigan; Ohio State University. 

, John Stanley Valentine Allen, Professor of Physics. (1933) 
B.Eng., M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Charles Rush Carter, Professor of Music. (1934) 

Combs Conservatory, Temple University; B.S. in Ed., A.M., New York University; 
Juilliard School of Music. 

Florence Marian Hoagland, Academic Adviser for Women and Professor of English. 

(1936) 
A.B., Cornell University; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., Cornell University; 
University of Cambridge. 

1 Reuben Hamilton Eliassen, Professor of Education. (1936) 

A.B., St. Olaf College; University of Minnesota; A.M., Columbia University; Stan- 
ford University; University of Chicago; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Dwight Eshelman Stevenson, Professor of Religion and Philosophy. (1936) 
A.B., Bethany College; B.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. 

4 William Berle Shaffer, Associate Professor of Economics. (1942) 
A.B., M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ohio State University. 

George W. Bennett, Associate Professor of Chemistry. (1943) 

B.S., Denison University; M.S., Washington and Jefferson College; Ph.D., Ohio State 

University. 

Franklin Allen Simmons, Associate Professor of Mathematics. (1943) 
B.S., C.E., Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 



1 On leave of absence, in interest of war production, for personnel work with Radio 
Corporation of America. 

2 With armed forces of the United States. 
8 Resigned as of February, 1944. 

4 Resigned as of October, 1943. 



Burton H. Gildersleeve, Associate Professor of Economics. (1944) 

B.S., State University of Iowa; M.B.A., New York University; Cornell University; 
Ohio State University. 

Erwin C. Paustian, Associate Professor of Sociology. (1944) 

B.A., Central Wesleyan College; M.A., Northwestern University; University of Chi- 
cago; University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Wilbur John Sumpstine, Assistant Prof essor of Biology and Geology. (1925) 

B.S., Bethany College; West Virginia University; M.S., University of Chicago; Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. 

Chandler Shaw, Assistant Professor of History. (1935) 

A.B., Rollins College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; American Academy 
in Rome; Royal University, Perugia, Italy. 

Earl D. McKenzie, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. (1937) 

A.B., Brown University; A.M., Columbia University; University of Frankfurt am 
Main; Yale University; University of Pittsburgh. 

Charles Clifford Barlow, Director of Admissions with rank of Assistant Professor. (1938) 
A.B., Illinois College; University of Illinois; Litt.M., University of Pittsburgh. 

Margaret Carrigan, Social Director and Assistant Prof essor of English. (1939) 

A.B., Columbia University; A.M., Syracuse University; Columbia University; Cornell 
University. 

E. Hugh Behymer, Librarian with rank of Assistant Professor. (1941) 

A.B., Indiana University; B.L.S., University of Michigan; A.M., University of Chi- 
cago. 

x Elizabeth M. Lewis, Assistant Professor of Business Administration. (1943) 

B.Ed., Illinois State Normal University; M.S., University of Illinois; University of 
Chicago. 

2 James Wagner Alexander, Instructor in English. (1940) 

A.B., A.M., University of Georgia; University of Perugia; University of Padua; Uni- 
versity of Grenoble; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Louise Elizabeth Gettys, Instructor in Mathematics and Associate in Guidance and Per- 
sonnel. (1941) 
A.B., Bethany College; Columbia University. 

4 Romain G. Greene, Instructor in English. (1942) 

B.A., State University of Iowa; M.A., Drake University. 

Arnold Nicholsen, Instructor in Physical Education. (1942) 
B.S., M.S., University of Alabama. 

1 Resigned as of September, 1943. 

2 With Armed Forces of the United States. 

3 Resigned as of June, 1944. 

4 Resigned as of October, 1943. 



Mary Flint Syer, Instructor in Sociology. (1942) 

B.Ph., M.A., Northwestern University; London School of Economics. 

Pauline Eley, Instructor in Secretarial Training. (1942) 

A.B., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; Bowling Green College of Commerce. 

j Julia Racine Spicer, Instructor in Spanish. (1943) 

A.B., B.S., in Educ, M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of California; 
University of Iowa; National University of Mexico. 

Grace Benedict, Instructor in Physical Education. (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Kjeorge Weirich Callendine, Jr., Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1943) 
B.S., Bethany College. 

2 Joseph Churchman, Instructor in Physical Education. (1943) 

A.B., West Liberty State College; Litt.M., University of Pittsburgh. 

John Shields Cluss, Instructor in Mathematics. (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

3 Robert E. Early, Part-time Instructor in Old Testament. (1943) 
A.B., Denison University; B.D., Yale University. 

4 Harry L. Hickman, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1943) 

A.B., Bethany College; Johns Hopkins University; Columbia University. 

Jay Moore Potter, Instructor in Education. (1943) 

A.B., Bethany College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; University of West Virginia. 

Hilda Sarver, Instructor in Chemistry. (1943) 

B.S., Bethany College; Iowa State University. 

8 H. Craig Sipe, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1943) 

A.B., Bethany College; M.S., University of Virginia; Duke University. 

Bradford Tye, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1943) 

B.S., Alma White College; Rutgers University; M.S., New York University. 

•Fa ye Colegrove, Instructor in Physical Education. (1943) 

B.S., Ottawa University; M.A., Columbia University; University of Wisconsin. 

8 Harry W. Lohr, Instructor in Economics. (1943) 
B.S., Kent State University. 

6 Nina Moore, Part-time Instructor in Mathematics. (1943) 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
California. 



1 Resigned as of September, 1944. 

2 Resigned as of September, 1943 

3 Resigned as of October, 1943. 

4 Resigned as of March, 1944. 
6 Resigned as of June, 1944. 



Margaret Woods, Instructor in Modern Languages. (1943) 

A.B., Wellesley College; M.A., Pennsylvania State College; Middlebury College; 
Columbia University; Colorado College. 

Wanda Zbiec, Instructor in Mathematics. (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

1 Robert J. Bryan, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 
A.B., Washington and Jefferson College. 

J. Calvin Fleming, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 
A.B., College of Wooster; University of Pittsburgh. 

Blandina Foster, Instructor in English. (1944) 

A.B., Albright College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

2 Gail Holliday, Instructor in Biology. (1944) 

B.Ped., Bethany College; M.A., Washington and Jefferson College; Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh. 

Paul E. Brown, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 

A.B., Geneva College; A.M., University of Michigan; University of Pennsylvania. 

Frank M. Ellis, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh. 

Fred Adam Miller, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 
B.S., Muskingum College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

Howard B. Trombley, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 
A.B., Waynesburg College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 



Alberta Frances Quinlin, Recorder and Associate in Guidance and Personnel. {1936) 
A.B., Bethany College; Columbia University. 

Rosamond Eliassen, Assistant in English in 1943. 
B.A., Ohio State University. 

Robert Husband, Assistant in Economics in 1943. 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Elizabeth Murphy, Assistant in Biology in 1943. 

B.S., Bethany College; University of New Hampshire 

Wilma M. Sumpstine, Associate in Biology (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Paul Waddell, Assistant in Physics in 1944. 

A.B., Bethany College; Indiana University; Cornell University. 



1 Resigned as of June, 1944. 

2 Resigned as of March, 1944. 



NAVY STAFF 

OFFICERS 

Lieut. Sherman D. Henderson, D-V(S), USNR, Commanding Officer, July 1943 to June 
1944. 

Lieut. Gordon J. Longley, D-V(S) , USNR, Commanding Officer, June 1944- 

Lieut. Edmund S. Gard, D-V(S), USNR, Executive Officer, June 1943 to August 1943. 

Lieut, (jg) Daniel Z. Gibson, D-V(S), USNR, Executive Officer, July 1943 to March 1944. 

Lieut, Herbert C. Peiffer, Jr., D-V(S), USNR, Executive Officer, August 1943- 

Lieut. (jg) Merlin W. Schultz, D-V(S), USNR, First Lieutenant, April 1944 to July 1944. 

Lieut. Theron J. Williams, D-V(S), USNR, First Lieutenant, August 1944. 

Lieut, (jg) Joseph F. Coughlin, D-V(S), USNR, First Lieutenant, September 1944- 

Lieut. (jg) Clarence Crane, Jr., USN, (MC), Medical Officer, June 1943 to January 
1944. 

Lieut. George W. Cooper (MC), USN, (ret), Medical Officer, January 1944 to May 1944. 

Lieut, (jg) Harold C. L'Hommedieu, MC-V(S), USNR, Medical Officer, June 1944 to 
July 1944. 

Lieut. Comdr. George S. Peters, MC-V(G), USNR, Medical Officer, July 1944- 

Ens. Betty Grant Copenhaver, (SC), W-V(S), USNR, Disbursing Officer, June 1943 to 
April 1944. 

Lieut, (jg) Juanita Miller Spector (SC), W-V(S), USNR, Disbursing Officer, March 
1944 to October 1944. 

Lieut, (jg) Wilma W. Thomas, (SC), W-V(S), USNR, Disbursing Officer, September 
1944- 

INSTRUCTORS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Gentile, Anthony R., CSp, (A)(AA) , V6, USNR, June 1943 to November 1943. 

McCrehen, Francis J., CSp(A)(AA), V6, USNR, June 1943 to December 1943. 
Max, Daniel H., CSp(A)(PA), V6, USNR, June 1943- 

Foster, Clifford W., CSp(A)(AA), V6, USNR, November 1943 to June 1944. 
Jones, Murray I., CSp(A) (PA), V6, USNR, June 1944 to August 1944. 



Redding, James A., CSp(A)(PA), V6, USNR, August 1944- 
Winterton, John L., CSp(A)(T), V6, USNR, August 1944- 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Edgar Hugh Behymer Librarian 

A.B., Indiana University; A.B.L.S., University of Michigan; M.A., University of 
Chicago. 

Lois J. Behymer Acting Assistant Librarian 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

j Dr. Samuel Sprigg Jacob College Physician 

A.B., West Virginia University; M.D., Jefferson Medical School. 

Dr. Edgar Wade Mahan Acting College Physician 

A.B., Bethany College; M.D., University of Maryland. 

Gladys Carnahan Gibson, R.N College Nurse and Supervisor of Infirmary 

2 Betty Jane Reuther, R.N Assistant College Nurse 

ADMINISTRATION STAFF 
Lucille Ball Head Dietitian and Dormitory Manager 

Harry Milton Myers Bookkeeper 

Dorothy Rohland Baum Secretary to the President 

David W. Sopp Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Florence Prendegast Ass't Dietitian, Phillips Hall 

Katherine Blackford Ass't Dietitian, Bethany House 

Helen M. Sopp Secretary to the Executive Secretary 

Dessie Mae Rupe Secretary to the Bursar 

Marion Culley. Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Nancy Gibson Cashier 

Pauline Gilbert Secretary to the Dean of the Faculty 

1 With the Armed Forces. 
8 Resigned as of August 1944. 



RESIDENTS OF COLLEGE DORMITORIES 

Margaret Carrigan Head of Residence and Social Director 

Vira M. Hettler House Supervisor — Sigma Nu House 

Ethel D. Metzner House Supervisor — Kappa Delta 

Mary Belle Carman House Supervisor — Zeta Tau Alpha 

Grace Hine House Supervisor — Alpha Xi Delta 

Bess Magee House Supervisor — Phi Mu 

Jessie Beans House Supervisor — Alpha Kappa Pi 

Margaret Wilson House Supervisor — Colonial Hall 

Elsie Porterfield House Supervisor — Helwig House 

House Supervisor — Gay House 






FUNCTIONAL COMMITTEES OF FACULTY 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Academic Council: 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Woolery, Mr. Eliassen, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Allen, Mr. Stevenson, 
Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Admissions and Classifications: 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Weimer, Mr. Barlow, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Kirkpacrick. 

Honors: 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. McKenzie, Miss Hoagland. 

Lectures and Concerts: 

Mr. Behymer, Mr. Weimer, Mr. Carter. 

Library: 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Leitch, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Allen, Mr. Paustian, Mr. Behymer. 

Schedule: 

Mr. Allen, Mr. McKenzie, Mr. Roberts. 

Student Welfare and Guidance 
Council on Guidance and Personnel: 

Mr. Weimer, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Stevenson, Miss Carrigan, Dr. Mahan, Mr. Hettler, 
Mr. Barlow, Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Activities and Social Life: 

Miss Carrigan, Miss Mahaffey, Mr. Carter, Miss Wood, Mr. Nicholson. 

Placement: 

Mr. Eliassen, Mr. Bennett, Miss Quinlin, Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Athletics and Physical Recreation: 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Sumpstine, Mr. Knight, Mr. Nicholsen, Miss Benedict. 

Religious Life: 

Mr. Stevenson, Miss Mahaffey, Mr. Eliassen. 

Financial Aids: 

Mr. Cramblet, Mr. Barlow, Mr. Hettler, Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Curriculum of the Liberal Arts College: 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Woolery, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Stevenson, Mr. Eliassen, Mr. Allen. 

Courses for Veterans and War Workers: 

Mr. Allen, Mr. Weimer, Mr. Gildersleeve, Mr. Bennett, Miss Carrigan. 



PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



PURPOSE 

The continuing purpose of Bethany College is to assist its stu- 
dents in their preparation for intelligent and creative participation 
in contemporary living, and to maintain in its faculty and student 
body standards of excellence in scholarship, culture, and conduct. 

The particular aims of the college are: 

(i) To provide incentives to and training in the scientific meth- 
od, in logical analysis, and in creative expression. 

(2) To develop an understanding of the institutions and cul- 
tures of the past, especially as they bear upon the problems 
of contemporary civilization; and to effect an integration of 
some of the major departments of human knowledge. 

(3) To furnish the means in knowledge and experience for 
happy, intelligent, and constructive membership in family 
and state. 

(4) To facilitate adequate adjustment to academic, social, and 
vocational problems. 

(5) To individualize, as far as possible, the curricular program 
and requirements, to provide for some degree of specializa- 
tion in one major field, and for a synthesis of materials in 
that field. 

(6) To provide opportunities for the development of physical 
powers, the safeguarding of health, and participation in 
recreational and avocational activities. 

(7) To provide higher education in an atmosphere sympathetic 
to Christian ideals and Christian faith and to conserve and 
develop the moral character and religious life of its students. 

HISTORY 

Buffalo Seminary, the forerunner of Bethany College, was in- 
augurated at Bethany, Virginia, in the year 1818 in the home of 
Alexander Campbell, commonly known as the Mansion. Here, for 
some years, Mr. Campbell offered educational advantages for the 
youth of the community as well as training for young men in the 
work of the Christian ministry. 



Bethany College Bulletin 19 

A charter was granted to the Trustees of Bethany College by the 
Legislature of Virginia on March 2, 1840, authorizing the estab- 
lishment of a "seminary of learning for the instruction of youth in 
the various branches of science and literature, the useful arts, agri- 
culture, and the learned and foreign languages." 

The trustees of the college named Mr. Campbell as the first 
president and directed him to formulate a plan for instruction for 
the new institution. He had strong convictions that the spirit of 
the institution should be altogether non-sectarian; in the charter 
occurred the statement that "nothing herein contained shall be so 
construed as at any time to authorize the establishment of a theo- 
logical professorship." He believed that the formation of moral 
character should be the chief goal in education and was equally 
convinced of the necessity for an undergirding of moral instruc- 
tion. Accordingly the Bible was made a regular textbook in the 
college, and continues as part of the curriculum and life of the in- 
stitution. 

In October of 1841, the first session opened with over a hundred 
students in attendance. In addition to Mr. Campbell the first 
faculty included W. K. Pendleton, A. F. Ross, Charles Stewart, 
and Robert Richardson. They envisaged a college of great useful- 
ness for the training of thoughtful leadership in business and the 
professions as well as the church, and they set for the college a 
fine tradition of liberal scholarship and standards of excellence in 
accomplishment and personal living. 

From the first Bethany's curriculum was marked by unusual 
emphasis on the physical sciences. The growth of the college was 
noticed not only by an increased student body but also an expan- 
sion of facilities and an enlarged endowment in the more modern 
period. There was an increasing emphasis upon high standards, 
progressive educational procedures and sound scholarship. 

The centennial of the college was observed during the academic 
year of 1 939-1 940 with celebrations on March 2, 1940, date of 
the original charter; on May 10 and 11, 1940, date of the earliest 
faculty meeting; culminating in the Centennial Celebration on 
June 1, 1940. 

Bethany College begins the second century of service to youth 
with confidence and courage. Faculty and curriculum have been 
greatly strengthened. The plant and equipment of the college are 
adequate for the demands being made upon them for the largest 



20 Bethany College Bulletin 

student body in its history. There is a sustaining faith in the per- 
manent values of a Christian college of the liberal arts in this hour 
of war and threatening disaster. For the duration of the war, the 
college offers such facilities as are needed for the use and support 
of the nation's effort to preserve the priceless heritage that is the 
common possession of all free men. 

Bethany College, like all other institutions of the United States, 
is cooperating as fully as possible to further the defense efforts 
of our nation. The country needs as never before college trained 
men and women to meet not only the emergencies brought about 
by the present conflict, but also to help solve the problems of the 
peace. To this end the college has adopted an accelerated educa- 
tional program which will be followed until the present war emer- 
gency is over. 

Bethany College, like all other educational institutions of the 
United States, is cooperating as fully as possible to further the 
war efforts of our nation. To aid in training young men and women 
for national service in the shortest feasible period, the college 
adopted an accelerated program early in the war, making it pos- 
sible for students to graduate in less than three years and thus be 
prepared to enter war service at the earliest possible moment. 

A Civilian Pilot Training unit was established on the campus, 
in July of 1942 using college residence halls and college instructors 
and continuing for a year. 

July 1, 1943 the United States Navy selected Bethany as an 
institution for the location of a V-12 training unit. The program 
was carried on under the supervision of the Fifth Naval District. 
Some 330 young men were designated for the Bethany unit, with 
a minimum required basic course and the privilege of choosing 
from the general college offerings for their electives. Three six- 
teen-week terms for the calendar year were established, and for 
the convenience of designation and evaluation of credits these 
terms were designated respectively as the summer, winter and 
spring semesters. The faculty considerably expanded, especially in 
mathematics and physics, and instruction continued with classes 
open to both V-12 men in uniform and civilian students. Housing 
of the naval trainees has been cared for by use of Phillips, Cochran, 
and Helwig Halls. The mess hall and naval administrative cffices 
both were located in Phillips Hall. 

The accelerated program of college training has resulted in 



Bethany College Bulletin 21 

graduation exercises being held at the end of each semester. Stu- 
dents graduating at these in between times are considered mem- 
bers of the college class finishing in the academic year next ending 
and are so recognized at the annual commencement in June. 

During the war period the west side of the campus has been the 
scene of much outdoor reconstruction. Coal-stripping in the ravine 
and along the highway has been followed by grading which repre- 
sents the beginning of athletic fields which will include a quarter- 
mile track as well as football field and tennis courts. This will even- 
tually involve changes in approaches to the campus and will point 
the way for future building locations. 

Bethany College has seen this country threatened by foreign 
and civil wars and has survived. Today, it is better prepared than 
ever before for whatever the immediate future may hold. This war 
will end, and in the years that will follow victory, Bethany Col- 
lege will continue to make contributions to winning and making 
secure a lasting peace. 



ADMISSION AND INDUCTION 



General Requirements — Bethany College will accept as stu- 
dents only young men and young women who are well qualified 
to benefit from the type of educational experience and academic 
life available. All applicants for admission must furnish evidence 
of high moral character, good physical and mental health, sound 
scholastic preparation, and intellectual maturity. The Committee 
on Admissions and Classifications will consider the best interests of 
the applicant and the college before final acceptance is made. New 
students will be admitted at the beginning of any semester or term. 

Freshman Admission — Applicants for admission to the fresh- 
man class will be judged acceptable in terms of scholastic prepara- 
tion and intellectual maturity by any one of the following three 
plans: 

I. By Certificate 

(a) Graduates of any accredited high school or secondary 
school may be admitted to freshman standing on pres- 
entation of statement signed by proper school author- 
ities, showing the kind of and the amount of scholastic 
work done, provided the scholastic work completed is 
of such quality as to place the student in the upper 
half of his graduating class. Exceptions to this will 
be made only upon adequate evidence from scholastic 
aptitude tests administered by a competent examiner 
at the college or at the secondary school. 

(b) Those students of exceptional ability with high rank in 
their high school class and with the whole-hearted rec- 
ommendation of their high school principals may be 
admitted after three and one half years in high school 
if their records indicate the completion of at least fif- 
teen acceptable units of secondary school work. Most 
of the states in this area have indicated by official ac- 
tion that such high school students will be granted their 
diplomas from the secondary school upon completion 
of a year's work in college with satisfactory grades. 



Bethany College Bulletin 23 

(c) Two-thirds of the units of secondary school work ac- 
cepted for entrance must be in English, foreign lan- 
guage, mathematics, natural sciences, and social stud- 
ies. These units should normally include three units of 
English, at least three units of a foreign language or 
social studies, and two units of mathematics or science. 
In the case of graduates of senior high schools the same 
general pattern of units is desired. 

II. By Examination 

Students who have not been regularly prepared for college 
in a recognized secondary school may apply for admission by mak- 
ing a complete statement regarding qualifications and training. 
Such students can be regularly admitted if they qualify in a bat- 
tery of achievement examinations given at the college under the 
direction of the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. The 
examinations will be given upon the scholastic work covered by 
the list of secondary units approved by the North Central Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

College Entrance Board Examination certificates will be 
accepted in lieu of high school certificates or examinations by 
Bethany College. 

III. By Cumulative Record 

The Committee on Admissions and Classifications will re- 
ceive cumulative standard test records and other objective data 
which may give evidence of an applicant's ability to profit by col- 
lege experience. Such records or data should (1) cover at least 
the three most recent years of the applicant's school life, (2) pro- 
vide fairly reliable information as to his intellectual capacity, (3) 
include an accurate record of the results of comparable achieve- 
ment measures in various academic subjects. Data obtained from 
all tests will be interpreted in authenticated comparable terms, 
such as well established public school or independent school per- 
centiles. 

Advanced Standing — Students from other accredited colleges 
may be admitted upon the presentation of evidence that they have 
satisfied the general requirements for admission and that they 
were in good standing in the institution last attended. All applica- 
tions for admission from students for advanced standing must be 



24 Bethany College Bulletin 

accompanied by official certificates stating the nature and extent 
of college courses completed and all disciplinary or academic items 
that belong to such a record. Such a statement must be signed by 
the president or other official of the institution where the work was 
done. 

The evaluation and acceptance of credits earned at an accredited 
institution will depend upon the quality of the academic work 
completed. Only a minimum of academic work ranked below ' 'av- 
erage' ' (grade C) will be accepted. Not more than sixty-five hours 
will be allowed for junior college work. 

Credit allowed for work done or courses followed in the Armed 
Forces will depend on the nature of the materials or the training, 
its relation to the liberal arts courses, and the appraisal received 
from the United States Armed Forces Institute of the courses 
taken. 

Credit will be allowed for work done in non-accredited institu- 
tions only by special action of the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications. This Committee may require that the applicant 
take a series of subject matter examinations, or that the applicant 
be classified one class below that attained in the institution from 
which the credits were presented. 

A student transferring to Bethany cannot be granted a degree 
unless he has been in attendance at the college at least during his 
senior year. Veterans returning for completion of work for degrees, 
for retraining and refresher courses, or entering college in begin- 
ning work will be given due consideration for special training and 
allowed special treatment, as individual cases may deserve, in re- 
spect to credits and requirements for degrees. 

Special Students — A limited number of students who are not 
candidates for a degree may be admitted to the college as "Special 
Students" with permission to pursue selected courses. Application 
must be made for such classification, and approval for the same 
may be given only if the applicant can satisfy the Committee on 
Admissions and Classifications that he can pursue the courses with 
profit, that he has a serious purpose in mind, and that he can meet 
the general requirements as to health, character, and mental abil- 
ity. 

Advanced Standing by Achievement Tests — Any students 
who have anticipated the subject matter of any of the prescrip- 
tions for degrees listed under the requirement of hours may make 



Bethany College Bulletin 25 

application to take an achievement test. If the result of this test in- 
dicates sufficient mastery of the subject the prescription will be 
waived. Passing the achievement tests will not give credit in hours 
toward the degree. The application for an achievement test should 
be made to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. It 
should state the achievement tests which the student desires to 
take and the basis of his preparation for the test. The statement 
should include detail as to any supplementary reading done in 
addition to the prescribed school work in the form of a list of titles 
and authors of books. The testing will be in charge of the Dean of 
Students and the heads of the departments concerned. 

Placement Tests for Freshmen — For purposes of educational 
guidance all freshmen are required to take placement examinations 
in certain academic subjects such as English, history, and foreign 
languages. These examinations are given before the final registra- 
tion at the opening of the college year in order that failures due to 
misplacement in courses may be avoided if possible. The type of 
examination used is designed to test the readiness with which the 
student can adapt his knowledge to the requirements of college 
work. The results of these examinations are used to determine a 
student's placement in courses and in sections. 

Orientation Program and Registration — The college recog- 
nizes the need of giving newly entering students an introduction to 
their work, and for this purpose it requires freshmen to come to 
Bethany several days before the formal registration of all other 
students. These "Freshman Days" are devoted to efforts to help 
the freshmen make a proper adjustment. "Freshman Days" are 
scheduled at the beginning of each semester. 

The time designated for "Freshman Days" will be used for the 
following activities: 

a. Getting properly settled in dormitory. 

b. Registration and payment of fees. 

c. Physical examination. 

d. Placement and achievement tests which will enable the fac- 
ulty to place the student in the classes for which he is best 
fitted. 

e. Conferences with the faculty counselor as to educational and 
vocational program. 

f. Social and recreational activities, "get acquainted" meetings, 
etc. 



26 Bethany College Bulletin 

Attendance during "Freshman Days" is required of all who will 
enter as freshmen. The dates for the summer semester of 1944 are 
July 5 and 6; for the winter semester, November 1 and 2; and for 
the spring semester of 1945, February 28 and March 1. 

Pre-College Guidance — At various times during the year op- 
portunity is offered for the pre-college guidance of secondary 
school juniors and seniors who are looking toward college. At these 
times it is possible for parents and students to confer with officers 
of the college, to have school records appraised, and to take college 
aptitude tests. This service is offered to prospective students with- 
out obligation to them and may be secured at the college and by 
appointment in other centers as New York, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, 
Cleveland, Detroit, and Chicago. Arrangement for pre-college 
guidance of any kind should be made with the Director of Ad- 
missions. 

Method of Enrollment — All matters related to the enroll- 
ment of new students are handled through the office of the Director 
of Admissions. The proper form to be used in making application 
for admission and blanks to be used in making application for a 
room in one of the college dormitories will be supplied by his office. 
The Application for Admission (see preliminary form in back of 
catalogue) should be filed as early as possible and must be ac- 
companied by the admission fee of $10.00. In case application is 
denied, the admission fee will be refunded. These should be mailed 
directly to the Director of Admissions. 

The application form requires rather complete data as to the 
applicant's personal and educational background together with an 
official record of his scholastic preparation. The Committee on 
Admissions and Classifications will review applications within two 
weeks after they are received and notice of action taken will be 
sent directly to the applicant. The admission fee serves as a dormi- 
tory room reservation deposit if the applicant is accepted, and is 
set aside as a breakage deposit at the time of registration at the 
college. If the student is accepted and for any reason is unable to 
attend Bethany College, $7.00 of the admission fee will be re- 
funded provided notice of this decision is given to the college on 
or before the specific dates designated on the application forms. If 
withdrawal occurs after these dates, no part of the application fee 
will be refunded. 

Reservation of Dormitory Rooms — All rooms in college dor- 



Bethany College Bulletin 27 

mitories must be engaged in advance. In case the student remains 
in the dormitory for the full year, the admission fee will be re- 
funded, except for proper charges for breakage and inspection. In 
the case of withdrawal from the dormitory after registration, 
charges for room rental are refunded on a pro-rata basis, but the 
deposit fee is forfeited by the student. 

An applicant for admission who finds that it will be impossible 
to enter college can get a refund of $7.00 if notice is given to the 
Director of Admissions prior to the specific date designated on the 
application form. 

Plans showing the arrangement of rooms in the dormitories, de- 
tailed statement of prices, and reservation blanks may be obtained 
from the Director of Admissions. 



EXPENSES 

Tuition — The tuition each semester is one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars for fifteen academic hours or less. For each academic 
hour in excess of fifteen, an additional eight dollars is charged. No 
charge is made for required courses in physical education or orien- 
tation taken to meet the graduation requirements. 

Tuition for special students carrying less than twelve hours is 
$10.00 per semester hour. Special fees will be charged as usual in 
such cases. 

By special action of the Board of Trustees, the tuition for alumni 
of the college has been set at twenty-five dollars per semester. All 
special fees will be charged as usual in such cases. 

By special action of the Board of Trustees, members of families 
of home and foreign missionaries actively in service are allowed 
free tuition for regular academic work at the college. 

By action of the Board of Trustees, after July 1, 1945 regular 
V tuition for each semester will be one hundred thirty seven dollars 
and fifty cents. 

FEES 

Admission Fee — A fee of ten dollars is required with each Ap- 
plication for Admission. At the time a student enrolls at the college 
this fee becomes a guarantee and breakage deposit on the room of 
a student living in one of the college dormitories. The college re- 
serves the right to make legitimate charges against the room and 
breakage deposit fee for any damage done to the room or its 
furnishings, and to declare forfeiture of the key deposit fee if keys 
are not returned immediately after the room is vacated. In case 
the student does not occupy the room as agreed in the room con- 
tract, the fee is forfeited by the student. If the applicant is not 
planning to live in a college dormitory, the fees will be applied 
on the tuition charge. 

Health and Matriculation Fee — A health and matriculation 
fee of $10.00 each semester is charged to all students. This fee 
covers the special services that are ordinarily charged as matricula- 
tion fee, student health fee, library fee, gymnasium fee, etc. 

Student Activities Fee — A student activities fee of $10.00 
each semester is charged to all students. This fee provides for 
participation in athletic competition and contests, an interesting 



Bethany College Bulletin 29 

program of lectures and concerts, and a variety of extra-curricular 
activities directly managed by the Student Board of Governors. 

MEN'S RESIDENCE HALL 

Cochran Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall ranges from 
$60.00 to $75.00 per semester for each student. Single and double 
rooms, are provided. This hall, now occupied by the Navy V-12 
Unit, will be available for civilian use November 1, 1944. 

Bed linen, bed spreads, and curtains are furnished and laundered 
for all residents. Porter service is provided for the entire building. 
Young men rooming in this hall are expected to furnish their own 
blankets, towels, study lamps, and rugs. The hall is completely 
closed when college is not in session. Rooms must be engaged in 
advance. 

WOMEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS 

Phillips Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall ranges from 
$60.00 to $80.00 per semester for each student. This hall is now 
occupied by the Navy V-12 Unit. 

Helwig House — The rent for rooms in this house ranges from 
$55.00 to $60.00 per semester for each student. This hall, now oc- 
cupied by the Navy, will be available for civilian use November 1, 
1944. 

Gateway Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $60.00 per 
semester for each student. 

The rental charge in Phillips Hall, Helwig House and Gateway 
Hall includes such items as electric lights, janitor service, use of 
kitchenettes, and laundries. Rooms must be engaged in advance. 

Dormitory Houses — Rooms in these houses are for young 
women affiliated with a sorority group. They are rented by the 
individual student who signs a rental contract for her room under 
the same conditions which apply in other residence halls but the 
sorority group is responsible for providing a minimum number of 
occupants. If this number is not provided the group can be charged 
a monthly rental to take care of the loss of income to the college. 

The rent for rooms in these houses ranges from $45.00 to $55.00 
per semester for each student. Single and double rooms are avail- 
able. The rental charge covers the cost of utilities service but the 
expense for the care and supervision of the houses is the respon- 
sibility of the sorority. 



30 Bethany College Bulletin 

Young women living in any of these residence halls are ex- 
pected to furnish comforts, blankets, curtains, sheets, pillow cases, 
towels, study lamps and rugs. They are expected to care for their 
own rooms. 

Special arrangements have been made whereby students attend- 
ing Bethany College while the college is operating on the basis of 
sixteen week semesters will be charged room rent in college oper- 
ated dormitories at the uniform charge of $50 per semester. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS IN ALL RESIDENCE HALLS 

Permission for the installation of radios and special electrical 
equipment in any of these halls must be obtained from the Head 
of Residence and a charge may be assessed for such items. 

Room assignments in all college dormitories are made for the 
academic year. For freshmen they are made in the order of appli- 
cation; for upperclassmen, in the order of class membership, sup- 
plemented by the drawing of lots. Any request for a change of 
assignment must be approved by the officer in charge, and a new 
contract issued. Preference is given to upperclassmen only for a 
limited time. 

Single and double rooms are available in all residence halls. 

Double rooms may not be reserved by one student without extra 
charge. 

Residence halls will be open for freshmen for each semester the 
day before Freshman Days, and for upperclassmen the day before 
registration. 

Residence halls will be closed when college is not in session. 

Bethany College reserves all rights in connection with the as- 
signment, termination of occupancy, and re-assignment of rooms 
in all dormitories. 

BOARD 

Previous to July 1943 young women of the college obtained 
board at Phillips Hall and the young men at the Bethany House. 
Since July 1, 1943 both the young women and young men of the 
college have obtained board in the Bethany House. Board for both 
college women and men is $J per week. All students are expected 
to board at the Bethany House. The price of board is subject to 
revision in case of change in general price levels. 



Bethany College Bulletin 31 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR SEMESTER 

Tuition $125.00 

Room in College Dormitory 50.00 

Board at College Dining Hall (7.00 per week) 1 12 .00 

Student Activities Fee 10.00 

Health and Matriculation Fee 10 .00 

Total required fees for semester 307 .00 

MISCELLANEOUS FRESHMAN FEES 

Admission Fee (All new students) $ 10 .00 

(This fee must be paid before any action is taken on 

application for admission.) 
Freshman Days Fee (First term or semester only) 10.00 

(Freshman testing program, etc.) 
Deposit for Dormitory Room Key 1 .00 

(Refunded on return of keys.) 
Total required fees for freshmen, First Semester. ....... 328 .00 

To the above cost must be added fees for special courses, the 
cost of books, clothing, laundry, travel, and personal spending 
money. The cost of books per the college year (two semesters) 
averages $20 to $25. The other items are not unusual but will be 
determined by the individual student. 

The college is required to collect the West Virginia Sales Tax of 
2% on room and board in addition to published charges for the 
same. 

MUSIC FEES 

Private Lessons, two lessons a week, per semester $50.00 

Private Lessons, one lesson a week, per semester 27.00 

Organ Practice, one hour each day, per semester 20.00 

Piano Practice, one hour each day, per semester 5 .00 

Piano Practice, three hours per week, per semester 3 .00 

Practice Room for instrumental music, one hour each day 

per semester 2 .00 

LABORATORY AND COURSE FEES 

Biology 11, 12, 36, 57, 65, 76, 78 $ 6.00 per semester 

Biology 53, 54 7 .00 per semester 

Biology 67 5 .00 per semester 



32 Bethany College Bulletin 

Biology 91-92 (each hour) $ 6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 11 A, 12A 6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 25, 26, 51, 52 7.00 per semester 

Chemistry 61, 62, 65, 66 8 .00 per semester 

Chemistry 63, 64 5 .00 per semester 

Chemistry 45, 75, 76, 91, 92 (each hour) .... 4.00 per semester 

Education 81, 82 20.00 per semester 

Speech and Dramatics 50, 51, 59, 60 2.00 per semester 

Mathematics 21, 25, 16 2.00 per semester 

Mathematics 22, 24 4.00 per semester 

Physics 31, 32, ss, $6, 63, 67, 68 4.00 per semester 

Physics 91, 92 (each hour) 4.00 per semester 

Psychology 53. 3 .00 per semester 

Psychology 64 2 .00 per semester 

Secretarial Training 11, 1 2, 50 5 .00 per semester 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Comprehensive examination for students not in residence. . $25 .00 
Each academic hour when less than twelve, per semester. . 10.00 

Each change in registration after first two weeks 1 .00 

Freshman days fee 10 .00 

Radio use fee, per semester 50 

Room reservation fee for upperclassmen 5 .00 

Late registration, first three days, per day 2 .00 

Special examinations in any department or course 2.00 

Special placement or achievement test in any department . . 2 .00 

Transcript fee (after first issue) 1 .00 

Graduation and diploma fee 10.00 

Infirmary charge, per day (after three days) 1 .00 

BREAKAGE AND GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 

Certain fees are charged to cover cost of materials placed in the 
hands of students or as a guarantee of proper performance of duties 
assigned. Unused balances of these fees are refunded at the end of 
the college year. 

Biology 34 $ 5 .00 per semester 

Biology 53, 54 3-00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 45, 75, 76, 91, 92 3-00 per semester 



Bethany College Bulletin 33 

Chemistry 25, 26, 5 1, 52 $6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66 7.00 per semester 

Chemistry 81, 82 (travel) . . 10.00 per semester 

Guarantee Deposit for Student Employment . 5 .00 per semester 

Key deposit for all dormitory rooms ' 1 .00 

Deposit on locker in gymnasium 1 .00 

NOTE: A deposit on locker keys is charged to all students en- 
rolling in activity courses in physical education or to those reserv- 
ing lockers in the gymnasium for personal use. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Tuition, room rent, board, student fees, health and matricula- 
tion fees, are due and payable on Registration Day of each sem- 
ester. All accounts are payable to the Bursar of Bethany College. 

Upon request, a period of two weeks after the opening of the 
semester may be allowed for the payment of tuition, room rent, 
board, and fees as listed on the invoice. It is required in each case, 
however, that the student shall make a minimum cash payment of 
$50.00 on Registration Day of each semester. Students are not 
considered to be properly enrolled any semester until this mini- 
mum payment has been made. Scholarship awards do not apply 
on the required minimum payment. In case the student's account 
is less than $50.00, full payment of the same is required in advance. 

All accounts must be paid in full within two weeks after registra- 
tion. 

Arrangements may be made for deferred payment by proper 
application addressed to the Committee on Financial Aids. 

As an associate of the Tuition Plan, Inc., we are prepared to 
extend to parents or guardians the opportunity of paying any bal- 
ance on tuition, board, room rent and other college fees in equal 
monthly installments during the college year. The cost of this 
convenience, which is entirely optional with the parent, is 4% of 
the balance due. Arrangements for this service should be com- 
pleted before Registration Day. Details will be furnished on re- 
quest. 

No student will be allowed to take final examinations or to re- 
ceive academic credit of any kind in any semester until all his 
financial obligations to the college have been met. In case a student 
withdraws from college, all charges except certain special fees are 



34 Bethany College Bulletin 

pro rated, figured to the end of the week on which the withdrawal 
takes place. Scholarship awards are not applied on the tuition of 
students who withdraw before the end of the semester until all 
other charges have been paid in full. There can be no change in the 
tuition or fees charged a student because of a reduction in credit 
hours in his schedule of courses after the first two weeks of any 
semester. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AIDS 



FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

Honor Scholarships — Scholarships to the amount of $250 are 
awarded to entering freshman students who rank in the highest 
honor group of secondary school graduating class. These provide 
a stipend of $100 the freshman year, $75 for the sophomore year, 
and $75 for the junior year. The award will not be continued 
beyond the freshman year if the student fails to maintain an aca- 
demic point average of 1.5. 

Trustee Scholarships — A limited number of scholarships to 
the amount of $175 are available to entering freshmen who rank 
high in secondary school graduating class and who would not be 
able to attend college without such financial help. Such a scholar- 
ship provides a stipend of $75 for the freshman year, $50 for the 
sophomore year, and $50 for the junior year. The award will not 
be continued beyond the freshman year if the student fails to 
maintain an academic point average of 1.25. 

Competitive Scholarships — Early in the spring the college 
holds a competitive examination for high school seniors, and thirty 
scholarships ranging in amount from $600 to $800 are awarded to 
students making high scores on the examination. These awards are 
on the basis of $150 or $200 for each of the four college years. An 
academic point average of 1.5 after the freshman year must be 
maintained in order to have the stipend continued. 

Regional Alumni Scholarships — Ten regional alumni schol- 
arships are to be awarded to freshmen of unusual ability upon 
recommendation of the alumni groups in various districts. These 
are located all over the United States and are designated by the 
Bethany College Alumni Association in collaboration with the ad- 
ministration of the college. These scholarship awards are for an 
amount of $600 applicable on the tuition account of the student at 
the rate of $75 per semester. The scholarship may be discontinued 
at any time the student fails to make an academic point average 
of 1.5 at the end of any one semester. 

To be eligible for any one of these awards, the student must 
come from the upper quarter of his high school or preparatory 
school graduating class, he must have demonstrated interest in 



2,6 Bethany College Bulletin 

extracurricular activities by active participation, he must be well 
recommended by responsible school officers, and he must have the 
endorsement of Bethany alumni in his area. 

Recommendation Scholarships — High school seniors in the 
Pittsburgh area are often recommended for scholarship awards on 
the basis of aptitude tests administered under the sponsorship of 
the Civic Club or the endorsement of the Phi Beta Kappa Associa- 
tion of Pittsburgh. In each case, the final award is in the hands of 
the ccllege administration, but the recommendation or endorse- 
ment is almost always given favorable consideration. Awards to 
students who have such recommendation are usually #150 for each 
of four years. 

General Regulations — All scholarships for freshmen are 
awarded by the Committee on Financial Aid after consultation 
with the Committee on Admissions and the Director of Admis- 
sions. No award will be continued beyond the first semester if the 
student fails to abide by the regulations and ideals of the college. 
The stipends that go with each scholarship award are applied on 
the tuition charge on the basis of one-half for the first semester and 
one-half for the second semester. Applications must be filed with 
the Director of Admissions at least three weeks prior to the date 
of admission to the college. All applications from new students 
must be accompanied by a transcript of secondary school work and 
the required Application for Admission and Admission Fee. 

For students electing the accelerated program, scholarship 
awards will be figured on the same basis for each semester. The 
same requirements as to academic point average will apply for the 
accelerated program. 

Students will be eligible to receive only one award. Students 
qualifying for more than one must select the award which they 
prefer to accept. 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UPPERCLASSMEN 

Trustee Scholarships — Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may 
apply for scholarship awards to the amount of $50 to $150, which 
have been authorized by the Board of Trustees for students above 
the freshman rank who maintain a high grade of academic work 
and who would be unable to continue in college without such 
financial assistance. It is expected that in each case the applicant 
shall have met the following conditions: 



Bethany College Bulletin 37 

1. His academic record must be above 1.25 average in the aca- 
demic year preceding the application. 

2. His financial obligations to the college must be met promptly. 

3. His influence on the student body should be in every sense 
wholesome. 

4. His continuance in college should depend upon some financial 
assistance. 

5. He shall have made a worthwhile contribution to the life of 
the college and the college program. 

Scholarships of $150 are not usually awarded to students who 
have other forms of financial aid such as student employment. 
Academic standing and accomplishment are the chief criteria for 
scholarship awards. 

It is understood that the following reasons will operate to cancel 
this scholarship for the next semester: 

1. Failure to maintain an academic point average of 1.25. 

2. Serious academic censure for any cause. 

3. Unsatisfactory conduct. 

All applications for scholarship awards from members of the 
student body must be filed with the Committee on Financial Aid 
three weeks before the end of the semester. Applications received 
after that time cannot be acted upon for the next college year. 
When a trustee scholarship is awarded the recipient is asked to 
sign a statement indicating his acknowledgment of an obligation 
and his intent to pay same after graduation. 

Designated Scholarships — The following scholarships have 
been especially designated by friends of the college and are subject 
to such special provisions as are mentioned: 

Mary A. Morrison Scholarship — This is a scholarship cover- 
ing three-fourths of the cost of tuition. 

Isaac Mills Scholarship — This scholarship covers a part of 
the tuition charge, the benefits of which are to be received by 
a ministerial student. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship — This scholarship of $100 per 
semester applies on tuition. The student receiving the benefits of 
the same is to be nominated by a member of the Willett family. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship — This scholarship covers $30 on 
tuition cost per semester. 



38 Bethany College Bulletin 

Albert C. Israel Scholarship — This scholarship yields $20 
per semester to apply on tuition of a descendant of Albert C. Israel. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship — The income from this scholar- 
ship fund is awarded for the purpose of helping students who are 
preparing for the mission field or the ministry. The students who 
receive the benefits of this scholarship are to be nominated by the 
donor. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship — The income from this scholarship 
fund is awarded to students who have reached the senior year 
in their college course. The students receiving benefits from this 
scholarship are to be nominated by the Committee on Student Aid 
after consultation with the donor. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship — A scholarship endowed in 
memory of Mr. Herbert Moninger, a graduate of the college. 

Josiah Wilson Scholarship — As a memorial to Josiah N. and 
Wilmina S. Wilson and Nora B. Wilson a scholarship fund was 
established by Josiah N. Wilson. The income is used to aid some 
student or students who are preparing for the Christian ministry. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarships — Several scholarships covering 
a part of the tuition charge. The students who receive the benefits 
of these scholarships are to be nominated by the President of the 
college. 

Students getting designated scholarships must meet the same 
general requirements as for Trustee Scholarships but they are not 
expected to sign a statement indicating intent to repay the amount 
of the award. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Awards — The income from a fund of 
$8,000 set up by the will of Mrs. Minnie W. Schaefer of Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio to be awarded to students planning for definite 
Christian service. 

J. T. Smith Awards — The income from a fund of $17,500 es- 
tablished by J. T. Smith of Memphis, Tennessee, to be made avail- 
able for students preparing for the Christian ministry or some 
other form of Christian service. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship Fund — The in- 
come from a fund of $20,000 set up by the will of Clarinda Pendle- 
ton Lamar, in memory of her father, William Kimbrough Pendle- 
ton, member of the first faculty and second president of the college 
(1 866-1 889), is to be awarded in one or more scholarships each 
year to one or more citizens of West Virginia. These awards may 



Bethany College Bulletin 39 

be in the form of loans or outright gifts as determined by the 
faculty of Bethany College. 

The Gans Scholarships — Awards are made in this fund to 
juniors and seniors at Bethany College and to graduates of Beth- 
any College studying elsewhere who have shown "evidence of 
merit and promise in the field of science." Funds so awarded will 
be available for approved study and research in some specific field. 

Rhodes Scholarships — These scholarships have been sus- 
pended for the duration of the war. 

Senior Fellowships — Upon careful recommendation certain 
members of the junior class are designated as Senior Fellows dur- 
ing the following year. The selection is made only of students who 
have attained unusual excellence in the field of their major study 
and who by character and ability can do special work in a major 
department, as an assistant in some phase of instruction or re- 
search. The Senior Fellowship carries a small stipend. Not more 
than six senior fellowships are awarded in any one year. 

Foreign Exchange Fellowships — Through the Institute of 
International Education Bethany College has in past years been 
able to place graduates in foreign universities for graduate study. 
The State Department of the United States Government has re- 
cently suspended this privilege for the duration of the war. 

Each year at least two students from foreign countries come to 
Bethany to study on fellowships provided by the college adminis- 
tration. These students come to interpret their own people and 
their national culture to American student life. These awards are 
made only to students who are recommended by the Institute of 
International Education. 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

Bethany College Loan Funds. — By the action of the Board 
of Trustees, the several loan funds of the college have been con- 
solidated into the Bethany College Loan Fund. Loans from this 
fund may be obtained by students on complying with the condi- 
tions governing the same. Approved security is required from all 
those borrowing from the fund. The amount of money that any 
student can borrow in a single year as well as the total amount 
available to any student is limited by the size of the fund. Money 
is loaned without interest while the student is in Bethany College 
and the note is drawn to mature four months after graduation or 



40 Bethany College Bulletin 

withdrawal from college. All notes bear interest from the date of 
their maturity. 

Applications for loans must be made to the Committee on Fi- 
nancial Aid through the Executive Secretary. All financial obliga- 
tions to the college including the loan fund must be paid before an 
official transcript of the student's academic record can be issued. 

The Loan Fund was started by gifts from the Hon. T. W. 
Phillips of New Castle, Pennsylvania, who donated to the Trustees 
of the College a total of $10,000 for this purpose more than fifty 
years ago. Other gifts and accrued interest together with appropri- 
ations from the general funds of the college have increased the 
total fund. The notes receivable in the fund now total $56,720.82. 

Student Employment — Limited opportunities for students to 
earn money for college expenses are afforded, but under no cir- 
cumstances is it possible for a student to earn all of his expenses. 
The college will not undertake to provide student employment of 
any kind beyond $100 as a total for one year. 

Students may be designated as assistants in the various depart- 
ments of the college, or to work on special projects which may be 
undertaken by members of the faculty. Women students are some- 
times employed for clerical, stenographic, or library work at the 
college, or in kitchen or dining room work at the college dining 
halls. There are occasional opportunities for employment in cer- 
tain of the homes in the village. Men students are often placed in 
maintenance or janitor work at the college. Other opportunities 
open are waiting table, tending furnaces, doing household work, 
etc. 

Applications for student employment must be filed on a proper 
form and must be accompanied by a deposit of $5.00 as a guaran- 
tee of faithful performance. In case work is not obtained the de- 
posit will be refunded. The college is not able to assure any student 
of continuous employment. A careful study of the student's needs 
and general welfare will be made by the committee caring for 
student employment as each application is considered. Applications 
for student employment should be filed with the Executive Secre- 
tary. 

Prospective students should not consider beginning a college 
career unless adequate financial arrangements have been made for 
at least the first year. A few students may find it possible to earn 
enough money to pay part of their expenses. It is advisable, how- 



Bethany College Bulletin 41 

ever, for new students to adapt themselves academically before 
attempting outside work. 

PLACEMENT 

The Admissions and Personnel Office is concerned with place- 
ment service and its facilities are available for students and pro- 
spective employers. It assists students needing to secure part-time 
employment while attending college and those who need to find 
summer work; it helps members of the graduating class who are 
seeking their first positions or making applications for graduate 
fellowships; and it gives as much assistance as possible to alumni 
who keep in touch with the office. The office does not undertake 
to find employment for anyone or to assume the responsibility for 
making all contacts with prospective employers. One of the most 
helpful services which the office is able to render to seniors and 
graduates is that of collecting confidential letters of recommenda- 
tion from the faculty members, academic and personal data, and 
then making these available to employers, graduate schools, etc. 
to which the candidate applies. No charge is made for this service. 

Employers are encouraged to use the Admissions and Personnel 
Office in filling positions and they are assured that their interests 
as well as those of the candidates will be considered. 

Correspondence and personal visits are invited in regard to posi- 
tions for which college trained men and women are desired and in 
regard to summer work which can be done by college students. 
Letters should be addressed to the Recorder or to the Chairman 
of Committee on Placement. 



GRADUATION AND HONORS 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Degrees — Bethany College confers at graduation the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. The fulfillment of the 
several specified requirements and genuine evidence of attain- 
ments in scholastic proficiency are demanded of all candidates for 
degrees. 

Requirement of Hours — Candidates for either of the bacca- 
laureate degrees are required to complete a total of 128 semester 
hours for graduation. Of this number forty semester hours must 
be in courses in the upper division; six semester hours must be 
in physical education, and two semester hours must represent the 
freshman course in orientation or its equivalent. Only twelve hours 
in applied music can be used toward meeting the minimum re- 
quirement. 

Distribution Requirement — Candidates for graduation are 
required to complete certain course work in each of the five cur- 
ricular groups. The more general courses involving greater under- 
standing and integration in each group are recommended. Frag- 
mentary and small unit courses are not desirable. The following 
prescription of course requirements must be met by all candidates 
for baccalaureate degrees: 

Freshman Orientation \ .1 hrs. 

Group I — Languages and Literature 

English composition or literature 6 hrs. 

The requirement in English composition and litera- 
ture may be met by taking courses under the head- 
ing of composition or English 31-32 in the literature 
division on the basis of superior rank in the English 
placement test. 

Foreign language — 

A reading knowledge of one of the foreign languages 
offered at the college or approved by the Committee 
on Admissions. This requirement may be satisfied 
by the completion of the second year course in the 
language at the college level; or by written and oral 
examination given under the direction of the De- 



Bethany College Bulletin 43 

partment of Modern Languages or the Department 
of Classics. 
Group II — Psychology and Education 

Psychology and Education 6 hrs. 

Physical Education, i.e. two hours in personal hygiene 

and four hours in activity courses 6 hrs. 

Group III — Social studies 

History, Political Science, Economics, or Sociology. . . .6 hrs. 
Group IV — Science and Mathematics 

Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics 6 hrs. 

Group V — Religion, Philosophy and Fine Arts 

Biblical literature, i.e., courses in Old and New Testa- 
ment 6 hrs. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must present at 
least forty semester hours from courses in Group IV. Of these 
forty semester hours, at least twenty-five of them must be in the 
upper division. 

AH students will be required to pass a swimming achievement 
test prior to graduation. 

Requirement of Quality Points — Quality points awarded on 
the basis of final grades received are required for graduation. At 
least 128 quality points must be earned and of these at least forty 
must be earned in upper division courses. 

Requirement of Major — The department in which a student 
elects to major shall determine specific requirements for the stu- 
dent, not only of work to be done in the major department but cer- 
tain other work to be done in other departments that must be com- 
pleted to buttress the major. The general outline of requirements 
for each major is listed in the section of this bulletin that carries 
courses of instruction. With the approval of the Dean of the Fac- 
ulty certain modifications can be made to meet the needs of the 
individual student. 

It is expected that no major will include less than 24 semester 
hours and that at least 12 semester hours must be completed in 
courses definitely in the upper division. At least 24 quality points 
must be earned in the major field. These represent the minimum 
for the college. The department offering the major may require 
more than this minimum. In all cases the counselor will expect the 
student to complete a large part of his major work in the upper 
division. 



44 Bethany College Bulletin 

The major may be confined to the work of a single department, 
or related departments may offer "functional majors" embracing 
work in two departments, if the work is planned and administered 
as a homogeneous unit. 

Requirement of Minor — In addition to the major each stu- 
dent must elect a minor subject. The professor in charge of the 
major subject should approve the minor selected. In most cases it 
should have some relationship to the major. At least 18 semester 
hours must be completed in the minor. A minimum of 18 quality 
points is required in the minor. 

Requirement of Examination — A comprehensive examina- 
tion — both written and oral — is required of each candidate for a 
degree at Bethany College. This examination is given by a faculty 
committee under the direction of the professor in charge of the 
major subject, and it is intended to cover the total range of mate- 
rial and accomplishment for an undergraduate major. A student 
failing in the comprehensive examination shall be considered as 
failing to meet the requirements for graduation and shall not be 
graduated. 

Seniors who pass the comprehensive examination with high 
credit shall be awarded their degrees "with distinction" in the 
major subject. The only other grades given are "passed" and 
"failed." 

Seniors who fail to pass the comprehensive examination shall 
upon payment of a suitable fee, be given a second opportunity only 
at the end of any subsequent semester, provided reasonable notice 
has been given to the Committee on Admissions and Classifica- 
tions and the department head. Further opportunity to take this 
examination shall be given only by special vote of the faculty. 

Residence Requirement — Eight semesters are usually re- 
quired to satisfy the requirements for the baccalaureate degree. 
Students of superior quality may satisfy the requirements in less 
time. The senior year should be spent in residence at the college. 

HONORS 

Graduation Honors — Students who have done college work 
of unusual merit and have given evidence of superior academic 
achievement in the upper division will be graduated with honors. 
These are awarded with the degree as Summa Cum Laude, Magna 



Bethany College Bulletin 45 

Cum Laude, and Cum Laude. The awarding of honors is deter- 
mined upon the basis of total quality points earned, standing in 
the comprehensive examination, and the recommendation of the 
professors in charge of the major and minor. 

Seniors who give evidence of superior achievement in the major 
subject and are able to pass the comprehensive examination with 
excellent results will be designated as "Passed with Distinction." 

Class Honors — Upper division students of the college who 
complete the academic work of any one year with a point average 
of 2.5 are recognized for "First Honors" for the year, and those 
who complete the academic work of any one year with a point 
average of 2.25 are recognized for "Second Honors" for the year. 
Lower division students of the college who complete the academic 
work of any one year with a point average of 2.25 are recognized 
for "First Honors" for the year, and those who complete the aca- 
demic work of any one year with a point average of 2.0 are recog- 
nized for "Second Honors" for the year. 

Deans* List — At the end of each semester a list of students who 
have ranked high in academic attainments as attested by academic 
point average are designated for the Deans' List. This distinction 
is determined by the Dean of the Faculty and the Dean of Stu- 
dents. 

Senior Fellowships — Upon careful recommendation certain 
members of the junior class are designated as Senior Fellows dur- 
ing the following year. The selection is made only of students who 
have attained unusual excellence in the field of their major study 
and who by character and ability can do special work in a major 
department, as an assistant in some phase of instruction or re- 
search. The Senior Fellowship carries a small stipend. Not more 
than six senior fellowships are awarded in any one year. 

The selection of Senior Fellows is made from the nominations 
of department heads. It is intended that each Senior Fellow shall 
be given the fullest freedom in his intellectual pursuits and that 
he shall have the benefit of tutorial instruction in the department 
in which he works. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa — This honorary scholastic fraternity was 
organized at Bethany College in 1932. Students are eligible for 
membership under the following conditions: maintenance of a 
quality point average of 2.25 for five consecutive semesters, pro- 



46 Bethany College Bulletin 

vided that in no semester their quality point average falls below an 
average of 2, and, further, students must be recommended by the 
faculty Committee on Honors. 

Pi Gamma Mu — The West Virginia Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma 
Mu is located at Bethany. Its members are selected from students 
who have maintained a high average grade in at least twenty 
semester hours of social studies. 

Anna Ruth Bourne Award — A cup has been given the College 
by an anonymous donor to be known as the Anna Ruth Bourne 
Scholarship cup. The cup is awarded to the sorority or non-sorority 
group on the campus earning the highest scholarship standing each 
semester. The group winning the large cup for four semesters is 
presented with a smaller cup which is a replica of the large cup. 

Pittsburgh College Club Award — The Pittsburgh College 
Club, which comprises the college alumnae of Pittsburgh, has set 
up an award which is made each year to the outstanding girl in the 
junior class. This award is based on academic record, qualities of 
leadership, character, conduct, and general standing on the cam- 
pus. The club has placed a suitable plaque in Phillips Hall on 
which the names of the winners are engraved. In addition, an in- 
dividual award is made each year to the junior girl chosen. 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



INSTRUCTION 



The dominant tone in the instructional activities at Bethany 
College is an emphasis upon the common adventure of students 
and instructors in learning and living. The whole college experience 
is interwoven with opportunities for exchanging ideas, for giving 
and absorbing inspiration, and for all kinds of cordial faculty- 
student relationships. The student is encouraged to find and fur- 
ther himself in the intellectual life and, with the help of faculty 
counselors, to use all of the college resources in terms of valid edu- 
cational objectives. 

The instructional and guidance plan of the college makes it pos- 
sible to treat students as individuals with differences in experience, 
attitudes, and interests. During the first two years, there are fre- 
quent individual conferences for the student with his counselor on 
the progress in courses, projects of study undertaken, and total 
adjustment in academic, vocational, and social matters. During 
the last two years of the college experience independent work and 
self-propelled study are given greater consideration. In regular 
courses the writing of papers upon projects involving independent 
research and critical thinking is emphasized, and conferences upon 
these papers involve close discussion with instructors as to con- 
tent, soundness and effectiveness of the students' work. Special 
problems courses for individual study may be planned for reading 
and research in materials not covered by the formal courses and 
in the laboratories minor research is promoted. Systematic reading 
and independent study of all kinds during the summer as well as 
during the college year, are encouraged and occasionally these 
form part of a student's formal program. 

The college strives to be a democracy of teaching and learning, 
in which the give-and-take of discussion between students and in- 
structors in frequent group conferences, in individual tutorial work 
and in the laboratories, encourages the development of the stu- 
dents' judgment and critical insight. Problems are freely and con- 
cretely discussed in an atmosphere of lively criticism. The char- 
acter of the college plan, a small and select student body and a 
relatively large faculty primarily interested in teaching and coun- 
seling, contribute to effective intellectual activity. 



48 Bethany College Bulletin 

The Academic Council and the Dean of the Faculty give direc- 
tion and supervision to the instructional program of the college. 

LOWER DIVISION 

The college curriculum and general plan of instruction recog- 
nize a lower division and an upper division. The lower division 
represents the traditional freshman and sophomore years, and the 
upper division the traditional junior and senior years. These divi- 
sions reflect the progress and educational growth that is expected 
of students as well as the differences in instructional procedure and 
purpose of the curriculum at the two levels. 

The work of the lower division is intended to complete what is 
usually termed a "general education" and it represents the under- 
girding of the students cultural and academic experience. It is 
based on the belief that the student should become familiar with 
different fields of knowledge and that the program of general edu- 
cation offered in higher institutions should be essentially a contin- 
uation, on a higher level, of academic work in the secondary 
school. Students are urged to elect widely in the instructional de- 
partments of the college. Every major department has survey 
courses for the lower division students. 

One of the chief objectives in the first two years is for the stu- 
dent to discover the field or fields of human achievement in which 
he possesses a marked and sustained interest combined with dis- 
tinct ability. Some of the freshmen know what they want to do in 
college and will have valid reasons for so doing. Others have tem- 
porary enthusiasms, preferences and aversions based upon inade- 
quate school experience. Still others, although of good intellectual 
ability, have no well-defined intellectual purposes or interests. 
Oftentimes there is need to explore the possibilities in several of 
the instructional departments of the college. During either the 
secondary school or college years such exploration is a necessary 
basis for the intelligent choice of a field of major work. In the 
selection of subjects or groups in the lower division, the student 
may be guided somewhat by the nature of the subjects taken in 
the secondary school so that by the close of the second year he will 
have a general acquaintance with several fields of knowledge. 

In the lower division the student usually completes the pre- 
scribed courses for graduation and he may elect some course work 
in a major field. The courses usually elected by freshmen include a 



Bethany College Bulletin 49 

foreign language, science or mathematics, social science, English, 
and physical education. An orientation course dealing with college 
adjustment and vocational selection problems is required as part of 
the freshman year. A general survey examination is given at the 
end of the lower division work. The individual profiles from this 
examination are used for educational guidance. This examination 
is given in cooperation with the program of the Committee on 
Measurement and Guidance of the American Council on Educa- 
tion. 

UPPER DIVISION 

In the upper division all students work directly under the pro- 
fessor in charge of the major subject. The teaching procedures and 
materials give emphasis to individual initiative and concentrated 
work. As far as possible the student's work is library-and-labora- 
tory centered. Extensive reading, problems, and seminars are regu- 
lar procedures in upper division instruction. The development of 
an ability to form thoughtful judgments and evaluations, the "at- 
titude of the searcher," and sustained intellectual interests, are a 
part of the instructional aims at this level. A comprehensive exam- 
ination, oral and written, in the major subject is required near the 
end of the senior year. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Near the end of the senior year, as a final prerequisite to the 
degree, each student is required to pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion — written and oral — in his major subject; this examination 
tests the accomplishments of the student in the whole range of the 
major. The written part of the examination is given in two days 
by the major department. The oral part is given at some desig- 
nated time by a committee selected by the major department from 
the faculty of any accredited college or university. Seniors or any 
other students who wish to take the comprehensive examinations, 
are eligible to do so only upon recommendation of the head of the 
department concerned and the approval of the Dean. Those who 
take the final comprehensive examination are excused from class 
attendance during the reading period and from final examinations 
in courses at the end of the semester in which the comprehensive 
examination is taken. 

A reading period of two weeks is set aside each year for all 
seniors who want to make a final review of materials before the 



50 Bethany College Bulletin 

examination dates. Candidates for degrees are expected, however, 
to use the entire senior year in making a review and synthesis of 
their major work. 

The comprehensive examination is set and graded with the fol- 
lowing points in mind: it should constitute a test of the major 
subject as a whole and shall offer the opportunity to the student 
to show his powers of independent thought in that field; it shall 
not be a test in which the main stress is put on the memorization 
and repetition of facts; it shall not be a test, the passing of which 
is unduly difficult of attainment by students of ordinary intellec- 
tual ability who have honestly attempted the work of synthesizing 
the material of the major subjects; and it shall, at the same time, 
be a test sufficiently searching so that each student may have the 
opportunity of showing to what extent he may have progressed in 
his powers of handling material in his chosen subject. 

STUDENT GUIDANCE 

From the beginning of his college career each student has an 
individual faculty counselor. After the freshman year the coun- 
selor is normally a faculty member in the field in which the student 
is doing his major work. The student has unusual opportunities to 
be in frequent contact with his counselor, and reports of accom- 
plishment and difficulties can be made directly to him. The stu- 
dent-counselor relationship, including in its range the student's 
entire personal and educational development, occupies a signifi- 
cant place in the college plan at Bethany. So far as possible it re- 
places general faculty regulations with an individualized program 
aiming at continuity, correlation and integration of work. These 
counselors, while ministering to all the needs of the student, have 
as their most important function the interpretation and presenta- 
tion of sound educational objectives. 

The counselor is concerned with the student's selection of 
courses, his academic progress, standards of conduct, vocational 
plans and objectives, recreational and social expression. It is hoped 
that in personal counseling with faculty members there may be 
implanted in the student a vivid notion of definite and feasible 
goals toward which he can shape his course and an appreciation 
of the ideals of scholarship and character that belong to the best 
traditions of the academic world. 

The chief officer in charge of student welfare, student guidance 



Bethany College Bulletin 51 

and the coordination of all personnel administration is the Dean of 
Students. His office is intended to unite all the functions and ac- 
tivities which relate themselves to the personal and educational 
development of individual students so that there may be an ade- 
quate understanding of their problems and a planned solution for 
the same. The Dean of Students shares in the counseling activities, 
giving a major part of his time to confronting and dealing with 
individual students and their adjustments to the college experience 
and to the larger society. Students may use his office and staff 
freely in all matters that concern their personal interests and needs 
as well as their educational progress and development. 

The direction of policies related to student welfare, guidance 
and personnel administration, is undertaken by the Council on 
Guidance and Personnel. In some instances members and officers 
of the student body meet with the Council and participate in the 
development of policies and plans. The Council serves as a coordi- 
nating group and its membership includes college officers repre- 
senting the academic, social, health, religious, residence, and ad- 
justment phases of student personnel administration. 









OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION 



The predominant idea in the curriculum at Bethany College is 
to provide sound instruction in the liberal arts and sciences. By 
proper selection of courses a student can prepare himself for vari- 
ous vocational or professional purposes. 

The faculty has authorized the Council on Guidance and Per- 
sonnel to list "suggested curricula" which combine courses offered 
in various departments of the college for the guidance of students. 
These are so planned that they meet the requirements for the 
baccalaureate degree and at the same time serve genuine voca- 
tional objectives. It is not intended that these should be rigid 
requirements but rather the careful judgment of the Council on 
Guidance and Personnel as to how the curriculum can serve in- 
dividual students as they plan for certain post-graduate careers. 

GENERAL PROGRAM 

First Year. In most cases the general requirements for the 
freshman year will fit into the later educational and vocational 
plans for students. Most freshmen should plan to enroll for courses 
about as follows for each semester of the first year. 

English composition or literature 3 hrs. 

Foreign language 3 hrs. 

French, German, Spanish, Greek, Latin 

Introduction to Social Science 3 hrs. 

Orientation 11-12 1 hr. 

Physical Education 1 hr. 

Electives 6 hrs. to 9 hrs. 

Deviations from this program can be made with the advice and 
consent of the faculty counselor because each student is recognized 
as an individual whose training in the past and whose plans for the 
future may differentiate him from his fellows. 

Second Year. All students are strongly urged to complete the 
general course requirements for graduation by the end of the sec- 
ond year in college. The major field must be selected by the end of 
the sophomore year and the foreign language requirement should 
be satisfied. 



Bethany College Bulletin $3 

The graduation requirement in foreign language must be com- 
pleted before the student can become a candidate for a degree. 
Elective courses in philosophy, literature, art appreciation and 
music appreciation are recommended. 

THE NAVY V-12 PROGRAM 

In the war emergency, Bethany College was chosen by the 
United States Navy as one of the institutions to give selected 
young men preliminary training for deck officers, naval aviators, 
doctors, and dentists. Three hundred thirty-five men were as- 
signed to Bethany College, of whom forty were designated to take 
pre-medical and pre-dental training. This unit came to Bethany 
in July, 1943. 

Following will be found the prescribed curricula covering the 
Navy V-12 training offered by Bethany College. The following 
schedule is an excerpt from Navy V-12 Bulletin No. 101, issued 
November 1, 1943, pages 10, 11, and 12. The equivalent courses 
as found in the Bethany College catalogue are indicated in italics. 

SCHEDULE OF PRESCRIBED V-12 CURRICULA 

FIRST COLLEGE YEAR (TERMS 1 AND 2) 

For the first two terms there are two types of curricula: 

1. Curricula 101 (first term) and 201 (second term) are for all 
types of officer candidates, except pre-medical and pre-dental. 



54 Bethany College Bulletin 

CURRICULA ioi AND 201 

Periods per week* 

First term Second term 
Mathematical Analysis I or III, II or IV (Mi or 3, 2 or 4)f 

{Math. 13-14; 15-16 or i?-i8) % . 5 ( S ) 5 ( 5 ) 

English I-II (E1-2) (Eng. 11-12) 3(3) 3(3) 

Historical Background of Present World War I-II (H1-2) 

(Hist. 15-16) 2(2) 2(2) 

Physics I-II (PH1-2) (Physics 31-32) 4(6) 4(6) 

Engineering Drawing and Descriptive Geometry (D1-2) 2(6) 2(6) 

Naval Organization I-II (N1-2) (Naval Org. 17-18) 1(1) 1 ( J ) 

17 (23 ) 17 (23 ) 
Physical Training (PT1-2-3-4-5) J 18(9!) 17 ( 8|) 

35 (323) 34 C31*) 

2. Curricula 102 and 202 are for pre-medical and pre-dental 
candidates only. 

CURRICULA 102 AND 202 

Periods per week* 

First term Second term 

Chemistry I-II (C1-2) (Chem. 11-12) 4(6) 4(8) 

Physics I-II (PH1-2) (Physics 31-32) 4(6) 4(6) 

Mathematical Analysis I or III, II or IV (Mi or 3, 2 or 4) 

(Math. 13-14; 15-16 or 17-18) S(S) S(S) 

Foreign Language I— II (L1-2) (Fr. 11-12; Germ. 11-12; 

Spanish 11-12) 3(3) 3(3) 

Naval Organization I-II (N1-2) (Naval Org. 17-18) 1(1) 1(1) 

17 (21 ) 17 (23 ) 
Physical Training (PTi-2-3- 4 -5)t 18(9^) 17 ( 8^) 

35 (3oi0 34 (31I) 

* Figures in parentheses indicate contact hours per week in class and laboratory. Figures 
outside parentheses indicate the number of meetings per week in class and laboratory. 

t All engineering candidates shall be expected to be qualified for and to complete satis- 
factorily Mathematical Analysis III and IV. 

t First Term Second Term 

PTiA Calisthenics, 20 minutes daily. PT2A Calisthenics, 20 minutes daily. 

PT4 Muster and Inspection, 15 minutes PT4 Muster and Inspection, 15 minutes 

daily. daily. 

PTiB-C-D Conditioning Activities, 5 PT2B Maintenance Activities, 5 hours 

hours weekly (or) weekly (or) 

PT3 Intercollegiate Sports. PT3 Intercollegiate Sports. 

PT5 Military Drill, 1 hour weekly. 



Bethany College Bulletin 55 

CURRICULA FOR DECK CANDIDATES 

D-V(G), D-V(S), C-V(S) 
Total of 4 Terms 

FIRST COLLEGE YEAR (terms 1 and 2) 
Curricula 101 and 201 

SECOND COLLEGE YEAR (terms 3 and 4) 
Curricula 311 and 411 

Periods per week* 
Third term Fourth term 
Elementary Navigation and Nautical Astronomy la, Ila (M8, 9) 

{Math 41-42) 3(3) 3(3) 

Chemistry Ia-IIa, and Engineering Materials (Cia-2a and C6) 

{Chem. ua-i2a) 4(6) 4(6) 

Elementary Heat Power (ME2) J {Physics 64) 3 { S ) 

Electrical Engineering (A) — Elementary (EE2) % {Physics 61) . . • 3 { 5 ) 

Calculus I, II, and Analytical Mechanics! I (M5, 6; Ai) {Math. 

33-34) sis) sis) 

Naval History and Elementary Strategy (N3) {Hist. 47) 3 { 3 ) 

Psychology I — General (PSi) {Psych. 31) 3 { 3 ) 



18 (22 ) 18 (22 ) 
Physical Training (PT 2-3-4) 17 ( 8§) 17 ( 8|) 



3S (305) 3S (3oh) 

Note. — Upon successful completion of the four terms, the candidate will be assigned to 
a Reserve Midshipmen's School for a course 4 months in length. Upon successful completion 
of this course, he will receive a commission as Ensign U.S.N.R. 

* Figures in parentheses indicate contact hours per week in class and laboratory. Figures 
outside of parentheses indicate the number of meetings per week in class and laboratory. 

J Colleges not having engineering departments may substitute comparable courses from 
their regular offerings in the field of Physics. 



56 



Bethany College Bulletin 



CURRICULA FOR PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL 
CORPS CANDIDATES 

MC-V(S), DC-V(S) 
Total of 5 Terms 

FIRST COLLEGE YEAR (terms i and 2) 
Curricula 102 and 202 

SECOND COLLEGE YEAR (terms 3 and 4) 

Curricula 321 and 421 

Periods per week* 
Third term Fourth term 

Chemistry III — Quantitative Analysis (C3) {Chem. 25) 4(8) 

Organic Chemistry I (C4) {Chem. 61) 

Biology I, II (Bi, 2) {Biol. 11-12) ' 4(8) 

Foreign Language III-IV (L3-4) {Fr. 31-32; Germ. 31-32; 

Spanish 31-32) 3(3) 

English I— II (E1-2) {Eng. 11-12) 3 { 3 ) 

Historical Background of Present World War I— II (H1-2) 

{Hist. 15-16) 2(2) 

Psychology I — General (PSi) {Psych. 31-32) 2(2) 



Physical Training (PT 2-3-4) 



18 

17 



26 ) 
81) 



4 


( 8 ) 


4 


( 8 ) 


3 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


2 


(a) 


2 


(a) 


18 


(26 ) 


17 


( m 



35 (34i) 3S (34!) 



THIRD COLLEGE YEAR (term 5 only) 

Curriculum 521 

Periods per week* 
Fifth term 
Biology III (Embryology) or Biology IV (Comparative Anat- 
omy) (B3 or 4) {Biol. 36 6? Biol. 78) 5(9) 

Organic Chemistry II (C5) {Chem. 62) 4(8) 

Foreign Language V or VI (L5 or 6) {Upper Div. Courses) .... 3 { 3 ) 

Psychology II— Abnormal (PS2) {Psych. 58) 3 { 3 ) 

Elective 3 ( 3 ) 



Physical Training (PT 2-3-4) 



18 (26 ) 
17 ( 8|) 



35 (34*) 

Note. — Upon successful completion of the five terms, the candidate may be selected for 
medical or dental training, in which case he will be assigned to an appropriate medical or 
dental school, where he will remain the number of terms necessary to complete that 
school's requirements for a degree in the shortest possible time. 

* Figures in parentheses indicate contact hours per week in class and laboratory Figures 
outside of parentheses indicate the number of meetings per week in class and laboratory. 



Bethany College Bulletin 57 

A number of students assigned to Bethany College for training 
by the Bureau of Navy Personnel had already received one or 
more semesters of college training. Under the Navy regulations 
these students are allowed to continue their college study in the 
field of their major interest meeting only the minimum require- 
ments of Navy training as outlined in Navy V-12 Bulletin No. 101, 
pages 3$ and 36. The same privilege of election of college courses 
is granted to any student "who, in the judgment of the command- 
ing officer and the college authorities, is not qualified for the cur- 
riculum in which he is enrolled, and yet is of such caliber that he 
should be continued in the program, may be transferred to the 
status of students who entered the program with advanced 
standing. However, he will be allowed only the total number of 
terms equivalent to that provided for students taking fully pre- 
scribed curricula for the same type of candidacy. He will be ex- 
pected to meet the minimum requirements outlined on pages 3$ 
and 36, instead of taking the fully prescribed curricula, and shall 
take such other studies as will prepare him for successful work in 
Reserve Midshipmen's School." These requirements are as fol- 
lows: 

1. V-i and V-7 transfers to V-12 and all other students who 
have had college work and enter the V-12 program with one 
or more terms of advanced standing, will continue their edu- 
cation on the following schedule: 

(1) Students who are selected to complete college training 
for the purpose of qualifying them for appointment in 
professional classes of the Naval Reserve will be per- 
mitted to complete additional equivalent terms, so that 
upon graduation they will have completed a total num- 
ber of terms as follows: 

(a) Medical, dental, and chaplain candidates, the num- 
ber of terms necessary to complete the requirements 
for a degree in the shortest possible time. 

(b) Students who are selected for training to qualify 
them for deck, supply, or Marine Corps general 
duty, will be permitted to complete a minimum 
number of additional 16-week terms as follows: 



58 Bethany College Bulletin 



lose who, on entrance into 


Will 


receive 


the V-12 Program 


have 


additional 


completed 








7 






i 


6 






i 


5 






2 


4 






1 


3 






3 


i 






3 


i 






4 



i. Minimal course requirements by type of candidacy. 

(A minimum year course is considered to be the equivalent 
of a course with three class hours per week for at least 30 
weeks.) 

Deck Candidates 
D-V(G), D-V(S), C-V(S) 

Aviation Candidates 

A-V(N) 

Supply Corps Candidates (Business Administration majors) 

SC-V(G) 

English One year 

Mathematics One year, including completion 

of trigonometry 
Physics One year, including laboratory 

Engineering drawing One-half year 

Navigation Desirable 

Medical and Dental Corps Candidates 
MC-V(S), DC-V(S) 

English One year 
Chemistry, including inorganic Two years 

qualitative and organic 

Physics One year, including laboratory 

Biology (one-half year to be One year, including laboratory 

zoology) 

Foreign language Two years (school or college) 



Bethany College Bulletin 59 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Business Administration. As preparation for entering any of 
the occupations in the general field of business or any of the busi- 
ness activities of the government, commercial and regulatory, stu- 
dents can get broad and helpful training by taking their major 
work in economics and business administration. Related courses in 
sociology, political science, mathematics, and psychology should 
be elected. Students considering going into business administration 
or those who wish to prepare for specialized training in graduate 
or technical schools in this field are referred to Professor Gilder- 
sleeve. 

Business Training for Women. Today there are increased op- 
portunities for women in business. These opportunities present 
themselves in the field of commercial teaching, retailing, purchas- 
ing, personnel administration, and various government positions 
requiring secretarial training. Experience has shown that a well- 
rounded academic education provides a background of decided 
advantage in business. The college has organized certain suggested 
programs in the liberal arts which, combined with technical in- 
struction, prepare young women for the fields mentioned above. 
Young women interested in this type of education will take certain 
courses in economics, secretarial science, business administration, 
as. well as courses in the liberal arts in the college. In addition to 
this, opportunities are offered for specialized positions, as secre- 
tarial accountant, medical secretary, legal secretary, and shorthand 
reporter. These latter courses are somewhat more specialized in 
their scope. Young women students interested in business educa- 
tion should consult Miss Eley or Professor Hoagland. 

Secretarial Training. Students who find it necessary may 
prepare for secretarial positions by completing a concentrated 
minimum course of two years. However, it is desirable that wher- 
ever possible students plan their course to cover a four-year pe- 
riod. Students are urged to consider the business training courses 
for women described in a preceding section. Students interested in 
secretarial training should consult Miss Eley. 

Social Work. Fundamental preparation for entering any of the 
various fields of social work carried on by public and private or- 
ganizations is offered in the Department of Sociology. The depart- 
ment offers a major that will prepare students for actual social 
service activities or for graduate and professional work in the field. 



6o Bethany College Bulletin 

Students interested in entering this field should consult Professor 
Paustian. 

Personnel Administration. It is recommended that those who 
are planning to work toward a career in the field of business or 
industrial personnel should major in economics and that those who 
will enter student personnel or guidance work in connection with 
educational institutions should major in some teaching subject 
such as history, science, or English. Courses in education, psy- 
chology, sociology, and biology can provide a good background 
for later study or professional work in this field. Students planning 
to prepare in this field should confer with Dean Kirkpatrick or 
Professor Eliassen. 

Law. Students who are preparing to enter a law school should 
have completed the regular college courses and obtained the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree. Although there are usually no rigid require- 
ments for admission to law schools, the preparation in undergradu- 
ate work should include English composition, public speaking, 
American and English history and psychology. It is also advisable 
for pre-law students to elect courses in economics and political 
science, but they may select their major work in departments not 
included in Group III. Provost Woolery is the adviser for students 
interested in the study of law. 

Public Service. In preparation for a career in public adminis- 
tration or government service a student will best serve his inter- 
ests by acquiring a broad foundation in cultural subjects. With this 
as a basis he may go into specialized work, looking toward research 
or active participation in affairs of the state. His major should be 
in history and political science or economics. Students preparing 
for this work should consult Provost Woolery. 

Medicine. For students who intend to study medicine the col- 
lege offers courses which satisfy the entrance requirements of the 
best medical schools in the country. In keeping with the trend in 
medical education, pre-medical students are advised to select 
courses which not only give some preliminary background for the 
study of medicine, but which also contribute to a broad and liberal 
education. All pre-medical students are advised to complete a four- 
year course. For many years Bethany has been approved by the 
Executive Council of the Association of American Colleges for pre- 
medical training. Dean Weimer is the consultant for students in- 
terested in preparation for the medical or nursing professions. 



Bethany College Bulletin 6i 

Dentistry. All dental colleges require a minimum of one-year 
pre-dental work in a college or university of recognized standing. 
An increasing number of the better dental schools require two 
years of pre-professional training for entrance. Students preparing 
for dentistry should consult Dean Weimer. 

Medical Technology. The American Society of Clinical Pa- 
thologists requires a minimum of two years college training for the 
Registry of Medical Technologists. Students interested in this pro- 
gram should take courses in general biology, bacteriology, general 
chemistry, organic chemistry, and English, with elective courses in 
mathematics, psychology, and sociology. Students entering the 
courses are strongly urged to select a three year program instead 
of the minimum of two years. Attention is further called to the fact 
that many hospitals require degrees before admitting the students 
to the Medical Technology course. Students interested in this field 
should consult Dean Weimer. 

Nursing. The nursing profession today offers more opportun- 
ities to the young woman with a college background than probably 
ever before. Schools of nursing are placing added emphasis on 
broader academic training for the profession. Many schools of 
nursing require at least two years of college training before admis- 
sion and others require three and even four years. In addition to 
courses in general biology, general chemistry, and vertebrate anat- 
omy, students are urged to complete work in the fields of soci- 
ology, psychology, and English. By a proper selection of courses 
it is possible for students to transfer to a course in professional 
nursing in recognized universities offering such courses and com- 
plete their work for combined degrees in education and nursing. 
Students planning to enter the nursing profession should consult 
Dean Weimer. 

Professional Chemistry. By following a planned program of 
courses at Bethany College, one can prepare for a position as chem- 
ist in many governmental or industrial laboratories. For the chem- 
ist, these laboratory positions have far-reaching consequences be- 
yond their immediate worth, since it is common practice for chem- 
ical industries to select from this group trainees for their plant 
operating staffs, their sales departments, and other divisions with- 
in their organizations. During the present emergency, by adopting 
an accelerated program, an especially able student can secure 
enough chemistry, mathematics, and physics to enable him to fill 



62 Bethany College Bulletin 

capably a number of chemical and technical positions in important 
defense industries which would normally require a four-year course 
of college preparation. 

Training for chemical research is quite highly professionalized 
today, and the student who contemplates this should plan to ob- 
tain an advanced degree from some graduate school. An excellent 
undergraduate training is, however, a prerequisite and Bethany 
offers a chemistry program which is entirely adequate for this pur- 
pose. This course of study may also be arranged to fit the con- 
venience of students who anticipate entering the medical, dental, 
and closely allied professions or for those who expect to teach 
chemistry. Students interested in a career in which chemistry is 
basic should confer with Professor Bennett. 

Engineering. The courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, 
English and economics as given in the small liberal arts college 
offer the pre-engineering student a good foundation in engineering 
with the cultural background and the more individualized instruc- 
tion that is usually denied the technical student. Pre-engineering 
students are able to pursue a course of study at Bethany which will 
be acceptable for the first two years of engineering at an engineer- 
ing school. The pre-engineering student should confer with Profes- 
sor Allen in planning his work and in coordinating his pre-engineer- 
ing program with that of the engineering school he has selected. 

Christian Ministry. Students who are preparing for the work 
of the Christian ministry in the mission field or in the church at 
home are urged to major in Religion. Such students will find a 
wide selection of courses offered in this field. Moreover, they 
will pursue their studies in an institution with a rich historical 
background of pioneering in Christian education. In addition to 
courses in Religion, students are urged to complete work in 
fields of English, history, science, philosophy, psychology, and 
social science. With this background it is possible for advanced 
students to secure practical training in the ministry by serving as 
student pastors of the smaller churches around Bethany. 

The college recognizes that adequate preparation for the Chris- 
tian ministry today requires graduate study in an approved school 
of religion or divinity school. The training at Bethany will prepare 
the prospective ministerial student for such advanced training. 
Some men on the basis of their Bethany training accept full time 
pastorates in smaller churches for a year or two before continuing 



Bethany College Bulletin 63 

« 

with graduate work, but all Bethany graduates are urged to plan 
on graduate training at once if possible. Students interested in this 
field should consult Professor Stevenson. 

Journalism. A thorough education in the liberal arts is gener- 
ally regarded as the best foundation for journalism. Students pre- 
paring for journalism or creative English should elect widely all 
courses of the department of English. Electives in political science, 
sociology, history, science, and economics are recommended. Stu- 
dents interested in journalism should confer with Professor Rob- 
erts. 

Education — Training of Teachers. Students who are prepar- 
ing for teaching in secondary schools or for guidance counseling in 
social or educational fields can secure professional training in the 
Department of Education. 

State Recognition. It is possible to qualify for teacher certifica- 
tion in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and other states if 
certification requirements are met. 

High School Teaching. Students who have chosen high school 
teaching as a profession should elect for their major and minors, 
subjects or fields that are taught in modern junior or senior high 
schools. It is also well to consider the current demand for teachers 
in various fields before deciding on teaching majors and minors. 
Several states are now urging that prospective teachers be pre- 
pared in three fields rather than two. Professional requirements for 
teaching certificates in the various states may be met by electing 
proper courses. Prospective teachers are advised to consult Pro- 
fessor Eliassen near the close of the freshman year concerning 
courses necessary to meet requirements of certain states. 

Elementary School Teaching. — The Single Curriculum. Beth- 
any College is introducing a plan of teacher training under the 
sponsorship of the State Department of Education of West Vir- 
ginia which permits a student to qualify for teaching in either the 
elementary field, in the secondary field, or in both. This is referred 
to as the "Single Curriculum" and will meet the requirements for 
teaching in the elementary, or secondary fields in West Virginia 
and Ohio. In other states such as Pennsylvania and New York a 
fifth year or its equivalent will be required to qualify for elemen- 
tary teaching. 

Guidance and Counseling. Students wishing to prepare for 
guidance work in high school may do so by electing the proper 



64 Bethany College Bulletin 

courses. Members of the Department of Education, particularly 
Dean Kirkpatrick, should be consulted for information concerning 
the requirements for guidance certificates in various states. 

Public School Music. Students preparing to supervise or teach 
music in the public schools must pass examination in piano, includ- 
ing the ability to read simple accompaniments at sight and the 
playing of a memorized composition of at least fourth grade ma- 
terial. They must also pass an examination in voice. Professor 
Carter is adviser for students interested in music. 

Physical Education and Recreation. Students who desire to 
prepare for work in school or community programs of physical edu- 
cation and recreation should major in physical education and take 
supplementary work in sociology and related fields. It is possible 
to satisfy the requirements for certification in physical education 
for a teaching major or minor as prescribed for schools in certain 
states. Students preparing for work in the field should consult 
Professor Knight and others in the department. 

Librarianship. Professional training in Librarianship should 
be preceded by a broad educational background especially de- 
signed to meet the needs of the profession. Although the general 
entrance requirements of the accredited library schools include 
only a reading knowledge of French and German, some specializa- 
tion in a subject field, and a certain grade average, librarians 
generally recognize a need for students with a broad education, a 
minimum of subject specialization at the under-graduate level, and 
special training in business administration. A four-year pre- 
professional program has been designed to meet the needs of pro- 
spective library school students. The program includes survey 
courses in the social sciences, the humanities, and the natural and 
physical sciences in addition to business administration and pro- 
cedure, economics, psychology, and courses in the special subject 
field elected by the student. Included in the program is a course 
entitled Introduction to Librarianship and laboratory work in the 
library. Professor Behymer, librarian, is the adviser for students 
interested in Librarianship. 

Graduate Study. Because of being fully accredited and on the 
approved list of the Association of American Colleges, graduates 
of Bethany College are eligible to take advanced work in the 
graduate school of any university. By proper selection of under- 
graduate courses and with adequate methods for scholarly work 



Bethany College Bulletin 6$ 

established, such graduates will be able to go forward in graduate 
study without difficulty. Those working for the master's degree 
should be able to complete the full requirements in, the minimum 
time required by the specific graduate school. For example, a 
student who has majored in economics and business administra- 
tion at Bethany with proper selection of courses, will be able to 
complete the requirements for the master's degree at Wharton 
School of Finance and Commerce of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in one year. About the same situation applies for graduate 
study in any of the fields in which Bethany College offers a major. 
Students who are planning to do graduate study are urged to 
counsel carefully with the head of the Bethany department related 
to their proposed field of study. Only students of marked intel- 
lectual ability and industry are urged to consider graduate study. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Group I — Languages and Literature 

Classics Speech and Dramatics 

Greek Journalism 

Latin Modern Languages 
English French 

Composition German 

Literature Spanish 

Group II — Psychology and Education 

Education Psychology 

Personnel Administration Physical Education 

Group III — Social Studies 

Economics and Business Ad- Political Science 

ministration Library Science 

History and Political Science Secretarial Training 

European History Social Science 

American History Sociology 

Group IV — Science and Mathematics 

Biology Mathematics and Physics 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Geography and Geology Physics 

Group V — Religion, Philosophy and Fine Arts 

Religion and Philosophy Music 

Bible Literature and Theory of 

Church History Music 

Religious Education and Applied Music 

Homiletics Art Appreciation 

Philosophy 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 

Courses of instruction are listed by departments. The 
various departments are arranged according to groups of 
related departments. 

In numbering of courses first semester courses have odd 
numbers and second semester courses, even numbers. A 
course having both an odd and even number, as 1 1-12, runs 
continuously throughout the year, but may be elected for 
either semester unless the course is specifically designated 
"A continuous course," providing the proper prerequisites 
are met. In registering for a course through the year, the 
odd number is used the first semester, and the even, the 
second semester. 

The number in parentheses after the name of the course 
indicates the academic credit given for each semester. The 
names of the instructors follow the description of the 
course. 

The curriculum of the college recognizes the lower and 
upper divisions in the arrangement of courses and the numr 
bers of each course. The lower division covers, roughly, 
the freshman and sophomore years and the upper division, 
the junior and senior years. Courses in the lower division 
are numbered from 1 1 to 49, and in the upper division from 
50 to 92. 

During the period when the college is operating on three 
semesters courses may be offered in any one of the semes- 
ters regardless of the number used. In some cases the same 
course may be offered in all three semesters. It is necessary 
to consult the offerings of the college for each semester to 
determine the courses to be offered at that time. 

A course may not be offered, if elected by less than Hvt 
students. 



FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 

Not more than two semester hours of credit in orientation courses may be offered to 
satisfy the 128 semester hours required for graduation. 

11. College Problems, (i hr.) 

Lectures and readings related to the adjustment of the student to the college experience. 
Methods of intelligent self-directed study; development of social personality; use of books 
and college resources. Required of all freshmen. 

Mr. Barlow and others 

12. Vocational Orientation, (i hr.) 

Survey of certain broad occupational fields; aimed toward a better understanding of the 
world of work and the opportunities in it. Methods for self-appraisal and self-guidance; 
papers and required readings on occupational information. Required of all freshmen. 

Mr. Barlow and others 

NAVAL ORGANIZATION 

Naval Organization 17. (1 hr.) 

Consideration of Naval Etiquette and Customs, Ranks and Insignia, Discipline and Naval 
Law, Organization of Naval Ships, Types and Characteristics of Naval Vessels, Exterior 
Equipment of Ships, and Internal Construction of Ships. Designed to adjust the student 
to Navy procedures. Required of all V-12 students during their first term in the program. 

Lieutenant Peiffer 
Naval Organization 18. (i hr.) 

Study of Naval Forces of the United States, Naval Shore Organizations, Security, Com- 
munications Security, Naval Intelligence Service, Naval Correspondence, Official Reports, 
Navy Regulations, and Navy Publications. Designed to add to the students' functional 
knowledge of Navy organization and methods. Required of all V-12 students during their 
second term in the program. 

Lieutenant (jg) Coughlin 



GROUP I— LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



CLASSICS 
F. R. Gay, Head of the Department 
Aims : 

To develop the ability (a) to read classical Greek and Latin literature with some 
degree of fluency and appreciation; (b) to understand the influence of Greek and Latin 
on modern thought and expression; (c) to prepare students for the teaching of Latin, 
ministerial students for the study of the New Testament; and (d) to provide back- 
ground materials for the student who is interested in linguistics or archaeology. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours in the department with a sequence of twenty hours in either Greek 
or Latin. Each major student must undertake some minor research in either Greek or 
Latin in the problems course. (Classics 91-92.) Students who expect to teach Latin 
will find Greek very important in their undergraduate courses and practically indis- 
pensable for any graduate study of this language. History 6$, English 33-34, English 
53-54, Philosophy 61-62, and Art Appreciation 31-32 are strongly recommended for 
all students majoring in this department. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours are required for a minor. The sequence of courses must be approved 
by the head of the department. History 6^ is recommended. 

Greek 
11-12. Elementary. (3 hrs.) 

The essentials of Attic Greek grammar, and the reading of selections from classical Greek 
literature. A continuous course. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Gay 

51. Xenophon. (3 hrs.) 

The Anabasis. Prerequisite, Greek 11-12. 

Mr. Gay 

52. Plato. (3 hrs.) 

Apology and Crito. Prerequisite, Greek 11-12. 

Mr. Gay 

53-54. Greek Tragedy. (3 hrs.) 

Selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Prerequisite, Greek 11-12. 

Mr. Gay 



yo Bethany College Bulletin 

73-74. New Testament Greek. (3 hrs.) 

The Gospel of Luke and the grammar of the Greek New Testament. In the second semester 
some Pauline Epistles will be studied. Prerequisite, Greek 52 or 54. 

Mr. Green 

Latin 
31-32. Vergil's Aeneid. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, two units of Latin from a secondary school. A continuous course. 

Mr. Gay 

51. Cicero's De Amicitia and De Senectute. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Latin 31-32 or equivalent. Not offered in 1944-45. 



52. Tacitus. (3 hrs.) 

Germania and Agricola. Prerequisite, Latin 51. Not offered in 1944-45. 

$3. Cicero's Letters. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Latin 31-32. 

54. Horace. (3 hrs.) 

Odes and Epodes. Prerequisite, Latin 31-32. 

61. Livy. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Latin 51-52 or 53-54. 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 



62. Plautus and Terence. (3 hrs.) 

The Menaechmi of Plautus and the Phormio of Terence will be critically studied. Pre- 
requisite, Latin 61. 

Mr. Gay 

63-64. Latin Composition. (2 hrs.) 

A course in the writing of Latin especially intended for students who expect to teach the 
subject. Prerequisite, Latin 51-52 or 53-54. 

Mr. Gay 

85. Teaching of Latin. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 



Bethany College Bulletin 71 

91-92. Problems in Classics. 

Subjects, hours, and credits for special study in the classics to be arranged individually 
with the instructor. 

Mr. Gay 

ENGLISH 

Florence M. Hoagland, Head of the Department 

E. E. Roberts, Professor 

Margaret Carrigan, Assistant Professor 

Blandina Foster, Instructor 

Aims: 

Instruction in this department is intended (a) to prepare all students for a more in- 
telligent and appreciative reading of the materials in all branches of knowledge; 
(b) to furnish students with a comprehensive knowledge of the English language and 
literature in preparation for creative writing, graduate study, or as a cultural dis- 
cipline; (c) to provide background and some technical training for students preparing 
for professional writing or journalism, and (d) to train students to speak effectively 
in public. 

Requirement for Major: 

I. Sequence of courses for students who plan to teach English, to prepare for graduate 
study, or to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of the English language and litera- 
ture; English 31-32 and twelve hours in courses numbered above 54 to be approved 
by the head of the department according to the individual needs of the student. 
A minimum of twenty-four hours in literature courses is required for a major. Either 
French or German should be elected to meet the foreign language requirement for 
graduation. 

II. Sequence of courses for students who plan to prepare for journalism, professional 
writing, graduate study, or teaching in journalism: Journalism 53-54 and twelve 
semester hours in journalism courses. English 31-32 must be included and six hours 
in the courses numbered above 54. A minimum of twenty-four hours is required for a 
major. 

Requirement for Minor: 

For students electing a minor under sequence I, at least eighteen hours in the division 
of literature of which six must be in courses numbered above 54. English 31-32 must 
be included. 

For students electing a minor under sequence II, at least twelve hours in the division 
of journalism. English 31-32 must be included. 

For students electing a minor in Speech and Dramatics, at least eighteen hours in the 
division. English 31-32 and English 57-58 are recommended. 



72 Bethany College Bulletin 

Composition 
11-12. Composition and Literature. (3 hrs.) 

First semester: emphasis on fundamentals of composition with writing in various forms. 
Review of grammar. Second semester: greater emphasis on content and style in composition 
and instruction in the technique of preparing a research paper. Vocabulary study. This 
course satisfies Navy V-12, E-i and E-2 requirements. 

Members of the Staff 
Literature 

With the exception of English 31-32, the courses in literature are offered in alternate 
years. 

31-32. English Literature and Its Background. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the masterpieces of English poetry and prose, together with specimens of foreign 
works by which they have been influenced. 

Miss Hoagland 
33-34. Greek Mythology in English Literature, (i hr.) 

No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. The purpose of the course is to furnish 
a background of classical mythology necessary for the interpretation of the English poets. 

Mr. Gay 

51. American Literature to 1900. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of American literature as an aspect of American culture, as a development of 
thought in America, and in relation to the life and literature of the western world. Special 
emphasis on Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Whitman, and Mark Twain. 

Mr. Gay 

53. European Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A reading of some of the most important masterpieces of Greek and Roman literature in 
translation, with a comparison of authors and ideas, and with reference to influences on 
modern thought. Prerequisite, six semester hours in English literature. (Not offered in 
!944-45-) 

Mr. Gay 

54. European Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A reading of some of the most important masterpieces of European Literature in the 
middle ages, the renaissance, and modern times (to the twentieth century). The compara- 
tive method is used as in English $3, with emphasis on influences. Prerequisite, six semester 
hours in English literature. (Not offered in 1944-45.) 

Mr. Gay 

$$. Growth and Structure of the English Language. (3 
hrs.) 

The course will deal historically with the language, its early grammar, its foreign borrow- 
ings. Readings from the poetry and prose of the Old English period. 

Miss Hoagland 



Bethany College Bulletin 73 

56. Chaucer and Middle English. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of Middle English literature. Special study of the Canterbury Tales and some of 
the minor poems which reveal the development of Chaucer's skill. 

Miss Hoagland 
57-58. Shakespeare. (3 hrs.) 

Principal plays of Shakespeare. Four plays will be studied closely each semester; nine or 
ten others will be read more rapidly. 

Miss Hoagland 

59. The Renaissance. (3 hrs.) 

Non-dramatic literature of the English Renaissance will be studied; special emphasis on 
Spenser. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Carrigan 

60. The Seventeenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

From Donne and the metaphysical poets through the age of Dryden. Prose and poetry 
will be studied, special emphasis on Milton. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Carrigan 

61. The Eighteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Interpretation of the literature and social life of the eighteenth century. Emphasis on 
Defoe, Steele and Addison, Pope, Swift, Johnson and his circle. 

Miss Hoagland 

62. The Eighteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Drama: Congreve through Sheridan. Poetry: Collins and Gray through Blake. Novels: 
Selected from Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and Jane Austen. 

Miss Hoagland 
64. The Romantic Period. (3 hrs.) 

The poetry of the romantic movement from 1785 to 1832. Emphasis on Coleridge, Words- 
worth, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Hoagland 
6$-66. Victorian Literature. (3 hrs.) 

The poetry and prose of the Victorian age with emphasis on Carlyle, Browning, and 
Tennyson in the first semester. A study of Arnold, Morris, Swinburne, and Hardy in the 
second semester. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Carrigan 
70-71. Contemporary Literature. (3 hrs.) 

Poetry, novel, and drama. Drama from Ibsen to Odets; poetry from Bridges to MacLeish; 
novel from James to Cather. Prerequisite, six semester hours in English literature, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Miss Hoagland 



74 Bethany College Bulletin 

86. Teaching of English. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 86. 

87-88. Seminar in English Literature, (i hr.) 

A course for advanced students majoring in English. A correlating and supplementing of 
the work done in previous courses. Extensive reading. Of value for the comprehensive 
examination. 

Miss Hoagland and Miss Carrigan 
91-92. Problems in Literature, (i hr.) 

Conferences, papers, and reports on minor research problems. Limited to seniors of superior 
achievement who are majoring in English. 

Miss Hoagland 
Speech and Dramatics 

41. Fundamentals of Speech. (3 hrs.) 

The fundamentals of speech, including tone production and control, platform presence, 
organization of material, and some work in the delivery of extemporaneous speeches. 

Miss Foster 

42. Public Speaking and Debate. (3 hrs.) 

The practical application of the principles of speech. Prerequisite, Speech 41 or permission 
of the instructor. Enrollment limited to twenty students. 

Miss Foster 

50. Oral Interpretation. (3 hrs.) 

Consideration of such forms as monologues, stories, ballads, lyrics, and dramatic poems. 
Principles of analysis, empathy, attention, imagery. 

Miss Foster 

51. Speech Correction, (i hr.) 

Organic and functional causes of speech difficulties. For those who need it. 

Miss Foster 

52. Argument. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles of logic and psychology which underlie the art of persuasion, 
followed by practice in application of the theories developed. Prerequisite, Speech and 
Dramatics 41, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to twenty students. Not 
offered in 1944-1945. 

Mr. Booth 
53-54. Play Production. (2 hrs.) 

To promote an understanding and appreciation of the theatre from the point of view of the 
actor, director, technician, and audience. Practical work in stagecraft, movement, makeup, 
pantomime, etc. Four hours of laboratory. 

Miss Foster 



Bethany College Bulletin 75 

$5-56. Theatre Arts from Athens to Broadway, (i hr.) 

An exposition of the continuity of theatrical development. Outside reading of biographies 
and critical reviews. Critical study of current plays, historical trends, and production 
problems. 

Miss Foster 
57-58. Shakespeare. (3 hrs.) 

See English 57-58. 

59-60. Introduction to Radio Speech. (2 hrs.) 

Practice in radio speaking and dramatics. Preparation of scripts. 

Miss Foster 
61. Radio Speech Practice, (i hr.) 

Two hours of laboratory. 

Miss Foster 

62. CONGREVE THROUGH SHERIDAN. (3 hrs.) 
See English 62. 

70-71. Ibsen through Odets. (3 hrs.) 

See English 70-71. 

72. Play Writing. (3 hrs.) 

See Journalism 72. 

Journalism 
^. Reporting. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the techniques and values in news reporting. Emphasis upon learning to write 
clearly, forcefully, and distinctively. The writing of a daily news story and a weekly feature 
will be required. 

Mr. Roberts 
54. Journalistic Types. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the essay, satire, short story, feature, biography, and magazine article, with 
written work concentrated upon one type to be selected by the student. 

Mr. Roberts 

63. Features. (3 hrs.) 

The writing of twenty special features for magazines and trade journals, and the submission 
of at least ten articles for publication. 

Mr. Roberts 

64. Advanced Features. (3 hrs.) 

The writing of twenty features which must be approved and submitted for publication. 

Mr. Roberts 



y6 Bethany College Bulletin 

6$. Advertising. (3 hrs.) 

A study of department store, financial and business advertising programs, buying motives, 
sales appeals, copywriting, layout, and direct mail. 

Mr. Roberts 
66. History of American Journalism. (3 hrs.) 

Journalistic backgrounds followed by a development of American newspapers and maga- 
zines from colonial days to the present. A parallel study of the rise of advertising. Present 
day trends of news dissemination. Not offered in 1944-45. , 

Mr. Roberts 
71. Short Story. (3 hrs.) 

A study of short story types and the writing of ten short stories. 



72. Play Writing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of modern plays and the writing of eight one act plays. 



Mr. Roberts 



Mr. Roberts 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Pearl Mahaffey, Head of the Department 

Earl D. McKenzie, Assistant Professor 

Margaret R. Woods, Instructor 

Aims : 

The aim of the department is (a) to introduce students to the language, literature and 
culture of France, Germany, and the Spanish speaking countries; (b) to provide train- 
ing in reading facility for students who may be interested in scientific or historical 
study requiring the language as a "tool subject"; and (c) to give adequate training in 
language, literature and expression to students who are preparing to be teachers, 
translators, or representatives in foreign service. 

Requirement for a Major in French: 

Twenty-four hours in French, above French n-12, with eighteen hours in the upper 
division. French 65-66 is required and English 33-34. To be recommended to teach 
any of the modern foreign languages the student must have completed French 85. 

Requirement for a Minor in French, German, or Spanish: 

At least eighteen hours in the same language. 

French 
11-12. First Year French. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, reading and composition. Emphasis on reading. 
For students who have no acquaintance with the language. 

Miss Mahaffey 



Bethany College Bulletin 77 

31-32. Intermediate French. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar review, composition, dictation, intensive and extensive reading. Prerequisite, 
French 12, 2 years in High School, or passing an achievement test. 

Miss Mahaffey 
51-52. Conversation. (2 hrs.) 

A study of prose composition, syntax, and phonetics. Dictation and conversation. Pre- 
requisite, French 31-32. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Miss Mahaffey 
SSS^- Modern Drama. (3 hrs.) L, V, VI. 

French Drama since 17th Century. Prerequisite, a reading knowledge of French. Con- 
ducted in French. 

Miss Mahaffey 
61-62. Novel. (3 hrs) 

The French Novel from its beginning to the 20th century. Prerequisite, a reading knowl- 
edge of French. Conducted in French. 

Mr. McKenzie 
65-66. Survey of French Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of French literature from the early periods to the present time. Not offered in 
1944-45- 

Miss Mahaffey 

71. Seventeenth Century Drama. (3 hrs.) 

Plays of Corneille, Racine and Moliere. Conducted in French. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. McKenzie 

72. Nineteenth Century Poetry. (3 hrs.) 

Schools of poetry, Romanticism, Parnassian and Symbolism. Conducted in French. Not 
offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. McKenzie 
82. Seminar for Major Students. (2 hrs) 

Intensive review of French civilization and culture. Readings and discussions in French. 

Miss Mahaffey 
85. Teaching of Modern Languages. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 



78 Bethany College Bulletin 

German 
11-12. First Year German. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of grammar, composition and reading with emphasis on reading and speak- 
ing. For students who have no acquaintance with the language. 

Mr. McKenzie 
31-32. Intermediate German. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar composition, intensive and extensive reading. Special emphasis on outside read- 
ing in student's major or minor field. Prerequisite, German 12 or satisfactory standing in 
achievement test. 

Mr. McKenzie 
51-52. Conversation. (2 hrs.) 

Practical conversation, study of syntax, dictation. Admission on approval of instructor. 

Mr. McKenzie 

57-58. Nineteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Reading and critical study of the nineteenth century, especially Kleist, Hebbel, and Keller. 
Special emphasis on the drama and Romantic school. This class is conducted in German. 
Prerequisite, German 31-32 or equivalent. Not offered in 1944-45. 

67. Eighteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Reading from Lessing, Goethe, Schiller. Conducted in German. Prerequisite, German 32. 

Mr. McKenzie 
91-92. Problems in German Literature. (3 hrs.) 

Special work in various fields of German literature. 92 offered in Nov. 1944. 

Mr. McKenzie 
Spanish 
11-12. First Year Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, composition and reading, with considerable 
emphasis on spoken Spanish. For students who have no acquaintance with the language. 

Miss Woods 
31-32. Intermediate Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar, oral work and reading. Practice in dictation, writing and speaking. Prerequisite, 
Spanish 12 or satisfactory rating in achievement test. 

Miss Woods 
52. Commercial Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Study of business and commercial Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 32, or permission of 
instructor. Offered in March 1945. 

Miss Woods 



GROUP II— PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION 



EDUCATION 
R. H. Eliassen, Head of the Department 
F. H. Kirkpatrick, Professor 
Aims : 

The Department of Education seeks to develop in all students a wholesome and 
intelligent attitude towards public education; to stress a thorough understanding of 
human growth and development; to cultivate thinking about problems in education; 
to integrate its work with that of other departments in a well rounded liberal and pro- 
fessional education of prospective teachers who may qualify for teaching in Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and neighboring states; and to offer background and 
some technical preparation for types of guidance and personnel work. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of twenty-six hours in the department, with a sequence of courses ap- 
proved by the head of the department. Three hours of general psychology are re- 
quired. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Twenty hours in the department. 

Teacher Training: 

Students who are interested in teaching should confer with the head of the Depart- 
ment of Education as early as possible, preferably during the freshman year and not 
later than the beginning of the upper division work. Such a conference or series of 
conferences seek to help the student acquire an understanding of the teaching pro- 
fession, the opportunities in various fields of teaching, the requirements for certifica- 
tion in the various states, and the personal qualities considered esssential for successful 
teaching. 

31-32. Human Growth and Development. (3 hrs.) 

A careful study of the individual through childhood and adolescence. An important part 
of the course will be the study of the nature and direction of learning, laws of learning, 
factors in learning, transfer of training, and individual differences. Materials and evidence 
from biology, psychology, sociology, and other subjects will be drawn upon. Actual first- 
hand study of children will be stressed including case studies and field experiences. This 
course may be taken to satisfy the requirements for Introduction to Education and Educa- 
tional Psychology. 

Mr. Eliassen and others 
42. Educational Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 42 or Education 32. 



80 Bethany College Bulletin 

46. West Virginia Geography, Government, and History. 
(3 hrs.) 

This course gives the important background for the "Mountain State." Not offered 
1944-45- 



51. History and Philosophy of Education. (3 hrs.) 

A general survey of educational theory and practice from the days of Ancient Greece to 
the present day. The pivotal aim of the course is to secure an understanding of contem- 
porary education through a survey of the educational thinking of great leaders of educa- 
tional thought past and present. 

Mr. Eliassen 

52. Principles of Education. (3 hrs.) 

Stresses social and economic principles that govern education in America as well as the 
immediate and ultimate aims to be realized. Important issues and trends receive em- 
phasis. A minimum of six observations in secondary schools is required. 

Mr. Eliassen 
55. Statistical Methods. (2 hrs.) 

Elementary methods of handling quantitative data in educational or psychological studies. 
Frequency distribution, nature of measurement, central tendency, variability, zero-order 
correlation, and simple graphic methods. Some attention to test scaling, multiple pattern 
scores, and sampling error theory. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
57. Human Adjustment. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 57. 

61. Educational Measurement. (3 hrs.) 

Techniques for the measurement and evaluation of educational competence and develop- 
ment. Construction, validation, use, and interpretation of tests, rating scales, and inven- 
tories. Standard measurements of achievement, interests, attitudes, and special abilities. 
Elementary methods of handling quantitative data in educational or psychological studies. 
Interpretation of test scores and ability patterns. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 

62. Mental Measurements. (2 hrs.) 

See Psychology 62. 

6$. Visual and Auditory Education. (2 hrs.) 

Emphasis on special materials and methods of visual and auditory education including 
motion pictures and radio. Problems of selection, integration, and evaluation will be 
stressed. 

Mr. Eliassen 



Bethany College Bulletin 8i 

72. Educational and Vocational Guidance. (2 hrs.) 

General introduction to functions and procedures related to vocational and educational 
guidance. Major objectives, interrelations, assembling information regarding occupations, 
inventory of the individual, counseling and records, interests and aptitudes, organization 
plans. 

Mr. Eliassen or Mr. Kirkpatrick 

73. Primary Methods. (2 hrs.) 

A study of procedures and methods as they apply to the primary grades with special em- 
phasis on new practices that have proved effective. Not offered in 1944-45. 



74. Educational Administration. (2 hrs.) 

Study of federal, state, and local administration of the schools. Functions of the board of 
education, superintendent, principal, and the teacher are stressed. Special consideration 
will be given to personnel problems of students and teachers. A minimum of six observa- 
tions in some school system is required. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Eliassen 

75. Integrated Methods. (3 hrs.) 

A study and laboratory course in procedures and methods as they apply throughout the 
public schools from intermediate grades through the secondary schools. Not offered in 
1944-45- 

Mr. Eliassen and 

81 or 82. Observation and Directed Teaching. (6 hrs.) 

This course is offered each semester and includes observations, participation activities, 
and student teaching under supervision in the public schools. Two group conferences are 
scheduled for each week and these are supplemented by individual conferences with critic 
teachers and the instructors in charge of the course. Each student will spend at least one 
period a day during the semester, teaching and observing. Students should not register 
for more than 16 semester hours of work during the semester in which this course is carried. 

Mr. Eliassen, , and Critic Teachers 

85 or 86. Special Methods. (2 or 3 hrs.) 

Many departments of the college offer courses in the teaching of the corresponding sec- 
ondary school subjects. These courses present the most approved methods in teaching 
subjects at the secondary school level. Such courses are open only to juniors and seniors 
who expect to teach. The following special methods courses are offered: 
Latin 85 History 85 Chemistry 85 

English 86 Sec. Tr. 85 Mathematics 86 

French 85 Biology 85 Physics 85 

Physical Education 85 

Mr. Eliassen and others 



82 Bethany College Bulletin 

85-86. Public School Music. (3 hrs.) 

See Music 85-86. 

85-86. Public School Art. (3 hrs.) 

This is largely a laboratory course devoted to techniques and procedures in applied arts 
to prepare teachers for directing art activities in the modern school. Not offered in 1944-45. 



91 or 92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Independent study and investigation in the field of professional education. Open only to 
students of unusual ability and adequate background in the field of education. 

Mr. Eliassen and Mr. Kirkpatrick 
93. Post- War Educational Reconstruction. (2 hrs.) 

Critical review of various plans for educational reconstruction in Europe and America at 
the close of the War: the relationship between, political, social, and educational re-adjust- 
ments and changes; specific steps toward realization of new educational goals. 

Mr. Eliassen and others 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 

Aims: 

To give professional insight and understanding of personnel administration and labor 
relations. The courses are for students who plan to work in some phase of personnel 
administration or who want an understanding of the general field. 

^. Labor Problems. (3 hrs,) 

A study of the position of the wage earner in modern industrial society. Historical back- 
ground of various labor problems; trade unionism; collective bargaining; labor legislation; 
problem of income; quest for security. Prerequisite six hours in Economics and Business 
Administration. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
54. Personnel Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Procedures, activities, and evaluation of personnel administration in business and indus- 
try. Selection and placement; job analysis and classification; training and promotion; 
morale; safety; records and controls. Prerequisite six hours in Economics and Business 
Administration and six hours in Psychology. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
SS- Practicum. (2 hrs.) 

On-the-job experience in some phase of personnel administration under a planned pro- 
gram. Must be taken in summer vacation or in semester when student is not in residence. 
Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 



Bethany College Bulletin 83 

6$. Industrial and Business Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 6$. 

74. Seminar on Personnel Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Independent study and conference reports on projects in specific areas of personnel ad- 
ministration, i.e., industrial, retail, governmental, etc. Study of techniques, policies, 
trends, and current issues. Open only to students who have professional interest and 
competence. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Andrew Leitch, Head of the Department 
Aims: 

Psychology is intended to acquaint the student with the facts and laws of behavior, 
especially human behavior — physical and mental, normal and abnormal — and with 
the experimental and scientific approach to problems in this field. The courses offered 
are designed (a) to enable the student to develop a wholesome personality and to 
make adequate social adjustments; (b) to give background preparation for professions 
which relate to individual and group behavior; (c) to equip the student in an elemen- 
tary way for practical work in mental measurements, personnel analysis, and applied 
fields; and (d) to lay a broad foundation for graduate work and professional study in 
this or some related field. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four hours of psychology, which must include Psychology 31-32, 42, 
53, 62, 64, and 75. A major should also include Biology 11-12 and Education 5$. 
Biology 43, and Sociology 31-32 are recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen hours of psychology, which must include Psychology 31-32, $3, 62, 
and 64. Education $$ is recommended. 

31-32. General Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

An introductory course providing a systematic study of the most important facts and 
laws of behavior and mental life. Emphasis on their practical significance in the profes- 
sions, business, industry, and personal life. Laboratory demonstrations. This course satis- 
fies Navy V-12 PS-i requirement for pre-medical and pre-dental students. 

Mr. Leitch 
42. Educational Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the nature and laws of learning; original nature as conditioning learning; the 
amount, rate, limit, and permanence of improvement; factors and conditions affecting 
learning; transfer of training; mental fatigue; individual differences; efficient methods of 
study. Prerequisite, Psychology 31, preferably Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 



84 Bethany College Bulletin 

43. Introduction to Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

An elementary course designed to introduce the student to the field of Psychology, its 
methods, problems and applications. Such topics as individual differences, aptitudes, 
motivation, personality adjustments, mental measurements, etc. will be studied. This 
course satisfies the Navy V-12 PSi requirement. 

Mr. Leitch 
$3. Experimental Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A laboratory course in which the student carries on a series of typical psychological ex- 
periments in sensory, motor, intellectual, and emotional processes. Students electing Psy- 
chology S3 should continue with Psychology 62 and 64. Prerequisite, six semester hours of 
psychology. 

Mr. Leitch and assistant 
54. Applied Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A general course treating the application of psychological principles to problems in the 
fields of business, industry, and the professions. Prerequisite, six semester hours in psy- 
chology. 

Mr. Leitch 
$$. Social Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A systematic study of the behavior of the individual in his social relationships, with especial 
attention to the significance of motives and attitudes; problems related to adequate and 
inadequate social adjustments. Prerequisite, six semester hours in psychology. 

Mr. Leitch 

57. Psychology of Personality. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the phenomena of personality with especial attention to the psychology of ad- 
justment — basic human drives, factors affecting personality formation in childhood and 
adolescence, adequate and inadequate personality adjustments, readjustment, the develop- 
ment of a wholesome well-adjusted personality. Prerequisite, six semester hours in psy- 
chology. 

Mr. Leitch 

58. Abnormal Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A systematic study of mental deficiency, the neuroses, the psychoses (insanity), and ab- 
normal traits in everyday life. Study trips to nearby special classes and institutions for 
mental cases. Prerequisite, six semester hours in psychology. This course satisfies Navy 
V-12 P-2 requirement. 

Mr. Leitch 

59. Child and Adolescent Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, moral, and religious development of 
the individual in infancy, childhood and adolescence, with especial reference to the more 
serious problems of children and adolescent youths. Prerequisite, six semester hours of 
psychology. 

Mr. Leitch 



Bethany College Bulletin 85 

62. Mental Measurements. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the more important techniques for the measurement of mental capacity, with 
especial attention to intelligence, special aptitudes and personality. The use of tests in 
education, in business and industry, in rehabilitation work, and in out-of-school agencies. 
Prerequisite, six semester hours in psychology. 

Mr. Leitch 

64. Mental Testing and Diagnosis, (i hr.) 

A laboratory course in which the student has an opportunity to learn the techniques of 
individual and group mental testing. Emphasis on interpretation of test results, evaluation 
of tests, classification and diagnosis. A companion course of Psychology 62. 

Mr. Leitch 

65. Industrial Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

General treatment of the applications of psychology to problems in the industrial and 
business world. Personnel selection, classification, training, fatigue, motivation, morale, 
and occupational adjustments. Prerequisite, six semester hours in Psychology. Not offered 
in 1944-45- 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
75. Contemporary Schools of Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the historical development and an evaluation of some of the more important 
trends and schools of contemporary psychology, such as introspectionism, behaviorism, 
psychoanalysis, Gestalt, etc. Limited to juniors and seniors offering Psychology 31-32 or 
equivalent as prerequisite. 

Mr. Leitch 
91-92. Problems, (i hr.) 

An advanced course in which the student may either (a) carry on some minor psychological 
experiment; or (b) review the literature related to some field of investigation in psychology; 
or (c) study some problem in psychological research. Limited to senior majors. May be 
selected only with the approval of the head of the department. 

Mr. Leitch 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

J. J. Knight, Head of the Department 

Arnold G. Nicholsen, Instructor 

Grace K. Benedict, Instructor 

Aims: 

It is the aim of the department of physical education and health (a) to promote the 
health education and physical development of the student; (b) to provide opportuni- 
ties for students to participate in and secure a reasonable degree of proficiency in 
physical recreation activities; and (c) to train physical education and play leaders for 
educational, industrial, and community situations. 



86 Bethany College Bulletin 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of thirty hours which should include the following courses: Physical 
Education 15 or 1 6, 37, 67, 77, and 85. Sociology 31, Psychology 31-32, and Education 
31-32 are recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

A minimum of twenty hours in the department with the sequence of courses approved 
by the head of the department. 

Requirement for All Students: 

Freshmen — Physical Education 11-12 is required. Physical Education 15 or 16 may 
be elected in the freshman year. 

Sophomores — Physical Education 25, 26 is required of all students, but permission 
may be granted to substitute equivalent hours from courses 21, 22; 23, 24; 3$, 36; 
45, 46; 51, 52; or work in varsity athletics. Physical Education 15 or 16 is to be taken 
before the end of the Sophomore year. 

A season's work in varsity athletics, i.e., football, basketball, track, baseball and 
tennis is credited with one hour of physical education provided proper course regis- 
tration is made. Only two physical education hours may be obtained through varsity 
athletics. 

All students are required to present four hours of credit in Physical Education for 
graduation which must include Physical Education 11, 12 and 25, 26 or approved 
substitute courses. Not more than a total of four hours credit toward graduation will 
be allowed from courses 11, 12, 25, 26 and varsity athletics. 

All students will be required to pass a swimming achievement test prior to graduation. 
Students who are physically unfit as certified by the college physician may petition 
to be allowed to substitute hours in other courses in lieu of activity courses in physical 
education. Students who are not candidates for a degree may be exempt from the 
requirement in physical education. Any petition for exemption from physical education 
should be addressed to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. 

11-12. Freshman Physical Education, (i hr.) 

Outdoor and indoor activities adapted to the abilities of the students will be taught. 
Instruction in the techniques and rules of a wide variety of individual and team games. 
Required of all freshmen. An activity course. 3 periods per week. 

Mr. Nicholsen and Miss Benedict 
15 or 16. Personal Hygiene. (2 hrs.) 

Fundamental knowledge of personal hygiene and how the health of the individual may be 
conserved. Especially for freshmen and sophomores. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
21-22. Tap and Character Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practical course starting out with elementary tap steps and combinations working up to 



Bethany College Bulletin 87 

finished routines and dances. Open to men and women. An activity course. 1 periods per 
week. 

Miss Benedict 
23-24. Folk Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practice course in folk dancing from many countries. English and American country 
dances are studied during the first semester and European folk dances during the second 
semester. Open to men and women. An activity course, i periods per week. 

Miss Benedict 
25-26. Sophomore Physical Education, (i hr.) 

A practice course dealing with individual and team sports. For sophomores who desire to 
elect a general recreation course. An activity course. 3 periods per week. 

Mr. Nicholsen and Miss Benedict 
31. Scouting, (i hr.) 

Fundamentals of scouting. Elements of scout leadership, troop and pack management, 
program planning, camping, etc. A practical course involving experience with the local 
troop and occasional visits to Camp Bethany. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Nicholsen 



32. Community Hygiene. (2 hrs.) 

A study of health matters pertaining to the social group. 



Miss Benedict 



34. Camping and Outdoors, (i hr.) 

See Biology 34. 

3$. Elementary Swimming, (i hr.) 

Instruction for beginners in buoyance and floating. Preliminary tests for swimming, and 
such strokes as elementary back, side, and crawl. An activity course. 1 periods per week. 

Mr. Nicholsen and Miss Benedict 

36. Advanced Swimming, (i hr.) 

Instruction in the correct form of the more advanced strokes as the trudgen, American 
crawl, racing back, and breast. Diving and life-saving. Prerequisite, Physical Education 3$ 
or equivalent. An activity course. 1 periods per week. 

Mr. Nicholsen and Miss Benedict 

37. Playground Management. (3 hrs.) 

Instruction in playground management, group games, relays, stunts, and rhythmic activi- 
ties for elementary children. Two hours of theory and one hour of practical work. 

Miss Benedict 
39. Prevention and Care of Injuries. (2 hrs.) 

Common hazards of play and athletics with a study of preventive measures and treat- 



88 Bethany College Bulletin 

ment of injuries. Red Cross First Aid Certificate may be earned by those who pass the 
examination. 

Mr. Nicholsen and Miss Benedict 

45. Tumbling and Stunts, (i hr.) 

Practice course beginning with individual stunts and advancing to more intricate work. 
An activity course. 1 periods per week. 

Mr. Knight 

46. Gymnastics and Apparatus, (i hr.) 

A survey course of various gymnastic systems and practice in apparatus. An activity 
course. 1 periods per week. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Knight 
47-48. Theory and Practice of Team Sports, (i hr.) 

Intensive practice with opportunity for officiating in team sports. Sports for men: touch- 
football, soccer, speedball, volleyball, basketball and baseball. Sports for women: hockey, 
soccer, speedball, volleyball, basketball, and baseball. 3 periods per week. 

Mr. Nicholsen and Miss Benedict 
50. Social Dancing, (i hr.) 

Instruction in the modern social dance steps. 

Mr. Nicholsen 
51-52. Modern Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practice course in contemporary dancing, emphasizing the use of fundamental expressive 
movements in creative work. An activity course. 1 periods per week. 

Miss Benedict 
$3. Coaching Football. (2 hrs.) 

A study of fundamentals, offensive and defensive styles of play, conditioning players, rules 
of the game and officiating. 

Mr. Knight 
54. Coaching Basketball. (2 hrs.) 

A study of fundamentals, offensive and defensive types of play, rules and officiating. The 
place of basketball in the intramural program. 

Mr. Knight 
56. Baseball, Track and Field. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the strategy and fundamentals of baseball, track and field. 

Mr. Knight 
58. Community Recreation. (2 hrs.) 

Leisure and its meaning, education for leisure, effect of leisure on personality, recreation 
and social maladjustment, recreational movements and activities in the United States and 
foreign countries. 

Miss Benedict 



Bethany College Bulletin 89 

67. Physiology. (3 hrs.) 

See Biology 67. 

70. Kinesiology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of fundamental bodily movements, with inquiry as to how they are performed, 
their reaction on the body, and their relation to bodily development and efficiency. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 36 and Biology 67. 

Mr. Nicholsen 
72. Corrective Gymnastics and Normal Diagnosis. (2 hrs.) 

A study of variations of the normal types of the human organism at different age levels. 
Therapeutic measures will be evaluated, especially those which refer to the correction of 
mechanical defects. Prerequisite, Biology 36 and Biology 67. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Nicholsen and Miss Benedict 

74. Organization and Administration of Physical Educa- 
tion. (3 hrs.) 

This course deals with administrative relationships and procedures in the conduct of 
physical education. For advanced students who are majoring or minoring in the depart- 
ment. 

Mr. Knight 

76. Theory and Practice of Individual Sports. (2 hrs.) 

Intensive practice in badminton, handball, archery, tennis, and golf. A study of the rules 
for each and of methods used in teaching. Open to men and women. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Benedict 

77. History and Principles of Physical Education. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the development of physical education from ancient times to the present. A 
study of the principles underlying physical education and its educational content. For stu- 
dents majoring or minoring in the department. 

Mr. Knight 
85. Methods of Health and Physical Education. (3 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

For advanced students of unusual ability in physical education who can undertake special 
problems for study or who are prepared to develop and project a program. Not offered in 
1944-45- 

Physical Education Staff 
Equipment: 

Men and women taking activities courses in physical education must wear regulation 



go Bethany College Bulletin 

gymnasium apparel. For the men this consists of basketball or gymnasium shoes, 
white socks, white gymnasium shirt, pants, and sweat suit. For the women the regu- 
lation costume consists of a green and white washable suit, sweat shirt, white sneakers, 
and socks, purchased through Bethany College Book Store. 

NAVY V-12 PHYSICAL TRAINING PROGRAM 

A general conditioning and maintenance program in physical 
education is required of all students enrolled in the Navy V-12 pro- 
gram. Certain parts of this program are under the direction of the 
members of the college faculty cooperating with the members of 
the Navy staff at the college. Other parts are under the direct 
supervision of the members of the Navy staff. The college allows 
the substitution of these courses in lieu of its requirements in 
Physical Education. 

17. PTi. Basic Training Program. (Required during the 
first term.) (1 hr.) 

Daily 20-minute morning program of calisthenics and running. General conditioning, 
swimming, combative and competitive conditioning activities. 5 periods per week. 

18. PT2. Maintenance Training Program. (Required each 
term after first term.) (i hr.) 

Daily 20-minute morning program of calisthenics and running. Swimming, organized com- 
petitive sports, and general conditioning. The Maintenance Training Program will be 
checked by the Navy Standard Physical Fitness Test. 5 periods per week. 

PT3. Seasonal Intercollegiate Sports Program, (op- 
tional.) (1 hr.) 

Enlisted students in the V-12 program, except first year first term students, may par- 
ticipate in intercollegiate sports provided there is no interference with their prescribed 
hours or courses of study. 

Students taking part in inter-collegiate athletics also shall participate in the daily 20-min- 
ute morning program and the swimming program. First term upperclass transfers shall 
take military drill. All other elements of the physical training program are to be omitted 
during the period of participation in inter-collegiate athletics. 

PT4. Inspection Period. (Fifteen minutes daily.) 

PT5. Instruction in Basic Company Movements (not under 
arms.) 

One hour per week during students' first term. 



GROUP III— SOCIAL STUDIES 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

21-22. Introduction to the Social Studies. (3 hrs.) 

A general survey of the social sciences for freshmen, devoted to the study of human insti- 
tutions and their current problems. 

Mr. Woolery and Mr. Barlow 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Burton H. Gildersleeve, Acting Head of 
the Department 

Aims: 

The courses are designed (a) to give an understanding of the principles involved in 
economic behavior, of the relationships and process of the modern economic system, 
and of the relationships between this system and government; (b) to develop ability 
in the analysis of economic problems; (c) to furnish a basis for intelligent citizenship 
in dealing with the complex socio-economic problems; (d) to equip the student with 
fundamental and some technical preparation for business; (e) to stimulate sound 
thinking, reliable judgment, and timely action which are so vital to business leader- 
ship; (f) to encourage an aptitude for business-like habits of thought and study which 
will make for continuing growth and progress; and (g) to provide preparation for 
teaching economics and for post-graduate or professional study. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four semester hours of which eighteen hours must be upper division courses* 
The major must include Economics 45, 47, 51, 83, and at least one semester of Eco- 
nomics 91-92. Students planning to do a considerable amount of work in the depart- 
ment should take the freshman survey course, Introduction to the Social Studies, 
and should not elect Economics 43-44 as a sophomore course, unless the quality of the 
work done in the survey course was unsatisfactory. Students who wish to specialize in 
certain fields, e.g., accounting, merchandising, management, or to combine secretarial 
training with business courses, should work out a program in consultation with the 
head of the department, so that an appropriate sequence of courses may be assured. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen semester hours in an approved sequence are required for a minor in the de- 
partment. Nine hours must be in upper division courses. Those who plan to complete 
a minor in the department are advised to elect the freshman survey course, Introduc- 
tion to the Social Sciences, if at all possible; otherwise, to begin their work in the 
department with Economics 43-44. 



92 Bethany College Bulletin 

34. Economic Geography. (3 hrs.) 

See Geography 34. 

43-44. Principles of Economics. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the nature, scope and organization of economic activities in our modern society, 
fundamental principles and policies involved and their application to contemporary prob- 
lems. Not open to freshmen. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

45. Elementary Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Elementary principles of accounting and their application to the sole proprietorship. Meth- 
ods of collecting, recording and reporting accounting information. Class and laboratory 
work. Not open to freshmen. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

46. Intermediate Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Further application of the principles covered in Economics 45; summary records, controll- 
ing accounts, partnership problems, corporation problems. Class and laboratory work. 
Prerequisite, Economics 45. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

47. Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

Elementary statistical methods in handling economic and business data; the logic and 
validity of statistical methods as applied to both theoretical and practical problems, in- 
cluding the technique of tabulation and graphic presentation; index numbers; interpreta- 
tion and use of statistical presentation. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. 

51. Money and Banking. (3 hrs.) 

Historical development of our present monetary system and banking institutions; functions 
of money, and the various types of monetary standards; the nature of bank credit; The 
Federal Reserve System; price levels and the business cycle; inflation in war-time. Pre- 
requisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 
52- Labor Problems. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the position of the wage earner in modern industrial society, the background 
of industrial relations, and such problems as wages and income, hours of work, unionism 
and collective bargaining, strikes, employer activities, insecurity and labor legislation. Pre- 
requisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. 

54. Insurance. (3 hrs.) 

Functions of the more important types of insurance through an analysis of their principles 
and practices. Life insurance and the various forms of property insurance. Prerequisite, 
Economics 43-44. 

Mr. 



Bethany College Bulletin 93 

55. Public Finance. (3 hrs.) 

Theories and principles of taxation; practical financial problems of federal, state and local 
governments; public expenditures; taxes and other public revenues; public debt, methods 
and effects of borrowing; fiscal organization and administration; budgets and reforms. Pre- 
requisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

61. Business Administration. (3 hrs.) 

The organization and management of business enterprise. This course serves those stu- 
dents who wish a general survey of the structure, functions and techniques of business 
activities. 

Mr. 

62. Marketing. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the marketing institutions, methods, trends and social and economic factors which 
influence these institutions; the channels of trade, the methods and costs of marketing, 
the nature and effects of competition in marketing; market policies, promotion and opera- 
tions. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. 

63. Advanced Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Theory and practical application involving problems of valuation of assets and liabilities, 
reserves, depreciation, capital accounts and profits, dividends, corporate consolidation. 
Prerequisites, Economics 45 and Economics 46. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

64. Cost Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

General methods of collecting costs of material, labor, and burden and incorporating them 
in the books of account; operation reports and cost statistics; interpretation of cost data 
for commercial and industrial organization; elimination of waste through proper costing. 
Prerequisites, Economics 45 and Economics 46. 

Mr. 

65. Business Law. (3 hrs.) 

Study of a person's rights and obligations which relate to the usual business transactions. 
Stress is laid upon the elements of contracts, sales, agency relationships, negotiable instru- 
ments, property, corporations, bankruptcy and courts and court procedure. Prerequisite, 
Economics 43-44. 

Mr. 

68. Corporation Finance. (3 hrs.) 

Financial management of corporate enterprise; aspects of promotion, current administra- 
tion, expansion, failure and reorganization, operation of the stock market, and security 
regulation. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 



94 Bethany College Bulletin 

83. Advanced Economic Theory. (3 hrs.) 

A study of economic terms, and value and distribution theory. Money and prices, business 
cycles and full employment are stressed. Open to juniors and seniors only. Prerequisite, 
Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 
91-92. Seminar in Economics. (2 hrs.) 

Emphasis on independent study. Members may study problems in theoretical or applied 
economics in which they are particularly interested and in accordance with individual 
needs and preparation. Limited to seniors majoring or minoring in economics. Group meet- 
ing and individual conferences. Prerequisite, at least 15 semester hours in the department. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

W. K. Woolery, Head of the Department 

Chandler Shaw, Assistant Professor 
Charles C. Barlow, Assistant Professor 

Jay M. Potter, Instructor 

Aims: 

The aims of the courses in History are (a) to acquaint the student with the record of 
mankind and the forces which have created that record; (b) to develop a critical faculty 
of interpreting the past; (c) to encourage an attitude of thought and concern on the 
present problems of public welfare; (d) to offer training for those who wish to teach 
history. The courses in political science are intended to provide training for profes- 
sional careers in public service and in teaching the social studies. 

The content of the courses and the spirit of instruction in the History Department 
are based on the need for an understanding of the problems which war brings to the 
United States, and to the other nations as well, both for the background and for the 
• necessities of the peace after the war. 

Requirement for Major: 

Students majoring in History should elect not less than twelve semester hours in 
European history, twelve semester hours in American history, and six hours in politi- 
cal science. Not less than eighteen hours must be taken in the upper division, and it is 
recommended that twelve hours be taken in each of the last two years. 

Requirement for Minor: 

The minimum requirement for a minor in History is eighteen hours in the department 
with not less than six hours of upper division work. Six hours of the minor may be in 
political science. 

A minimum of eighteen hours is required for a minor in political science. History 41-42 
may be made a part of the eighteen hours. All courses in political science apply on the 
history major but do not alter the minimum requirement for that major. 



Bethany College Bulletin 95 

European History 
1 1-12. History of Western Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the political and economic systems, literature, philosophy, religion, art, ar- 
chitecture, and daily life from the ancient Greeks to the nineteenth century. The course is 
intended as a foundation for the social sciences, English and foreign literatures, religion, 
and the arts. 

Mr. Shaw 
3$. Survey of European History. (3 brs.) 

The development of European Civilization from the dying Roman Empire to the seven- 
teenth century. 

Mr. Shaw 
37. Early European History. (3 hrs.) 

The history and culture of Europe from the late Middle Ages to 1648. 

Mr. Shaw 

43. Contemporary Ideologies. (3 hrs.) 

The development of Nationalism, Democracy, Communism, Fascism, and other political 
ideas in recent times. 

Mr. Shaw 

44. The Second World War. (3 hrs.) 

The background, causes, diplomacy, strategy, and campaigns of the war against Germany 
and Japan and some of the problems of the coming peace. 

Mr. Shaw 

51. Europe from 1648 to 1848. (3 hrs.) 

The development of the modern state system, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Era, 
and the Age of Metternich. Includes the development of industry, science, and modern 
thought. 

Mr. Shaw 

52. Europe since 1848. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the political and social development of Europe in the last hundred years. 
Alternates with History 51. 

Mr. Shaw 
6$. Ancient Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

Deals with the development of Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Aegean, Greece, and Italy. 

Mr. Shaw 
68. Modern Plans for World Reconstruction. (3 hrs.) 

The history of peace plans, proposals for the coming peace, and other plans and ideals for 
world reconstruction and regeneration. 

Mr. Shaw 



96 Bethany College Bulletin 

69. International Relations since 1931. (3 hrs.) 

A review of the outstanding international events and forces since the Japanese invasion 
of Manchuria and the coming into power of National Socialism in Germany. 

Mr. Shaw 

70. The History of England. (3 hrs.) 

A history of English institutions and the English people from the ninth to the early 
twentieth centuries. 

Mr. Shaw 
91. Seminar in European History, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Special topics for advanced students majoring in history. Given any semester on request. 

Mr. Shaw 

Naval History 

15-16. Historical Backgrounds of the Present World 
War. (2 hrs.) 

Sources and factors in national development, the course of America in world affairs, and 
the immediate backgrounds of the present war. This course satisfies Navy V-12, H-i and 
H-2 requirements. 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Shaw, Mr. Barlow, Mr. Potter 
47. Naval History and Elementary Strategy. (3 hrs.) 

Sea power in early and modern times, American naval policy and development, and an 
introduction to strategy and tactics. This course satisfies Navy V-12 N-3 requirement. 

Mr. Woolery 

American History 
41-42. American History. (3 hrs.) 

Political and social history of the American people from colonial settlements to the present 
time. 

Mr. Woolery 

61. The Revolutionary Era. (3 hrs.) 

Constitutional history of the American nation from 1775 to 1825. Attention to personalities 
as well as to political constructions, in the formative period of the United States. 

Mr. Woolery 

62. The Middle Period. (3 hrs.) 

Social and economic history of the United States from 1830 to about 1850. A study of the 
developing sections. 

Mr. Woolery 



Bethany College Bulletin 97 

63. Hispanic America and the United States. (3 hrs.) 

The peoples of Central and South America, their culture and political growth and relations 
with the United States. Emphasis on geographic factors and on resources as well as on 
nationalism. 

Mr. Woolery 

64. The Diplomatic History of the United States. (3 hrs.) 

The international relations of the United States, with emphasis on the present period. 

Mr. Woolery 
85. Materials and Methods of Teaching History. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

92. Seminar in American History. (2 hrs.) 

A unifying course for advanced students majoring in History. The principal topic for 1944- 
1945 will be the survey of problems and proposals for international organization for peace 
following the war, viewed from the American standpoint. Readings will prepare for the 
comprehensive examination. 

Mr. Woolery 
Political Science 

57. Political Parties. (3 hrs.) 

The nature and effect of political ideas, the workings of parties, and the questions of politi- 
cal organizations and functions. 

Mr. Woolery 

58. Public Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Concepts and methods in the application of rules of public policy to problems of national, 
state, and municipal administration. 

Mr. Woolery 

59. National Government of the United States. (3 hrs.) 

Structure, functions, and problems of the national government. 

Mr. Woolery 
72. World Politics since 191 8. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of the constitutional law of the United States as established in decisions of the 
federal courts. 

Mr. Woolery 
80. History of Political Theory. (3 hrs.) 

History and analysis of the principal political theories from Plato to the end of the nine- 
teenth century. 

Mr. Woolery 



98 Bethany College Bulletin 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

E. Hugh Behymer, Assistant Professor 
Aims: 

The course in Librarianship is especially planned for students (a) who may be inter- 
ested in Librarianship as a profession; (b) who are interested in rinding out how to use 
the library; and (c) who plan to do high school teaching and who need some practical 
instruction in library method. 

21. Introduction to Librarianship. (3 hrs.) 

A general introductory course planned to give an overview of the field of librarianship, 
to study library development, and to suggest the opportunities for service which the li- 
brary profession offers. This course is also planned to meet the needs of students who are 
interested in learning how to use the library effectively and efficiently. 

Mr. Behymer 

22. Library Techniques. (3 hrs.) 

A laboratory course planned to familiarize the prospective library school student with the 
kind of work and the type of problems undertaken in the professional library schools. 
Instruction is given in the organization and administration of school libraries. Prerequisite, 
Library Science 21. 

Mr. Behymer 

SECRETARIAL TRAINING 

Pauline Eley, Instructor 

Aims: 

The courses in the department are planned especially for students (a) who want to 
prepare for office work and general business training; (b) who want to prepare for 
teaching commercial subjects in secondary schools by meeting certificate require- 
ments in this field; (c) who want training in typewriting and shorthand as a part of a 
larger educational program. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours are required for a minor in this department. These must be arranged 
in sequence and buttressed by courses in economics and business administration. 

ii. Elementary Typewriting. (3 hrs.) 

A beginning course for those who wish to acquire a working knowledge of typewriting for 
personal and incidental vocational uses. 40 net words a minute a minimum requirement. 

Miss Eley 
12. Advanced Typewriting. (3 hrs.) 

The purpose of this course is to develop marketable proficiency in the use of the type- 
writer. 50 net words a minute a minimum requirement. 

Miss Eley 



Bethany College Bulletin 99 

15-16. Beginning Shorthand. (3 hrs.) 

Careful study of Gregg Functional shorthand principles and their application in timed 
dictation and transcription. Prerequisite or corequisite, Secretarial Training u. A con- 
tinuous course. 

Miss Eley 
29-30. Advanced Gregg Shorthand. (3 hrs.) 

The development of (a) an intensive shorthand vocabulary, (b) a shorthand writing speed 
of at least 1 10-120 words a minute, and (c) a transcribing rate of at least 30-35 words a 
minute. 

Miss Eley 

45. Principles of Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 45 

46. Principles of Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 46. 

47. Business Mathematics. (3 hrs.) 

Mathematical problems which occur most frequently in ordinary business transactions. 

Miss Eley 

50. Secretarial Practice and Office Management. (3 hrs.) 

This course is based on an activity program of simulated and actual experiences and repre- 
sentative types of office situations. Special attention is given to skill in dictation and tran- 
scription, to the various systems of filing, and to the operation of commonly used machines 
and appliances. 

Miss Eley 

51. Business Letters and Reports. (3 hrs.) 

Principles and practices of business letter writing with special emphasis on the sales letter. 
Prerequisite, or parallel, Secretarial Training n. 

Miss Eley 

61. Business Administration. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 61. 

62. Advanced Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 63. 

64. Cost Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 64. 

6$. Business Law. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 6$. 



ioo Bethany College Bulletin 

66. Consumer Problems. (3 hrs.) 

Practical applications of consumer information as required in everyday life. Specific prin- 
ciples of buying, budgeting, investments, price control, economic fluctuation and change, 
marketing functions, taxes, and credit. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Miss Eley 
85. Teaching of Business Subjects. (2 or 3 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

88. Supervised Secretarial Practice. (3 hrs.) 

Practical experience in some approved office situation under guidance and supervision of 
instructor and business representative. Course open to seniors who have demonstrated 
ability and with the permission of instructor. 

Miss Eley 
91. Problems in Secretarial Training, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A senior seminar devoted to problems of vocational supply and demand; and techniques 
involved in obtaining initial employment. 

Miss Eley 

SOCIOLOGY 

E. C. Paustian, Acting Head of the Department 
Aims: 

The curriculum in sociology is designed (a) to give an understanding of human rela- 
tionships, social institutions, social processes, and social problems; (b) to familiarize 
students with the nature and causes of the social problems which they are most likely 
to find confronting them in their communities and occupations; (c) to equip the stu- 
dent with fundamental preparation for entering various kinds of social work; and (d) 
to provide preparation for teaching sociology and for post-graduate or professional 
study. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four semester hours in the department, including Social Science 21-22, 
Sociology 31-32, 43, 47, 91-92, Biology 11-12. Sociology 6$ and 73 are recommenced 
for those expecting to major in the field of social work. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours in an approved sequence of which twelve hours must be in upper di- 
vision courses. 

31. General Sociology. (3 hrs.) 

The basic concepts and principles of sociology applied to modern society; social relations of 
the community; race and culture; social maladjustments; social change. 

Mr. Paustian 



Bethany College Bulletin ioi 

32. Family Relationships. (3 hrs.) 

The development of marriage and the family social functions; contemporary problems and 
tendencies of the family. Prerequisite, Social Science 21-22 or Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 
43. Heredity and Eugenics. (2 hrs.) 

See Biology 43. 

47. Social Measurements. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 47. 

52. Population Problems. (3 hrs.) 

History of population theories and policies; qualitative aspects of the population problem 
with reference to eugenics, migration, control of population. Prerequisite, Social Science 
2 1-22 or Sociology 3 1 . 

Mr. Paustian 
$$. Social Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 55. 

56. Criminology. (3 hrs.) 

Analysis of the social process by which individuals become criminals and delinquents; 
causative factors, techniques of control, and the social treatment of crime. Prerequisite, 
Social Science 21-22 or Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 
64. Social Service Practicum. (1-4 hrs.) 

Student training and experience during the summer months on the staff of an approved 
social service agency, such as Hiram House in Cleveland. The training includes lectures, 
conferences, supervision of organized activities, field trips, notebooks, and examination. 
Only by prior arrangement with the head of the department can students be given an op- 
portunity to earn credit in this way. Intended primarily for sociology majors. 

Mr. Paustian 
6$. Community Organization. (2 hrs.) 

Social structure and functions of the modern community. Social, economic, and political 
organization of urban and rural populations. Understanding of forces that promote or 
retard community development. Prerequisite, Sociology 31-32. 

Mr. Paustian 
67. Cultural Anthropology. (2 hrs.) 

A study of primitive people and their institutions in pre-historic and modern times for the 
purpose of recognizing universal human traits and the backgrounds of modern civilization. 
Prerequisite, Social Science 21-22 or Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 



102 Bethany College Bulletin 

70. Social Disorganization. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the major social lags leading to social breakdowns, unemployment, poverty, 
dependency, delinquency, disease, and crime. Prerequisite, Social Science 21-22 or Sociology 
31 and upper division standing. 

Mr. Paustian 

72. Introduction to Social Case Work. (3 hrs.) 

The basic principles and methods of social case work and their application in the treatment 
of individuals and families. Prerequisites, Sociology 31-32, and upper division standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Paustian 

73. Social Thought. (3 hrs.) 

A summing up of the various systems, classic and modern, of explaining the social behavior 
of individuals and groups. The nature of social control, chief control devices, institutional 
pressures and disruptive factors. Prerequisite, twelve hours of sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 

80. Group Organization and Leadership. (2 hrs.) 

The organization and leadership of homogeneous groups; significance of social processes 
characterizing such groups on the achievement of socialization and in the treatment of 
pathological behavior. Prerequisite, twelve semester hours in sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 

81. Social Ethics. (2 hrs.) 

A study of applied ethics to the problems of adolescence, sex, courtship and marriage; of 
production and consumption, distribution and conservation of wealth; of capitalism; of 
world citizenship; and of democracy and Christianity. Prerequisite, twelve semester hours 
in sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 
83. Industrial Sociology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the social forces back of modern industrialism. Social effects of modern indus- 
trialism on health, unemployment, poverty, leisure, the family, and creative intelligence. 
Prerequisite, twelve semester hours in sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 
91-92. Problems in Sociology, (i hr.) 

An advanced course for major and miner students in the department. The course has three 
purposes: (i) to interpret by summary and interpretation the preceding work in the depart- 
ment; (2) to offer instruction in the techniques and methods of social research; (3) to give 
each student an opportunity to develop his particular interest through a specific study proj- 
ect. Prerequisites, Sociology 47 and upper division standing in the department. 

Mr. Paustian 



GROUP IV— SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 



BIOLOGY 
B. R. Weimer, Head of the Department 
W. J. Sumpstine, Assistant Professor 
wllma m. sumpstine, associate 

Aims: 

The courses are intended (a) to acquaint the student with the living world around him 
and the fundamental dynamic life processes; (b) to demonstrate scientific methods of 
approach to problem solution; (c) to cultivate an attitude of inquiry and research; 
(d) to develop laboratory skill in various types of work in zoology, botany, and related 
fields; and (e) to train students as teachers of biology and for certain professional work 
related to this field. 

Students who plan to teach or become professional biologists should elect the following 
sequence of courses: Biology 11-12, 36, 43, 48, 53, 57, 6$, 67, 78, 81, and 91 or 92. 

Students preparing for work in medicine, dentistry, nursing or as laboratory tech- 
nicians should elect the following sequence of courses: Biology 11-12, 36, 43, 53, 76, 
78, 81, and 91 or 92. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four semester hours in the department following a sequence of courses 
approved by the head of the department. A minimum of twelve semester hours of 
chemistry, at least six of which are in organic chemistry, is desirable. 

A minor should be elected in a laboratory science. Either German or French should 
be elected to meet the graduation requirement for foreign languages. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen semester hours in the department exclusive of Biology 34 and 
Biology 85. 

11-12. General Biology. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

Systematic study of the fundamental structures and life processes of plants and animals, 
including man, and their important inter-relationships together with special lectures and 
discussions of the most important principles of biology — environment, heredity, variation, 
and the theory of evolution. Required of all premedical students. This course satisfies 
Navy V-12, B1-B2 requirement for pre-medical and pre-dental students. Navy V-12 
students register for four semester hours credit and must complete two one-hour periods of 
recitation and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Sumpstine, and assistants 



104 Bethany College Bulletin 

34. Our Outdoors, (i hr.) 

A general survey course in the field of man's natural environment from the standpoint of 
geology and biology. A series of field studies on plant life, animal life with particular refer- 
ence to entomology and ornithology, physical geography, rocks and minerals, and the 
essentials of camping. Estimated cost of the course to the student exclusive of tuition, 
including trips, food, and minor incidentals: $5.00 to $8.00. Not open to freshmen. Enroll- 
ment limited to fifteen. 

Mr. Weimer and others 
36. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. (5 hrs.) 

Study of the comparative anatomy of the representative forms of vertebrates. Laboratory 
study of the comparative anatomy of the shark, turtle, and cat. Prerequisite, Biology 1 1-12. 
Required of all premedical students. Three lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. This course satisfies Navy V-12, B3 requirements for pre-medical and pre-dental 
students. 

Mr. Weimer, Mrs. Sumpstine, and assistants 
43. Heredity and Eugenics. (2 hrs.) 

A general course covering modern theories and laws of heredity and their relation to man. 

Mr. Weimer 
48. Plant Ecology and Local Flora. (2 hrs.) 

The identification of the common seed plants and ferns by the use of manuals and the 
study of the relation between plants and their environment. In the spring the work will 
consist mostly of field trips with occasional laboratory exercises. Prerequisite, Biology n 
or high school biology. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
$3. Bacteriology. (3 hrs.) 

Morphology and physiology of yeasts and bacteria, principles of laboratory technique, 
cultural characteristics, and environmental influences on bacterial growth. Special emphasis 
on the relation of bacteria to domestic and public health problems. 

Mr. Sumpstine and assistants 

54. Industrial Bacteriology and Clinical Methods. (3 
hrs.) 

A practical laboratory course with occasional lectures, dealing with the bacteriology of 
water and milk, and the general food bacteriology. Some study of the elementary techniques 
in clinical methods such as blood work and urine analysis. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
57. Advanced General Botany. (3 hrs.) 

An advanced study of the structural relationships of various type forms of the plant king- 



Bethany College Bulletin 105 

dom together with a study of the fundamental life processes of plants; growth, irritability, 
food synthesis, and metabolism. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
6$. Invertebrate Zoology. (3 hrs.) 

Survey of the invertebrate animals including phylogency and morphology. A laboratory 
study of representative forms of invertebrates will be made. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
67. Physiology. (3 hrs.) 

Structure and functions of the human body and the mechanism of bodily movements, re- 
sponses, reactions, and various physiological states. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biol- 
ogy 36. Required of all majors in Physical Education. 

Mr. Weimer and assistants 
76. Histology. (3 hrs.) 

Structure of the cell and its modifications into various tissues. Special attention will be 
paid to the theory and practice of general histological technique. Prerequisite, Biology n- 
12 and Biology 36. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
78. Vertebrate Embryology. (5 hrs.) 

Nature and development of the tissues and organs in vertebrates. Embryos of chick and 
pig are studied in the laboratory. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biology 36. This course 
satisfies Navy V-12, B4 requirements for premedical and predental students. 

Mr. Weimer, Mrs. Sumpstine, and assistants 

81. Contemporary Biological Investigations and Litera- 
ture. (1 hr.) 

A survey of the fields of biological investigations and the current literature relating to in- 
vestigations in those fields. Open only to juniors and seniors. Required of all Biology ma- 
jors. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biology 36. 

Mr. Weimer 

85. Methods and Materials in Teaching Biology. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

86. Marine Biology. (4-6 hrs.) 

Credit is given for summer courses taken at the Marine Biological Station at Woods Hole, 
Massachusetts, or at any other station of similar rank. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A course in theoretical and advanced morphological biology. The problem may be selected 



106 Bethany College Bulletin 

by the student, subject to the approval of the instructor, according to interest and future 
needs and may be in either: 

a. Advanced comparative anatomy of vertebrate or invertebrate types not previously 
studied; or 

b. Review of the literature relating to various fields of investigation in biology; or 

c. Study of some problem in biological research. 

No registration for the course will be permitted without previous conference with the in- 
structor. Open only to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12, 36 and 65, or 36, 
78, and superior achievement in these courses. 

Mr. Weimer 

CHEMISTRY 

George W. Bennett, Acting Head of the Department 

Hilda Sarver, Instructor 
Aims: 

It is the aim of the department (a) to contribute to the student's general culture, 
his understanding of the nature of the physical world and his understanding of the 
place of chemistry in industrial and business life; (b) to provide training in the 
scientific method and logical analysis; and (c) to provide major students with a 
thorough and practical training in chemistry which may be useful in industrial, tech- 
nical, or educational work. 

Requirement for Majors: 

The department offers two majors. Major A is designed for the research chemist, the 
chemical engineer, the student interested in any phase of chemistry as a vocation. 
Major B is designed to meet the needs of the education, pre-medical, pre-dental, or 
other pre-professional students. In addition to chemistry, work in biology, economics, 
mathematics, physics, English, and modern languages is recommended to meet the 
student's individual needs. 

Requirement for Major A: 

Chemistry 11-12; 25-26; 61-62; 71-72; 75-76; 87, 88; and at least one year course 
or its equivalent of advanced chemistry. Mathematics through the calculus, two year 
courses in physics, German, and 16 credits in the humanities should be taken con- 
currently. 

Requirement for Major B: 

Chemistry 11-12; 25 or 26; 61-62; 71, 75; 87. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours with either sequence I or II. 
I. Chemistry, 11-12; 25-26; 61-62. 
II. Chemistry, 11-12; 61-62; 71, 75. 

11-12. General Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

This is a fundamental course in general chemistry. An introduction to qualitative analysis 



Bethany College Bulletin 107 

comprises a part of the work of the second semester. A continuous course. This course 
satisfies Navy V-12, Ci and C2 requirements for pre-medical and pre-dental students. 

Miss Sarver 
11A-12A. General Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

Three lecture-recitation periods and one laboratory period per week. Chemistry nA covers 
fundamental principles of general inorganic chemistry and applications; nonmetalic ele- 
ments and their principal compounds. This course satisfies Navy V-12, Cia requirements. 

Chemistry 12A is a condensed course on the chemistry of metals and qualitative analysis 
for one-half term. The second half of the term includes class and laboratory studies of engi- 
neering materials. This course satisfies Navy V-12, C2a and C6 requirements. 

Miss Sarver 
25-26. Quantitative Analysis. (4 hrs.) 

Theory and laboratory practice of gravimetric and volumetric analysis together with spe- 
cial methods. To meet the V-12 program requirements each semester's work will include 
both gravimetric and volumetric methods. Temporarily the student may begin the course 
either with 25 or with 26. Prerequisite, Chemistry 11-12. This course satisfies Navy V-12, 
C3 requirements for pre-medical students. 

Mr. Bennett 
61-62. Organic Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

Theory and laboratory practice in the study of the chemistry of the carbon compounds, 
for students in either major or for students in biological sciences. A continuous course. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 11-12. This course satisfies Navy V-12, C4 and C5 requirements 
for pre-medical students. 

Miss Sarver 
71-72. Theory of Physical Chemistry. (3 hrs.) 

This is a fundamental course in physical chemistry. Prerequisite or corequisite for the 
A Major; mathematics through the calculus, Physics 31-32; Chemistry 11-12; 25-26; 61- 
62. Physics majors may elect this course with the consent of the instructor. A continuous 
course. 

Mr. Bennett 
75-76. Physico-Chemical Measurements, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Laboratory studies to accompany Chemistry 71-72 which must be carried concurrently 
with this course. 

Mr. Bennett 
81-82. Industrial Chemistry. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the unit operations of chemical engineering and the accompanying industrial 
stoichiometry. 

Mr. Bennett 
85. Teaching of Chemistry. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 



io8 Bethany College Bulletin 

87. Chemical Literature, (i hr.) 

Library problems on the extent and use of the literature of chemistry. Chemistry 61-62 
prerequisite or concurrent. 

Mr. Bennett 

88. History of Chemistry, (i hr.) 

A study of the origin and development of chemical theories, and of the lives of the famous 
chemists and their contemporaries. Chemistry 61-62 prerequisite or concurrent. 

Mr. Bennett 
91-92. Problems, (i or i hrs.) 

Introduction to research investigation. Open only to those of unusual ability and adequate 
background by permission of the head of the department. Because of the lack of demand, 
due to the exigencies of the war, the following courses in chemistry will not be offered dur- 
ing 1944-45- 

Mr. Bennett 

46. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory, (i hr.) 

47. Advanced Qualitative Analysis, (i hr.) 

48. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (3 hrs.) 

51-52. Advanced Analytical Chemistry, (i or 2 hrs.) 
63-64. Qualitative Organic Chemistry. (2 hrs.) 
6$-66. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (3 hrs.) 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

34. Economic Geography. (3 hrs.) 

Study of world production and distribution of food supplies, power, resources, and raw 
materials for manufacture, with reference to the natural and economic determining factors. 
Special consideration is given to these relationships in the United States and the Ohio River 
Valley. Open to freshmen. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
2^. Principles of Geography. (3 hrs.) 

A discussion of the general principles of the science including such topics as earth origins 
and the results of the dynamic geographical agencies tending to change its surface. A study 
is made of the relation between environment and life with special reference to North Amer- 
ica. Practical work in mineralogy, physiography, and stratigraphy is required during the 
course. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
^6. Historical Geology. (3 hrs.) 

The history of the earth as revealed by its strata. Laboratory and field study of the common 
fossils and local formations. 

Mr. Sumpstine 



Bethany College Bulletin 109 

MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 

J. S. V. Allen, Head of the Department 

Allen Simmons, Associate Professor 

John S. Cluss, Instructor 

Bradford Tye, Instructor 

George W. Callendine, Jr., Instructor 

Wanda Zbiec, Instructor 

J. Calvin Fleming, Instructor 

Paul E. Brown, Instructor 

Howard B. Trombley, Instructor 

Fred A. Miller, Instructor 

Frank M. Ellis, Instructor 

Paul Waddell, Assistant in Physics 



Aims: 



The courses in mathematics are designed (a) to give the prospective teacher a thorough 
understanding and a wide appreciation of the fundamental ideas of elementary mathe- 
matics; (b) to provide the general student with a knowledge of the mathematical 
foundation of our civilization; (c) to provide a tool for the technical student; (d) to 
give the prospective graduate student a firm foundation for later study and research. 

The courses in physics are planned (a) to present a survey of the field of physics to 
the general student; (b) to teach the fundamentals of the science of physics to students 
who are training themselves for such professions as medicine, optometry, engineer- 
ing, and the teaching of physics; (c) to familiarize students expecting to enter grad- 
uate school with some of the more advanced materials in physics. The scientific 
method is stressed both in its past applications in solving important problems in phys- 
ics and for its future use by the student in solving new problems. 

Requirement for Major in Mathematics: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in mathematics including Mathematics 31-32, and 
at least twelve upper division hours. The upper division courses should include Mathe- 
matics 53-54. Students interested in science and engineering should elect Mathematics 
71. Students interested in mathematics as a teaching subject should elect Mathe- 
matics 5SS6. Two courses in the department should be taken in the senior year. 

Requirement for Major in Physics: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in physics is required. Students interested in science 
and engineering should elect Physics 73. Physics 91-92 and a reading knowledge of 
German and French are recommended for students expecting to do graduate work. 
A minor in mathematics or chemistry is strongly recommended. 

Requirement for Minor in Mathematics: 

A minimum of eighteen hours in mathematics including Mathematics 31-32 and six 
hours in upper division courses. 



no Bethany College Bulletin 

Requirement for Minor in Physics: 

A minimum of eighteen hours in physics. Mathematics 11-12 and Mathematics 31-32 
should be elected. 

Mathematics 

1 1 . Mathematical Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

Plane trigonometry, logarithms and the slide rule, linear equations, and determinants, and 
the analytical geometry of the straight line. Prerequisite, satisfactory standing in mathe- 
matics placement test for freshmen. 

Students ranking low in mathematics placement test for freshmen will be required to make 
up their deficiency in mathematics by attending a special laboratory section. 

Mr. Miller 

12. Mathematical Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

Quadratic equations, the factor theorem, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, 
permutations and combinations, the analytical geometry of second degree curves, applica- 
tions of analytic methods, and an introduction to the derivative. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
11 or three units of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, and high standing in 
mathematics placement test for freshmen. 

Mr. Miller 

13. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

Algebra through quadratics, analytical geometry of the straight line, plane trigonometry, 
logarithms, and the slide rule. For students whose preparation is less than that of those 
assigned to Mathematics 15. This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-i requirement. 

Mr. Brown 

14. Mathematical Analysis. (5. hrs.) 

Spherical trigonometry, plane and solid analytical geometry, determinants, theory of equa- 
tions. Prerequisite Mathematics 13. This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-2 requirements. 

Mr. Brown, Mr. Fleming 

15. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

Algebra through quadratics, analytical geometry of the straight line, plane geometry, 
logarithms and the slide rule. This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-i requirements. 

Mr. Brown, Mr. Cluss, Mr. Tye 

16. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

Spherical trigonometry, plane and solid analytical geometry, determinants, theory of equa- 
tions. Prerequisite, Mathematics 15. This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-2 requirements. 

Mr. Brown, Mr. Cluss 

17. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

Algebra including progressions and determinants, analytical geometry of the straight line, 



Bethany College Bulletin hi 

logarithms, slide rule, plane and spherical trigonometry. This course satisfies Navy V-12, 
M-3 requirements. 

Mr. Cluss 
18. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

Plane and solid analytical geometry, empirical equations, algebra including probability and 
theory of equations. Prerequisite, Mathematics 17. This satisfies Navy V-12, M-4 require- 
ments. 

Mr. Cluss 
21, Engineering Drawing. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of engineering drawing, straight and curved line construction, projection, per- 
spective, and isometric drawing. Not offered 1944-45. 

Mr. Ellis 



22. Engineering Drawing. (2 hrs.) 

A continuation of Mathematics 21. Not offered in 1944-45. 



Mr. Simmons 



24. Plane Surveying. (3 hrs.) 

Care and use of surveying instrument, field problems, and computation and mapping. One 
hour class work and four hours field work each week. 

Mr. Simmons 

25. Engineering Drawing. (2 hrs.) 

Free-hand lettering, orthographic projection including sections and auxiliary views, 
dimensioning, isometric and oblique projections, perspective. Emphasis on working draw- 
ings. Standard symbols and conventions. Ink and pencil tracings. Two three-hour periods 
per week. This course satisfies Navy V-12, D-i requirements. 

Mr. Callendine, Mr. Ellis, Mr. Miller 

26. Descriptive Geometry. (2 hrs.) 

Representation, notation, and visualization of points, lines, and planes; traces, revolutions, 
true lengths of lines and values of angles, auxiliary views, curved surfaces, surfaces of revo- 
lution and intersection of surfaces, applications including charts and nautical astronomy. 
Prerequisite Mathematics 25. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. This course 
satisfies Navy V-12, D-2 requirements. 

Miss Zbiec, Mr. Callendine, Mr. Simmons 
31-32. Differential and Integral Calculus. (3 hrs.) 

A standard course. Technique of differentiation and integration with applications and an 
introduction to infinite series. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1 1-12 or equivalent. A continuous 
course. Not offered 1944-45. 

Mr. Tye 



ii2 Bethany College Bulletin 

23- Calculus I. (5 hrs.) 

Technique of differentiation with applications, the differential with applications, integra- 
tion, definite integral with applications, improper integrals. Prerequisite, Mathematics n- 
12, Mathematics 15-16 or Mathematics 17-18. This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-5 re- 
quirements. 

Mr. Tye 

34. Calculus II. (3 hrs.) 

Applications of the definite integral, curve tracing, indeterminate forms, series of constant 
terms, power series with Taylor's and Maclaurin's theorems with applications, partial 
differentiation and multiple integrals with applications. This course satisfies Navy V-12, 
M-6 requirements. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or Mathematics ^3- 

Mr. Simmons 

37. Mathematics of Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

Frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and correlation, regres- 
sion equations, and the theory of probability. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12. 

Mr. Simmons 

38. Mathematics of Finance and Investment. (3 hrs.) 

The operation of interest in annuities, amortization of debts and sinking funds, valuation 
of bonds, the experience table, and calculation of premiums for life insurance. Recom- 
mended for students majoring in economics. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12. 

Mr. Simmons 

41 . Elementary Navigation and Nautical Astronomy I. (3 
hrs.) 

Review of spherical trigonometry and elementary vector mathematics with applications to 
navigation and nautical astronomy. Compass corrections, terrestrial factors, the sailings, 
dead reckoning and traverse sailings, piloting, weather. This course satisfies Navy V-12, 
M-8 requirements. Prerequisite, Mathematics 15-16, Mathematics 17-18, or Mathematics 
11-12. 

Mr. Cluss and Mr. Simmons 

42. Elementary Navigation and Nautical Astronomy II. 
(3 hrs.) 

Celestial factors, the astronomical triangle, altitude, time, asimuth and amplitude, interval 
to L.A.N., latitude, longitude and time sights, identification of celestial bodies, Sumner 
line, Marc St. Hilaire, lines of position, day's work, use of H.O. 71, 120, 127, 208, 211 and 
214. This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-9 requirements. Prerequisite, Mathematics 41. 

Mr. Cluss and Mr. Simmons 
53-54. Advanced Calculus. (3 hrs.) 

Theory of the derivative and the integral, partial differentiation and its applications, 



Bethany College Bulletin 113 

Green's and Stokes' theorems, power series, and Fourier series. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
31-32. 

Mr. Tye 

$$. Introduction to Higher Algebra. (3 hrs.) 

Theory of equations, solution of cubic, quartic, and numerical equations, complex num- 
bers, and an introduction to the fundamental concepts of algebra, class, group, field, num- 
ber. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32. 

Mr. Tye 

56. Introduction to Modern Geometry. (3 hrs.) 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, an introduction to synthetic projective geometry, 
the concept of limit and infinity, geometrical constructions, recent developments and theo- 
rems. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or its equivalent. 

Mr. Tye 

58. Spherical Trigonometry. (2 hrs.) 

Geometry and trigonometry of the sphere, with applications to surveying and navigation. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or consent of instructor. Not offered 1944-45. 

Mr. Simmons 

59. Advanced Analytic Geometry. (3 hrs.) 

Advanced methods and problems of analytic geometry of two and three dimensions, includ- 
ing loci, the general equation of the second degree, Euclidean transformations, poles and 
polars, quadric surfaces, determinants. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or its equivalent. 

Mr. Tye 

71. Differential Equations. (3 hrs.) 

Methods of solution of ordinary differential equations and their applications to the physical 
sciences. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or its equivalent. 

Mr. Tye 

81-82. Mathematics Seminary, (i hr.) 

Special reports prepared and presented by the student under supervision. The work of the 
second semester will help prepare the student for the comprehensive examination. Required 
of all major students in the senior year. 

Mr. Simmons and Mr. Tye 
86. Teaching of Mathematics. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 86. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Advanced work and independent study. Open to seniors of unusual ability who have com- 



H4 Bethany College Bulletin 

pleted eighteen hours in the department. A reading knowledge of French and German will 
be found desirable. 

Mr. Cramblet, Mr. Simmons, Mr. Tye 

Physics 

31. General Physics. (4 hrs.) 

An elementary treatment of mechanics, sound and heat. This course, together with physics 

32, comprises the fundamental course in physics which is a prerequisite to all advanced 
physics courses. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11 or its equivalent. This course satisfies Navy 
V-12, PHi requirements. 

All instructors 
32. General Physics. (4 hrs.) 

An elementary treatment of magnetism, electricity and light. This is a continuation of 
Physics 31. Prerequisite, Physics 31. This course satisfies Navy V-12, PH2 requirements. 

All instructors 
35. Basic Electronics. (3 hrs.) 

A course in electronic theory and practice. The laboratory work consists of experiments 
with the thyratron, ignitron, photocell, cathode ray oscillograph, and radio circuits. Pre- 
requisite, Physics 32. This course is offered as an Engineering Science and Management 
War Training course at Weirton, W.Va. 

Mr. Allen 
53. Advanced Light and Physical Optics. (3 hrs.) 

Theories of light, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, polarization, geometrical 
optics, optical instruments, vision and spectroscopy. Prerequisite, Physics 31-32 and 
Mathematics 31-32. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Allen 
55-56. Laboratory in Advanced Physics, (i hr.) 

Supplementary to Physics 53. The student should consult the instructor in charge before 
registering in the course. 

Mr. Allen 
61. Electrical Engineering. (3 hrs.) 

A beginning course in the study of D. C. and A. C. machinery. Prerequisite Physics 31-32 
and Mathematics 31-32. Spring term, 1945. This course satisfies Navy V-12, EE2 require- 
ments. 

Mr. Allen 
64. Elementary Heat Power. (3 hrs.) 

Thermodynamics, fuels, combustion; steam boilers, engines and turbines; internal-combus- 
tion engines; plant auxiliaries. Prerequisites, Physics 32; and Mathematics 12, Mathematics 
14, Mathematics 16 or Mathematics 18. This course satisfies the Navy V-12, ME2 require- 
ments. 

Mr. Allen and Mr. Simmons 



Bethany College Bulletin 115 

67-68. Spectroscopic Analysis, (i hr.) 

A laboratory course employing an E-i Hilger Spectrograph and auxiliary equipment for 
analytical work. Much of the work in this course consists of original research and publica- 
tion of the results. Admission by permission of the instructor. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Mr. Allen 
73. Analytical Mechanics I (Statics). (2 hrs.) 

Vectors, determination of stresses in structures and machines, friction, centroids, hydro- 
static forces and moments. Prerequisite, Mathematics 34 or accompanied by Mathematics 
34. This course satisfies Navy V-12, Ai requirements. 

Mr. Simmons 
85. Teaching of Physics. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Readings, experiments and investigations in radioactivity, spectroscopy and electronics, 
or in the field of the student's interest. Open to juniors and seniors of superior ability and 
accomplishment who are majoring or minoring in the department. 

Mr. Allen 



GROUP V— RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY, AND 

FINE ARTS 



RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

Dwight E. Stevenson, Head of the Department 

Irvin T. Green, Professor 

Aims: 

(a) To provide for all students in the liberal arts a focus of religious meanings for the 
integration of knowledge and for the guidance of life, more especially as that system 
of meanings is to be discovered in the Bible record of the Jewish and Christian faiths. 

(b) To prepare students planning to enter the various branches of the Christian Minis- 
try for graduate study in professional schools of religion and divinity schools. 

(c) To give enough professional guidance to enable a graduate of the college to enter 
immediately into Christian service as a minister or religious educator, until such time 
as graduate study may be possible for him. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours, of which eighteen hours shall be in the upper division. For pre- 
ministerial students this shall include Bible 31, 33-34, 53~54- 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours, of which twelve hours shall be in the upper division. A minimum of 
eighteen hours in philosophy is required for a minor in philosophy. 

Requirement for Graduation: 

Six hours of work in The English Bible are required of all students qualifying for grad- 
uation. Any of the following courses may be taken without prerequisite to satisfy this 
requirement: In the Sophomore year — Bible 31-32. In the Junior or Senior year: — 
Bible 53-54; 55-56; 65-66; 71-72. Only students studying for the Christian ministry 
are permitted to take Bible 31-32 in the freshman year; most students planning to 
major in other departments will take their basic requirement in the sophomore year. 

The Bible 

3 1 . The Growth of Bible Religion. (3 hrs.) 

The development of several great religious ideas through the progressive stages of biblical 
literature. Such topics as God, right and wrong, man, suffering, prayer and immortality 
will be discussed. Opportunity will be given for individual expression of student beliefs. 
To be taken in the sophomore year. 

Mr. Stevenson 

32. New Testament History. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the life and message of Jesus, the origin of the Christian Church, and the work 



Bethany College Bulletin 117 

of Paul. Ministerial students should elect a full year, Bible 33-34, in place of this course. 
To be taken in the sophomore year. 

Mr. Green 
33-34. New Testament Survey. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of all books of the New Testament. The first semester will be devoted to the 
Four Gospels. 

Mr. Green 
53-54. Old Testament History. (3 hrs.) 

A history of the political and religious development of the Hebrew people to the time of the 
Maccabees. 

Mr. Stevenson 
55-56. The Prophets. (3 hrs.) 

The origin and development of prophecy among the Hebrews. Special attention to social 
and political backgrounds. 

Mr. Stevenson 
6$. The Teachings of Jesus. (3 hrs.) 

The teachings of Jesus in relation to the movements of his time, and to the Jewish and 
Greek backgrounds. 

Mr. Green 
66. The Teachings of Paul. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the fundamental doctrines of the Epistles of Paul in the New Testament. 

Mr. Green 
67-68. The Background of the New Testament. (3 hrs.) 

A study and evaluation of the social, religious, economic and political life of the Jews and 
of the Graeco-Roman world. 

Mr. Green 
71-72. The Bible as Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the various types of literature in the Bible together with their composition and 
transmission. 

Mr. Stevenson 
73-74. New Testament Greek. (3 hrs.) 

The Gospel of Luke and selections from the Pauline Epistles will be read and studied. The 
grammar of the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: Two years of classical Greek. 

Mr. Green 
83-84. Biblical Doctrine. (3 hrs.) 

An investigation of the various doctrines of the New Testament; studied in relation to later 
Christian thinking. 

Mr. Green 



n8 Bethany College Bulletin 

91-92. Problems. (2 hrs.) 

An investigation of special problems of Biblical scholarship. An advanced course for ma- 
jors. Problems to be selected by the individual student upon the basis of personal interest 
and faculty advice. 

Mr. Green, Mr. Stevenson 

Church History 
51-52. History and Literature of the Disciples. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the rise and development of the Restoration Movement, including an evalua- 
tion of the literature produced. 

Mr. Green 

69. The Ancient Church. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of Church History from the beginning to the reign of Charlemagne. 

Mr. Green 

70. The Reformation. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of church history from Charlemagne to the close of the Reformation. 

Mr. Green 

Religious Education and Homiletics 
3S~3^- Religious Education. (3 hrs.) 

Methods and materials of Christian education through the church and the church school. 

Mr. Stevenson 
61-62. The Theory of Preaching. (3 hrs.) 

The preparation and delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Green 
63-64. The Work of the Pastor. (3 hrs.) 

The organization of the local church, including a study of financial methods, evangelism, 
worship and social problems. 

Mr. Green 

Philosophy 
53-54. History of Philosophy. (3 hrs,) 

A rapid survey of western philosophical thought from the seventh century B.C. to modern 
times. A study of the philosophical source of modern ideas in certain matters of govern- 
ment, ethics, education, and religion. 

Mr. Stevenson 
5^. Reflective Thinking. (3 hrs.) 

An analysis of deductive and inductive reasoning; practice in the detection of logical fal- 
lacies. 

Mr. Stevenson 



Bethany College Bulletin 119 

$6. Frontiers of Thought. (3 hrs.) 

A course in philosophical problems designed to introduce the student to actual experience 
in the philosophical method. 

Mr. Stevenson 



57. Contemporary Philosophy. (3 hrs.) 

A study of western philosophical thought since 1900. 



Mr. Stevenson 



58. Philosophy of Religion. (3 hrs.) 

Investigation of the life situation out of which religion rises for the individual and for 
society; a study of religion in belief and in practice. 

Mr. Stevenson 
61-62. Plato. (3 hrs.) 

A critical study of the philosophy of Plato and its influence on ancient and modern thought 
and culture. The second semester will be devoted to a specific study of the "Republic" and 
its influence upon philosophy and literature. 

Mr. Gay 

MUSIC 
Rush Carter, Head of the Department 
Aims: 

The department aims (a) to provide opportunity for students to develop an under- 
standing and appreciation of music as a part of a general education; (b) to provide a 
well-balanced and complete four-year course for students who major in music for the 
purpose of becoming professional performers or private teachers; and (c) to provide a 
course for students who desire to become supervisors and teachers of music in elemen- 
tary and high schools. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four hours in the department, including eighteen upper division hours. 
The major may be earned in (a) theory of music, or (b) teaching of music in the schools. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen hours in the department, approved by the department head. 

Literature and Theory of Music 
11-12. Ear Training and Sight Singing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of tonal relationships, simple rhythms, melodies in both major and minor modes, 
simple melodic forms and harmonic progressions, 

Mr. Carter 



120 Bethany College Bulletin 

31-32. Music Appreciation. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the aesthetic significance of the main types and periods of music leading to an 
intelligent appreciation and enjoyment of the world's great music. A general course requir- 
ing no technical background. 

Mr. Carter 
3$. Harmony I. (3 hrs.) 

A study of major and minor scales, all intervals and relation to scales, the use of tonic and 
dominant seventh chords in all positions of four-part harmony, with all by-tones. 

Mr. Carter 
36. Harmony II. (3 hrs.) 

A study of all primary and secondary harmonies used in four-part writing and with simple 
accompaniment; the beginning of modulation. 

Mr. Carter 
51-52. Music History. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the historical significance of the main periods and types of music. A technical 
course primarily for those looking toward a major or minor in music, or for those with suffi- 
cient musical background. 

Mr. Carter 
^. Harmony III. (3 hrs.) 

A study of chromatic harmony and advanced modulation. 

Mr. Carter 
$6. Form and Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the structural designs upon which music is based, including polyphonic, classic, 
romantic, and modern periods. 

Mr. Carter 
61-62. Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training. (2 hrs.) 

An advanced study of tonal relationships, including chromatics, syncopated and difficult 
rhythms, recognition of harmonic progressions, including simple modulations. Not offered 
in 1944-45- 

Mr. Carter 
6^. Counterpoint. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles of contrapuntal harmonization in two, three, and four parts, and 
the practical application of counterpoint in the form of invention. Not offered in 1944- 
1945. 

Mr. Carter 
66. Orchestration. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the beginning principles of instrumentation and orchestration, including a 
thorough understanding of transposing instruments, and the problems of writing for such 



Bethany College Bulletin 121 

groups of instruments as are most commonly found in the average school or community- 
orchestra. 

Mr. Carter 
75-76. Conducting. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the technique of the baton, and the different problems to be met in conducting 
chorus, orchestra, and band; the introduction to score reading; and an opportunity for prac- 
tical experience through the conducting of the college choral and instrumental group. 
Offered only to advanced students of music. 

Mr. Carter 

85. The Teaching of Music in the Schools. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching music in the grades. 

Mr. Carter 

86. The Teaching of Music in the Schools. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching music in junior and senior 
high schools. 

Mr. Carter 
91-92. Problems, (i hr.) 

An advanced course for major students of music, which may include methods of piano 
teaching, composition, or other problems to prepare the individual for his particular inter- 
ests in music. Offered junior or senior year. 

Mr. Carter 

Applied Music 
I5c-i6c. Choir, (i hr.) 

A study of choral literature and rendition of cantatas, oratorios, and selected numbers of 
recognized merit. 

Mr. Carter 
150-160. Orchestra, (i hr.) 

Orchestral instruments in their various combinations. Study and rendition of concert 
repertoire. 

Mr. Carter 
I5b-i6b. Band, (i hr.) 

Study and performance of standard band repertoire. 

Mr. Weimer 
2ip-22p. Piano, (i hr.) 

Technique, theory, and literature of the piano. Open to students who have some performing 
ability on the piano. Private lessons. 

Mr. Carter 



122 Bethany College Bulletin 

210-220. Organ, (i hr.) 

Technique, theory, and literature of the organ. Open to students who have had some train- 
ing in either piano or organ. Private lessons. 

Mr. Carter 
2iv-22v. Voice, (i hr.) 

Vocal technique, theory, and literature. Open to all students with adequate native ability, 
with or without previous vocal training. Private lessons. 

Mr. Carter 

Note: Music 15C-16C, 150-160, I5b-i6b, open for credit only to students above the fresh- 
man year who are properly qualified and accepted by the director. These courses may be 
repeated for full credit. Prerequisite: six hours of theoretical music. 

Only twelve semester hours of academic work in Applied Music can be applied toward meet- 
ing the minimum requirements for the baccalaureate degree. 

ART APPRECIATION 

31-32. Introduction to Art. (3 hrs.) 

Development and character of the architecture, sculpture and painting of Egypt, Greece, 
Rome and Europe in relation to the civilization of which they are a permanent expression. 

Miss Mahaffey 
33-34. Painting. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the Italian masters of the sixteenth century, and of the leading painters of Spain 
and northern Europe. In the second semester emphasis will be on Modern Painting, with 
especial attention to the work of American artists. Not offered in 1944-45. 

Miss Mahaffey 



EQUIPMENT AND RESOURCES 



LOCATION 



Bethany College is situated in the northern panhandle of West 
Virginia, seven miles southeast of Wellsburg on State Route 67, 
Hheen miles north of Wheeling on State Route 88, and forty-five 
miles southwest of Pittsburgh. A map indicating automobile routes 
to Bethany is printed on the inside back cover of this bulletin. A 
bus line operates on regular schedule between the village of Beth- 
any and the city of Wellsburg. In Wellsburg connections are made 
with local bus lines for Steuben ville, Ohio; Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia; and Washington, Pennsylvania. Good railroad connections 
are possible by way of the Pennsylvania Railroad to Steubenville, 
Ohio, and Wellsburg, West Virginia, or by way of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad to Wheeling. Bethany is eight miles from the 
Wheeling Ohio County Airport now under construction. 

The village of Bethany is situated in rugged hilly country at an 
elevation of approximately 1,000 feet above sea level. It is accessi- 
ble to and, at the same time, away from industrial centers and thus 
it provides a healthy and attractive environment for students. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The College Campus — The college campus, consisting of about 
fifty acres, is located on a hilltop overlooking the beautiful Buffalo 
Creek. On these fifty acres are a variety of fine trees and numerous 
shrubs attractively placed in a well-kept lawn. The parklike cam- 
pus with its background of wooded hills provides a picturesque 
setting for the college and its community. 

The Main College Building — The Main Building stands in 
the center of the campus. It is an imposing structure of Gothic 
architecture — and contains about forty rooms, most of which are 
used as classrooms. Along the west side and running the entire 
length of the building is the Corridor, an open promenade three 
hundred feet in length. 

Commencement Hall — This building was reconstructed and 
dedicated in 1924. The original Commencement Hall was built 
in 1872, and the Gothic lines of the original building have been 
kept. The auditorium seats approximately six hundred people and 
contains an equipped stage, pipe organ, and facilities for motion 



124 Bethany College Bulletin 

pictures. Studios for music and speech, together with several prac- 
tice rooms for music and a shop room for theater arts, are located 
on the lower floor of this building. 

E. W. Oglebay Hall of Agriculture — This hall was do- 
nated to the college by the late Earl W. Oglebay, of the Class of 
1869. This building is used mainly for the teaching of the sciences. 
It contains chemical and biological lecture rooms, laboratories and 
supply rooms. 

Carnegie Library — This building was made possible by gifts 
of Andrew Carnegie in 1906. The building is constructed of brown 
pressed brick with Berea sandstone trimmings. On the first floor 
are located the reference collection, newspapers, the religious col- 
lection and the library offices. On the second floor are the main li- 
brary desk and catalogue, the book stacks, and reading room. On 
the third floor are the current periodicals and the bound volumes of 
periodicals, the Alexander Campbell Memorial Room, and an ex- 
hibit room. 

The Irvin Gymnasium — This gymnasium was donated in 19 10 
by the Irvin family of Big Run, Pennsylvania. It is equipped with 
swimming pool 20 by 60 feet, shower baths, team rooms, trophy 
room, and running track, in addition to the gymnasium floor. 

Rine Recreation Field — As a memorial to the late Edwin M. 
Rine, friend and benefactor of the college, the Board of Trustees 
designated certain areas of land directly west of the campus to be 
known as the Rine Fields. These fields are now in the process of 
development. Facilities are now available for football, baseball, 
track, cross country, soccer, rifle range, obstacle course. 

Nature Trail — Margaretta Parkinson bequeathed the Parkin- 
son Farm to the College in 19 14. Under the terms of this bequest 
two tracts of virgin timber on this property, known as the Parkin- 
son Oaks and the Parkinson Woods, are to be preserved intact as a 
memorial to Thomas Parkinson and Margaret Parkinson, her 
grandparents and former owners of the farm. 

Through this tract of magnificent oaks, elms, birches, and 
beeches there were constructed several miles of nature trails to- 
gether with picnic spots for the use of students and friends of the 
college. The trail follows the banks of a ravine. New species of 
trees, shrubs and wild flowers are being planted along the trail and 
in the woods which have been set aside as a bird and game 
sanctuary. These facilities are useful in the nature recreation pro- 
gram of the college. 



Bethany College Bulletin 125 

Percy B. Cochran Hall — Hon. M. M. Cochran, of the Class 
of 1875 donated this dormitory for men in 19 10 as a memorial to 
his son, Percy B. Cochran, of the Class of 1900. The building is 
four stories high and is built of white brick. A men's lounge to- 
gether with browsing library and kitchenette occupies the first 
floor. The rooms are furnished with desks, study chairs, chiffon- 
niers, and beds. 

Phillips Hall — This dormitory for women was originally do- 
nated to the college by Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, Sr., of New Cas- 
tle, Pennsylvania. In 1930 a splendid new dromitory was com- 
pleted to replace and include the original building. There are 
student rooms for over a hundred women. In addition to the 
dormitory space the building provides a central dining room for 
all college women and facilities for other important services of the 
college. 

Each student room is equipped with a study desk, the necessary 
chairs and beds, and built-in cabinets which provide each resident 
with a chest of drawers and a wardrobe with extension hangers. 

The social needs of the young women and the entire college are 
served by the large lobby, small loggias, and the spacious drawing 
room on the main floor. At the present time Phillips Hall is used by 
the Navy V-12 Unit. 

The Bethany House — This new dining hall for men is planned 
to provide dining facilities for men of the college and an informal 
social center for the entire student body. The building is the first 
unit of a proposed student union building. At the present time the 
Bethany House is being used as a dining hall for the civilian stu- 
dents of the college. 

Helwig House — This is a well-appointed dormitory for twen- 
ty-five college women, named in memory of Miss Anna L. Helwig 
of Wheeling. It is operated under conditions similar to those gov- 
erning residents in Phillips Hall with a faculty resident in charge. 

Gateway Hall — This is a well-appointed dormitory for forty- 
five college women. It is operated under conditions similar to 
those governing residents in Phillips Hall with a faculty resident 
in charge. 

Residence Homes for Women — The college operates other 
residence buildings for college women. Some of these are occupied 
by chapters of national sororities. 

In the present war time when the Navy V-12 unit occupies 
Phillips Hall and the enrollment of civilian men is drastically re- 



n6 Bethany College Bulletin 

duced, young women of the College have been housed in the for- 
mer fraternity houses and in Gay House, a large, modern, com- 
modious dwelling. Each house is under the supervision of a resi- 
dent who is responsible to the Academic Adviser for Women. 

Pendleton Heights — A short distance to the north of the 
Main Building on the campus is the home of the President of the 
college, known as Pendleton Heights. The building was erected in 
1 84 1 by W. K. Pendleton, a member of the first faculty of the col- 
lege and the second president of the institution. It was purchased 
by the college in 1940. The building was completely remodeled in 
J 935* ^ is attractively furnished and admirably situated for its 
intended purpose. 

Point Breeze — The manor house, Point Breeze, is operated by 
the college for the accommodation of students. The Point Breeze 
estate, which is east of and adjacent to the college campus, was 
purchased in 1937. 

The Cochran Central Heating Plant — The college came 
into the possession of this building and its equipment through the 
generosity of Hon. M. M. Cochran of the Class of 1875. The col- 
lege buildings and the Bethany Memorial Church are heated from 
this source. 

The College Farms and Farm Buildings — Through the gen- 
erosity of the late E. W. Oglebay of the Class of 1869, Bethany 
College owns the Alexander Campbell farm of 205 acres. At Mr. 
Oglebay's expense, many improvements were made on this farm, 
including a large round dairy barn 86 feet in diameter and a cream- 
ery building. By deed bearing date of April 7, 19 14, Miss Mar- 
garetta E. Parkinson has given to the college the farm of 251 acres 
adjoining the college. The Point Breeze Farm was purchased in 
1937 and other holdings of the college bring the total land of 
Bethany College to over 1,000 acres. 

LIBRARIES 

Library and Reading Room Equipment — The Bethany Col- 
lege Library contains more than 40,700 volumes of carefully se- 
lected books and periodicals designed primarily to meet the needs 
of the students of an undergraduate liberal arts college, approxi- 
mately 5,000 volumes of unbound periodicals and a large collection 
of vertical file material and government documents. Approxi- 
mately 2,500 books are added annually to the collection. The books 



Bethany College Bulletin 127 

are classified by the Dewey Decimal Classification and are cata- 
logued by Library of Congress rules using Library of Congress 
printed cards when available. The Library subscribes to one hun- 
dred and eighty- three periodicals covering all subject fields offered 
by the College and nine newspapers including three foreign lan- 
guage papers. 

The Library is housed in a separate building which was a gift of 
the late Andrew Carnegie. On the first floor of the building are the 
offices of the librarian, the assistant librarian, and the library work 
rooms. The periodical collection, bound and current, the daily 
newspapers and the back files of the newspapers, the periodical 
and newspaper indexes and the Reference collection are also on 
the first floor. The study room seats forty students. The main 
collection of books, the reserve book collection, and the card cata- 
logue are on the second floor. The stacks are open to the students 
who are encouraged to make full use of the book collection. The 
study room on the main floor seats forty-four students. In addition 
recreational reading facilities are made available to all the stu- 
dents in the college. There is a collection of current popular fiction 
and non-fiction together with the latest numbers of periodicals of 
general interest to the students. The religious collection is housed 
on the third floor of the library. Special facilities have been made 
available to the students of Biblical Literature. Historical ma- 
terial dealing with the Church and the College are housed in a 
room on the third floor designed as the Alexander Campbell Me- 
morial Room. Two rooms on the third floor have been made avail- 
able to the Mathematics Department for the duration of the war. 

General Regulations — The Library is open fifty-eight hours 
a week covering a seven-day schedule. The building is closed dur- 
ing Convocation and on all scheduled college holidays. Books from 
the stacks may be charged out for two-week periods and may be 
renewed. Reserve books may be charged out for two-hour periods 
during the day and for overnight use. Books in the reference col- 
lection and periodicals, bound and unbound, are not available for 
general circulation but are to be used in the building. 

Special Collections — Several valuable collections have been 
received by the College and have been made a part of the College 
Library. The principal parts of the libraries of Alexander Camp- 
bell, Robert Richardson, Miss A. C. Pendleton, Archibald Mc- 
Lean, W. S. Priest, Levi Marshall, Miss Mary I. Nichols, R. H. 



128 Bethany College Bulletin 

Wynne, Cloyd Goodnight, M. M. Cochrane, Anna Ruth Bourne 
are among these. A valuable library of early literature of the 
Disciples of Christ has come from Samuel Lindsay, Buffalo, New 
York; from Rev. W. S. Good, Youngs town, Ohio; and from Miss 
Ellen Thomas, Augusta, Georgia; Ben S. Ferral and others. The 
College wishes to make grateful acknowledgment of many gifts 
from graduates, former students, and friends of the college of 
books, periodicals, and manuscripts of particular interest to the 
College and the Church. 

Christopher Graham Library — The Christopher Graham Li- 
brary is dedicated to the memory of a "truly fine college boy" who 
was a student leader and a resident of Cochran Hall in 1932-33. 
This Library, formerly housed in the Men's Lounge at Cochran 
Hall, has been transferred to the College Library for the duration 
of the war. 

Dagney Andersen Library — A small library for leisure time 
reading is maintained for the use of all college women at Gateway 
Hall. It is dedicated to the memory of Dagney Andersen, of the 
Class of 1935, who was one of Bethany's most representative 
women. 

Chemistry Library — The departmental library for chemistry 
is located on the third floor of Oglebay Hall. Here are located files 
of many of the leading chemical journals, including several for- 
eign publications and a complete bound set of Chemical Abstracts, 
and general reference materials for the use of the Chemistry De- 
partment. 

Chemistry Study Library — The departmental library for 
chemistry is located on the third floor of Oglebay Hall. Here are 
complete files of many of the leading chemical journals and other 
general reference materials for the use of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment. 

INSTRUCTIONAL EQUIPMENT 

Biology Laboratories — The biology laboratories and confer- 
ence rooms are located on the first floor of Oglebay Hall. These 
laboratories are adequately equipped to take care of courses in 
general biology, plant morphology, and physiology, bacteriology, 
comparative anatomy, embryology, and histology. Special re- 
search facilities are available for students in the upper division. 
Work shops for ornithology and taxidermy, modeling and other 



Bethany College Bulletin 129 

departmental activities are situated in the basement of Oglebay 
Hall. 

Chemical Laboratories — These laboratories occupy the sec- 
ond and third floors of Oglebay Hall. They consist of a general 
laboratory, an analytical laboratory, and a well equipped labora- 
tory for organic and physical chemistry. There are also two smaller 
chemical storerooms, research laboratories, a spectroscopic labo- 
ratory, balance rooms, and a small machine shop. General appara- 
tus is adequate for individual instruction in all courses offered. 

Physics Laboratory — The rooms used by the Department of 
Physics are on the first floor of the Main Building. Modern equip- 
ment sufficient for elementary and advanced physics courses is in 
the possession of the college. Special apparatus is available for 
work in the fields of magnetism, photo-elasticity, radio transmis- 
sion and reception, cosmic rays and astronomy. An E-i spectro- 
graph, loaned to the college by the Follansbee Brothers Steel 
Company, is available for research work in steel analysis and 
other fields of spectroscopy. 

Observatory — A small observatory building situated on the 
southwest corner of the campus houses a modern ten inch reflect- 
ing telescope electrically operated. This equipment was made pos- 
sible through gifts from the estate of J. B. Finley of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

Psychological Laboratory — The laboratory for experimental 
psychology is located on the second floor of the Main Building in 
connection with the psychology lecture room. The laboratory is 
equipped for individual work in elementary experimental psychol- 
ogy, mental measurements, and some phases of applied psychol- 
ogy. 

Music Equipment — The studios and practice rooms of the De- 
partment of Music are located on the first floor of Commencement 
Hall. They are well equipped with pianos for the use of students 
taking work in music. A two-manual Teller-Kent pipe organ in 
Commencement Hall and the pipe organ at the Bethany Memorial 
Church are available for students. The vocal work in music is 
facilitated by the use of a voice recording machine. 

Secretarial Training — Laboratory work rooms are main- 
tained for students who are taking secretarial training and com- 
mercial education. The equipment includes typewriters and 
various office appliances. 



130 Bethany College Bulletin 

ENDOWMENTS 

The book value of the endowments of the college as of June 30, 
1944, was $2,408,418.31. 

The M. M. Cochran General Endowment — On January 25, 
1921, Hon. M. M. Cochran of the Class of 1875, gave Bethany- 
certain valuable assets, the proceeds of which are known as the 
M. M. Cochran General Endowment Fund. Further securities 
were added to this endowment in 1929 to strengthen and secure 
the original donation. The value of this gift to the college is placed 
at $500,000. 

The M. M. Cochran Endowment of 1923 — On February 19, 
1923, Mr. Cochran gave $300,000 to the college to be known as the 
M. M. Cochran Endowment of 1923. This was part of the cam- 
paign to secure endowment for the college in cooperation with the 
General Education Board and resulted in increasing the endow- 
ments of the college by $600,000. 

The M. M. Cochran Endowment of Office and Chair of 
President — In collaboration with the Men and Millions Move- 
ment of the Disciples of Christ, M. M. Cochran began an endow- 
ment of the President's Chair at Bethany College. Subsequent 
donations increased the endowment for this chair to $100,000. 

The M. M. Cochran Trust Funds — On the death of M. M. 
Cochran three special funds were set up subject to certain re- 
mainder interests, the balance of the income to be used for the 
general purposes of the college. Certain life interests being satis- 
fied, these trust funds are to become a part of the M. M. Cochran 
general endowment. The value of these trusts is $805,695.36. 

The Thomas W. Phillips Bible Chair Endowment — Hon. 
Thomas W. Phillips, Sr., of New Castle, Pennsylvania, has given 
$30,000 to endow a chair known as the Thomas W. Phillips Bible 
Chair. 

The Sarah B. Cochran Chair of Philosophy Endowment — 
Mrs. Sarah B. Cochran, of Dawson, Pennsylvania, has contributed 
$25,000 toward the endowment of a chair to be known as the Sarah 
B. Cochran Chair of Philosophy. 

The Herbert Moninger Chair of Bible School Pedagogy 
Endowment — Through the interest and generosity of many Bible 
schools, churches, and individuals a fund of $25,000 has been given 
to the college for the endowment of the Moninger Memorial Chair 



Bethany College Bulletin 131 

of Bible School Pedagogy. Herbert Moninger was a graduate of the 
Class of 1898. 

The George T. Oliver Chair of History Endowment — The 
late Senator George T. Oliver of the Class of 1868 gave $50,000 to 
the permanent endowment fund to be used for the endowment of 
the George T. Oliver Chair of History. 

The R. A. Long Chair of Mathematics Endowment — In con- 
nection with the Men and Millions Movement of the Disciples of 
Christ, R. A. Long of Kansas City, Missouri, gave $50,000 to the 
endowment fund of the college. This amount was to be used to en- 
dow the Chair of Mathematics. 

The Thomas W. Phillips, Jr. 3 Endowment — Hon T. W. Phil- 
lips, Jr., of Butler, Pennsylvania, has donated $55,000 to the gen- 
eral endowment of the college to be known as the T. W. Phillips, 
Jr., Endowment Fund. 

The E. M. Rine Trust Fund — The late E. M. Rine, of Mont- 
clair, New Jersey, bequeathed to the college a large share of his 
estate. Monies from this estate are placed in the E. M. Rine Trust 
Fund as they are received and are disbursed in accordance with the 
action of the Board of Trustees. Approximately $219,000 of this 
has been used for special purposes. The present value of the prop- 
erty and securities remaining in the trust fund is approximately 
$75,000 and is temporarily designated as endowment. An addi- 
tional $90,000 will come to the college from this source at a future 
date. 

The Anna Ruth Bourne Fund — Anna Ruth Bourne, for many 
years professor and head of the Department of English bequeathed 
to the college her library and the sum of $12,000 as a gift to the 
endowment funds of the college. The income from this fund is to 
be used to purchase books and supplies for the Department of 
English. 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

The Gans Fund — The Gans Fund was established by Wick- 
liffe Campbell Gans, graduate of Bethany College of the Class of 
1870, and his brother Emmett W. Gans, in memory of their father 
and mother, Dr. Daniel L. Gans and Margaret Gordon Gans of 
East Sparta, Stark County, Ohio. This fund has a value in excess 
of $50,000, the income from which is to be used to encourage ad- 



132 Bethany College Bulletin 

vanced study and research in science by juniors, seniors, and gradu- 
ates of Bethany College. 

The J. T. Smith Fund — J. T. Smith bequeathed $17,216 to the 
college, the income of which is to be used to assist young men and 
women who are studying for the Christian ministry. 

The Minnie W. Schaefer Fund — Minnie W. Schaefer has 
given a sum of $8,000 to Bethany College, which sum has been 
designated by the trustees to be used for assistance of students at 
the college preparing for definite Christian service, and subject to 
future action of the Board of Trustees. 

The Anna L. Helwig Fund — Anna L. Helwig donated to the 
college the sum of $32,000 for the general purposes of the college. 
This sum is temporarily designated as endowment subject to fu- 
ture action by the Board of Trustees. 

The Josiah N. Wilson Fund — Josiah N. Wilson donated to the 
college the sum of $2,567.03, the income of which is to be used to 
assist such students as may be studying for service in the Christian 
Ministry and may be designated by the President of the college. 

The William Kimbrough Pendleton Endowment Fund — 
By the will of Clarinda Pendleton Lamar, the sum of $20,000 was 
bequeathed to the college to establish the William Kimbrough 
Pendleton Scholarship Fund in memory of her father, William 
Kimbrough Pendleton, who was a member of the first faculty of 
the college in 1841 and served as vice president and treasurer until 
elected as the second president of the college in 1866 in which posi- 
tion he served till 1889. The income from this fund is to be awarded 
to students from West Virginia under such conditions as the 
faculty may prescribe. 

Men and Millions Fund — Certain monies totalling $66,000 
received from the Men and Millions Movement of the Disciples of 
Christ is designated for general purposes of the college. These 
funds are temporarily designated as endowment subject to future 
action by the Board of Trustees. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 

One of the expressed aims of the college is "To provide higher 
education in an atmosphere sympathetic to Christian ideals and 
Christian faith and to conserve and develop the moral character 
and religious life of its students." This aim is meant to bear upon 
instruction, counseling, and social life as well as formal religious 
services. 

Convocation — A fifty minute convocation is held each Tues- 
day and Thursday at eleven o'clock. Most services are devotional. 
Lectures by faculty members and noted visitors, drama, music and 
student presentations are the most frequent elements of the con- 
vocation service. Attendance is obligatory for all students. The 
convocation service is non-sectarian. 

The College Church — All students regardless of denomina- 
tional affiliations are welcome as "Student Members" of the Beth- 
any Memorial Church. One of the active organizational groups of 
the church is the Council on Student work through which are co- 
ordinated the various religious activities of the student body. Op- 
portunity of personal counseling with the minister is offered. Every 
Sunday there is morning worship in charge of the minister. In the 
late afternoon there is an informal "Vesper Service" which pro- 
vides devotional expression and religious stimulus. There is also 
opportunity to participate in student interest groups at various 
times during the year. A number of positions of leadership in the 
church are available to students showing interest and ability. 

Pre-Easter Vespers — Vesper services are held in the Bethany 
Memorial Church early each afternoon during the week preceding 
Easter or Palm Sunday. Arrangements are in charge of students of 
the college and the Council on Student Work. 

Instruction — Since its inception, the Bible has been a recog- 
nized textbook in the college and each student is asked to pursue 
this study for at least one year. The approach is intended to be 
sympathetic and constructive. 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

One of the privileges of the student body of Bethany College is 
that of hearing outstanding lectures, musicians, and leaders of 



134 Bethany College Bulletin 

thought. During the current year the following people have ap- 
peared or are scheduled to appear upon the campus. 

Lectures: 

Edwin Steckel, Musical lecturer 

John McDowell, Director of Soho Community House, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Dillworth Lupton, Newspaper columnist 

"Rosey" Roswell, Sports commentator 

"Dusty" Miller, Humorist 

F. H. Kirkpatrick, Special consultant, Personnel Depart- 
ment, R. C. A. 

Edgar DeWitt Jones, President, Federal Churches of Christ 

Claudia de Lys, Lecturer 

Robert Friers, Travelogue 

Rabbi George Lieberman, Lecturer 

Sigmund Spaeth, Music critic 

Bruce Thomas, Ex-Commando, War Correspondent 

Robert C. Taft, U. S. Senator from Ohio 

Colin McKenzie, Author and lecturer 

Roy G. Howells, Lecturer 

William Twoomey, Naturalist from Carnegie Museum 

Musical: 

The Ionian Singers 
Miriam Miller, Soprano 
Gertrude Hopkins, Harpist 
Robert Elliott, Violinist 
Judith Magee, Interpreter dancer 
Rosa Page Welch, Contralto 
Hilda Ohlin, Soprano 
Frederick Johnson, Tenor 
Helen Wood, Soprano 

SPECIAL DAYS 

Scholar's Day — Each year a special convocation is held for the 
recognition of outstanding academic achievement by individual 
students and student groups. The program is under the direction 
of the Dean of the Faculty. 

Homecoming Day — One of the most important dates in mid- 



Bethany College Bulletin 135 

autumn is designated as fall homecoming day. This usually occurs 
on a Saturday. Athletic events in the afternoon, various social 
group meetings, and the fall homecoming dance constitute the 
program. 

Mother's Day — The feature of the day is the service held at 
the Bethany Memorial Church and attended by students with 
their mothers. This is followed by special dinners in the college 
dining halls and fraternity houses. An informal reception at Phil- 
lips Hall is held in the afternoon. 

Play Day for High Schools Girls — On a Saturday in the late 
spring the Department of Physical Education for Women invites 
girls from many nearby high schools to a Play Day. Girls are di- 
vided into teams after their arrival, and many events are planned 
for their enjoyment. 

Vocational Conference — A weekend program is planned for 
the young women of the college. At this time women leaders in 
various vocations are brought to the campus for conference with 
the women students on vocational problems and possibilities. This 
activity is under the direction of Miss Carrigan, assisted by the 
Association of Women Students. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student Board of Governors — As a means of governing and 
directing student interest and student activities, the Student 
Board of Governors is maintained by the student body as a legis- 
lative and executive body. Matters pertaining to athletics, debat- 
ing, student publications, social affairs, and general student inter- 
ests are given attention. The major part of the activity fee is used 
by this Board for the various student organizations. The Board 
cooperates with the college administration in building an intelli- 
gent appreciation of social responsibility in college community life. 

Athletics — In order to supplement the courses in physical edu- 
cation which are required of all freshmen and sophomores who are 
found upon examination to be physically able to carry the work, 
Bethany College maintains intramural and intercollegiate teams 
in many sports. All athletics and physical recreation are under the 
supervision of the Board of Athletic Control, which is made up of 
the faculty committee on athletics, appointed by the president of 
the college, and five members of the student body. The student 
members of this committee are chosen, one from each of the four 



136 Bethany College Bulletin 

classes in the college, and one from the Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion, each group selecting its own representative. 

Bethany has taken a position of leadership among tri-state col- 
leges by its established athletic policy, which eliminates all pro- 
fessionalism from its program. Intercollegiate competition in foot- 
ball, basketball, tennis, cross-country, track and field continues. 
An intramural program has been developed in order to provide 
opportunity for all to participate in some form of athletic en- 
deavor. Sports which are provided for on the intramural program 
are soccer, volleyball, swimming, archery, tennis, softball, hand- 
ball, hockey, basketball, and touch football. 

In connection with the physical conditioning program for its 
students, the college has constructed a six hundred yard obstacle 
course modeled after the course used in the Navy Pre-flight Train- 
ing Program. 

Students participating in intramural and intercollegiate ath- 
letics do so at their own risk. While the college assumes no respon- 
sibility for accidents or injuries of any kind, experienced coaches 
are provided and every precaution is taken to avoid hazards. Stu- 
dents are expected to have a complete physical examination each 
season. 

Association of Women Students — This Association, of which 
every woman student is automatically a member upon her en- 
trance into college, has as its main purpose the building of larger 
and wider life attitudes through giving the college woman a fuller 
opportunity for experience in leadership and for sharing with the 
college the responsibility for her conduct. 

Women's Athletic Association — The Women's Athletic As- 
sociation encourages and fosters the participation of all women of 
the college in swimming, the dance, and many different sports and 
games. The Athletic Board of the W. A. A. is made up of sports 
leaders of the college. A point system is in effect by which girls 
may earn the letter "B" and a sweater. At the annual W. A. A. 
banquet, three loving cups are awarded, one each to the winner 
of the archery, tennis, and swimming meets. 

Student Publications — Under the management of the Stu- 
dent Board of Publications the students publish the "Bethanian", 
issued at spaced intervals in magazine form to be compiled through- 
out the year into a final yearbook form. Since the Navy V-12 group 



Bethany College Bulletin 137 

has been on the campus, the "Bethanian" has been discontinued 
and has been succeeded by the "Bison" and most recently by the 
"Bethany Log." 

The students also print twice a week a small one-sheet publica- 
tion called "Tell" in which is published up-to-the-minute news of 
campus activities. 

The student fee covers the cost of these publications and every 
student is entitled to a copy of each issue. 

Ministerial Association — This association is made up of the 
young men of the student body who are preparing for the work of 
the Christian ministry. This group of students holds a prominent 
place in the life of the college. Fortnightly meetings are held, at 
which vital problems relating to the ministry and the churches are 
discussed. 

Y.W.C.A. — Membership in the Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation is open to all women students. This organization strives 
to serve religious, aesthetic, and social needs by conducting regular 
worship services, entertaining guest speakers from various fields, 
and sponsoring discussion groups concerning campus and personal 
problems. One of the projects of the organization is the main- 
tenance of the Dagney Andersen Memorial Library in Phillips 
Hall. 

Clubs and Societies — The following clubs and societies are 
sponsored by the various departments of the College: the Chemis- 
try Club, the French Club, the German Club, the Spanish Club, 
the International Relations Club, the Psychology Club, the Sociol- 
ogy Club, and the Writers' Club. Papers dealing with interesting 
topics are presented by students and faculty members. 

The H. T. McKinney Chapter of the Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica was chartered at the college in the fall of 1942. The chapter is 
an affiliate of the National Education Association of the United 
States. This organization meets bi-weekly for the discussion of 
problems in education. 

Fraternities — Several of the strong Greek letter fraternities 
have chapters at Bethany. The fraternities for men are: Beta 
Theta Pi, Sigma Nu, Phi Kappa Tau, Kappa Alpha, and Alpha 
Kappa Pi. The sororities for women are: Alpha Xi Delta, Zeta Tau 
Alpha, Kappa Delta, and Phi Mu. All have national affiliation. 



138 Bethany College Bulletin 

MUSIC AND DRAMATICS 

College Choir — This mixed chorus of thirty-six voices sings 
each Sunday morning at Bethany Memorial Church, and gives 
special programs, in and away from Bethany, including oratorios, 
cantata and miscellaneous works. Membership is open to all stu- 
dents accepted by the director. 

College Orchestra — This musical organization is made up of 
students who have proficiency on orchestral instruments. Admis- 
sion is gained by satisfactorily passing an individual examination 
given by the director. Several concerts are given during the year, 
and music is furnished for some of the dramatic performances. 

College Band — The college band is open to all students who 
show by individual examination a sufficient mastery of their in- 
strument for the type of music to be played. This organization 
plays for many public occasions throughout the year. 

Dramatics — The program of drama enjoys prominent place in 
the life of the college. Two clubs constitute the nuclei of play pro- 
duction: The Bethespian of open membership; and a chapter of the 
national dramatic fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, in which students 
may become members by meeting the national requirements. De- 
partmental clubs at times present plays and the choir collaborates 
in joint productions with the Bethespians. 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Student Scholarship — The average size of the classes as or- 
ganized enables the instructors to give each student individual at- 
tention; in many cases classes are divided into several sections to 
secure this result. At stated times students whose work in any de- 
partment is unsatisfactory are reported to the Admissions and 
Personnel Office by the instructor in charge of the work in ques- 
tion. A careful effort is made in each case to discover the cause of 
the trouble, and by giving encouragement, admonition, advice, or 
assistance, as appears to be needed, to put the student in the way 
of successfully carrying out his work. 

Classification of Students — The classification of students is 
determined at the beginning of each year according to the follow- 
ing plan: for sophomore rank a student must have at least twenty- 
five hours of academic credit and twenty-five quality points. Ad- 
mission to the upper division or full junior standing is conditioned 



Bethany College Bulletin" 139 

upon the student's having at least sixty hours of academic credit, 
sixty quality points, freshman orientation completed, and he must 
have passed the sophomore general examination. For senior class 
rank the student must have at least ninety-four hours of academic 
credit and ninety-four quality points, and have completed all pre- 
scribed courses for graduation. 

No student is considered a candidate for the baccalaureate de- 
gree until granted senior classification. 

The Grading System — The class standing of a student in 
courses pursued is reported by the use of letters. The meaning of 
letters used may be given as follows : 

A, Excellent — 3 quality points for each hour of credit. 

B, Good — 2 quality points for each hour of credit. 

C, Average — 1 quality point for each hour of credit. 

D, Inferior — Hour credits but not quality points given. 

con., Conditional Failure. The student is granted the privilege of 
taking an examination to remove the condition, or, in case 
of a continuous course, it may be automatically removed by 
the student making a grade of C or better the following 
semester. Failure to do so within the following semester will 
result in the grade being changed to F. Regardless of the 
manner of removing the condition no higher grade than D 
will be allowed. 

inc., This abbreviation denotes uncompleted work as a result of 
sickness or some other justifiable reason. An incomplete 
mark should be removed by the end of the fourth week of 
following semester, unless an extension of time is granted. 
It is not possible for a student to remove an incomplete 
mark after twelve months. 
F, Failure. The letter F denotes work that is definitely unsatis- 
factory and the course not passed. 
W, Withdrawn. The mark WF means that the student was 
failing at the time of withdrawal, and WP means that he 
was passing at the time of withdrawal. 

A report of the scholastic standing of students is received at the 
office of Admissions and Personnel at the mid-semester time in ad- 
dition to the final semester reports. These reports are sent to the 
faculty counselor of each student and to parents or guardian. 



140 Bethany College Bulletin • 

Probation — The term "on probation" is applied to students 
who are continued in college after having failed to satisfy academic 
requirements to a proper degree, or who, by reason of deportment, 
do not meet the standards expected by faculty and administration. 

A student shall be placed on probation for one semester if in the 
semester preceding he has failed to pass in nine hours of regular 
college work and earn at least six quality points. He shall be con- 
tinued on probation until the end of that semester. If he passes in 
twelve hours of college work and earns twelve quality points in the 
semester, he may be removed from probation. 

If he fails to pass twelve hours and earn twelve quality points, 
he can not be continued except by action of the Committee on Ad- 
missions and the recommendation of his faculty counselor. It is 
understood that one semester on probation is to be the limit and 
that it is not the intention of the faculty to have students continue 
in college if they do not do satisfactory academic work. Only in un- 
usual cases will a student be continued if he fails to meet the re- 
quirement set for probation students. 

A student who fails to pass in less than six hours of academic 
work in any one semester can not be continued into the next semes- 
ter. In case of unusual circumstances the Committee on Admis- 
sions may grant permission for the student to continue one semes- 
ter on probation or to be continued as an unclassified student. 

During the period of probation a student may be limited in his 
academic schedule, in participation in extra-curricular activities, 
or in social life. Such limitation may be imposed by his faculty 
counselor or by any proper officer of administration. The determi- 
nation of actual eligibility to participate in intercollegiate or ex- 
tra-curricular activities shall rest with the counselor and the Com- 
mittee on Admissions and Classifications. 

Provisional Enrollment — The term "provisional enroll- 
ment" is applied to the status of students who are permitted to en- 
roll for a provisional period of two weeks pending the receipt of 
secondary school record, the payment of the required amount on 
account, or pending the fulfillment of any other proper require- 
ment of the administration. This is intended to cover the cases 
with which the Dean of Students, the Committee on Admissions 
and Classifications, or the Bursar have to deal. 

Penalty for Late Registration — Students in attendance 
during any semester must register on the opening day of the follow- 



Bethany College Bulletin 141 

ing semester, if they desire to continue their work. For the first 
three days two dollars is charged for each day of delay in registra- 
tion and class absences will be counted against the student for all 
days missed. This rule does not relate to students entering for their 
first semester. 

Student's Schedule — A student ordinarily carries fifteen or 
sixteen credit hours of academic work each semester but it is pos- 
sible for a student to carry additional credit hours with the permis- 
sion of his counselor and the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications. Under the accelerated program a normal load is 
increased to eighteen hours. It is ordinarily expected that no stu- 
dent will carry more than nineteen credit hours in any one semes- 
ter. 

Courses should not be changed or dropped except within the 
first week at the start of any one semester. In special cases a change 
can be made in courses or schedule with the consent of the instruc- 
tors concerned, the student's counselor, and the Dean of the Fac- 
ulty. After the first week it is possible for a student to drop a course 
only if the counselor and the Dean feel that the best interests of 
the student will be served by such procedure. Students are not 
permitted to drop any course without adequate reason and ap- 
proval. 

Class Absences — Students are expected to attend all class or 
laboratory meetings of a course and to participate in any outside 
activities which are a part of the course. The final decision as to 
approving absences which may be required because of illness or 
urgent matters of any kind is in the hands of the Dean of the Fac- 
ulty and, in case of illness, the college doctor or the college nurse. 
Proper penalties or requirements may be imposed by any instruc- 
tor for absences of any kind. 

Students of superior ability and achievement are often allowed 
much freedom in the matter of class attendance and specific re- 
quirements. 

Withdrawal — An honorable discharge will be granted to any 
student who is in good academic standing and is not subject to 
discipline, who may desire to withdraw from the college, if he has 
satisfied his counselor and a respsonsible officer of the college, that 
there is a reason sufficiently potent to justify such action. Stu- 
dents asking to withdraw should present such a request to the 
counselor with a written statement of approval from parent or 



142 Bethany College Bulletin 

guardian. The recommendation of the counselor should then be 
presented to the Provost for final approval and record. No with- 
drawal will be considered complete until this action has been 
taken. 

Special Examinations — A student who has been marked Con- 
ditional (Con) in a course at the end of a semester may, with the 
consent of the instructor, be given an opportunity to take a second 
final examination on the payment of a fee of $2.00. Fees for special 
final examinations and other regularly scheduled tests must be 
paid at the office of the Bursar before the examinations are taken. 
The Bursar's receipt must be presented to the instructor at the 
time of the examination and delivered by the instructor to the 
Recorder together with the grade given the student. 

The fee for special examinations may be remitted by the Dean 
of the Faculty in which case his approval must be secured in lieu 
of the statement from the Bursar's office. 

Report of Student's Progress — At any time parents or 
guardians are free to request further information concerning the 
development, ability, and progress of a student. Requests should 
be made to the Provost or the Recorder. 

Advance Enrollment — All students of the college are obliged 
to fill out advance enrollment blanks indicating the courses of 
study planned for the coming year, In the case of freshmen, these 
courses are selected under the direction of the freshman counselors. 
In the case of students who have selected a major, the professor in 
charge of the department elected will counsel regarding the stu- 
dent's curriculum. 

Transfer of Records — Students wishing to transfer from 
Bethany College to another institution should request the Admis- 
sions and Personnel Office to send an official transcript of record 
and notice of honorable dismissal, giving notice of at least one 
week. One transcript is furnished for each student without charge; 
for each additional record a fee of one dollar is charged; this fee to 
be sent to the office with the request. All financial obligations to 
the college must be paid before a transcript can be issued. 

Fraternity and Sorority Initiation — Students shall not be 
initiated into any fraternity or sorority until they have satisfied 
entrance requirements of the college, have fifteen hours of resident 
collegiate work credited on the college books, and have earned at 
least fifteen resident quality points. 



Bethany College Bulletin 143 

Junior Year Abroad— Specially qualified students may substi- 
tute for the work of the junior year in the college a year of study 
in France or in Germany, under the supervision of the Foreign 
Study Plan of the University of Delaware. To be eligible for the 
junior year abroad, the student ordinarily must have an average 
grade of B or over in the work of the first three semesters. Each 
application must be approved by the Dean of the Faculty and the 
department concerned. Any student who may wish to avail him- 
self of this opportunity must present the request in writing to the 
Committee on Admissions and Classifications before the end of the 
first semester of his sophomore year. This plan has been suspended 
for the duration of the war by order of the State Department. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

Medical and Physical Examination — A medical and physical 
examination of every new student is made during the first weeks 
of the college year by the college physician. It is strongly recom- 
mended that all students be examined at least once each year by 
the family physician and dentist. All students are expected to be 
vaccinated and to have tuberculin and blood tests either at home 
or at the college dispensary. 

Vaccination — All applicants for admission must have been 
vaccinated within the past three years, or they must arrange to be 
vaccinated by the Student Health Service within one month after 
entrance unless excused by the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications. 

Physical Education — All students are required to take ac- 
tivities courses in physical education and, in either the freshman 
or the sophomore year, a course of lectures in personal hygiene. An 
elementary course in mental hygiene is offered as an elective in the 
Department of Education. These courses carry regular college 
credit. 

Sickness — Each student is expected to report to the college 
dispensary in case of sickness of any kind. In the case of con- 
tagious or infectious disease, students will be expected to give ab- 
solute observance to any regulations which may be prescribed by 
the college officers or the country health officials. 

The college physician is at the dispensary each day for consulta- 
tion, examination, and treatment. Students are urged to report all 
injuries, diseases, or untoward symptoms, no matter how trivial 



144 Bethany College Bulletin 

they may seem. No extensive medical or surgical procedures are 
carried out at the dispensary but all minor ailments will be cared 
for, and some medicines will be supplied. Arrangements can be 
made for vaccinations, cold serums, and special treatment. The 
college physician is available for consultation and professional 
service without charge only at the dispensary. 

Students are required to report all illnesses which entail ab- 
sences from 8:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. classes to the house hostess 
or faculty resident before 9:00 a.m. The hostess will call the col- 
lege nurse at the dispensary and inform the nurse if the student is 
unable to report there. Students may not call to request nursing 
services outside the dispensary. They should clear these matters 
through the house hostess, faculty resident or officials of the col- 
lege. 

Dispensary hours are daily except Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 11 :oo 
a.m. Daily except Saturday and Sunday, 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Sunday, 1 130 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 

Students are free to employ either the college physician or a 
physician of their own choice in any case of illness. Other well 
trained physicians are available in Wellsburg and Wheeling. 

Infirmary — The college infirmary in charge of the college nurse 
and her assistant is maintained while college is in session. It in- 
cludes the doctor's office, treatment room, medicine room, and 
wards for men and women. The infirmary is not open for dispen- 
sary service, diagnosis or treatment, and the services of the college 
physician are not available there without charge. It is intended 
only for bed-patients. The college nurse is in charge of the infirm- 
ary and is available at all hours at the college dispensary or in- 
firmary for emergencies, but she is not subject to call for minor 
matters, dispensary service, or any services that can be cared for 
at the college dispensary during regular office hours. Situations 
calling for special attention elsewhere should be reported to the 
resident or house hostess or an official of the college. If special 
professional services are required the costs of the same will be at 
the expense of the student. In case of need each student is entitled 
to three days of care in the infirmary with no additional charge. 
For periods in excess of this time a nominal charge of $1.00 per 
day is made. Students not boarding in college dining halls will be 
charged $1.00 per day for board during the period of hospitaliza- 
tion. 



Bethany College Bulletin 145 

SOCIAL REGULATIONS 

Student Residence — No student in any college year shall be 
permitted to reside or board in any place which has not been listed 
as approved. Fraternity and sorority houses, private dwellings, 
and dormitory rooms where students are living, must at all times 
be open for inspection and appraisal as to influences and conditions 
relating to morals, health, and social culture. All freshmen are re- 
quired to live in the college dormitories through the entire first 
year. 

Social Life — The men and women of the college meet under 
conditions intended to provide a pleasant and wholesome social 
life. A reasonable amount of social recreation is encouraged, 
though such diversion is restricted within limits considered most 
favorable to the welfare of the students. It is understood and ex- 
pected that all students will observe the usual social conventions 
and individual students will be governed by discretion and regard 
for propriety, without the existence of minute and specific rules. 
Immorality, drinking, or other gross misconduct on the part of 
students may result in immediate suspension or dismissal from the 
college. 

The women of the college live either in Phillips Hall, Helwig 
House, Gateway Hall or in sorority houses. Each is presided over 
by a house hostess or a faculty resident. The Academic Adviser for 
Women is in charge of the general supervision of the college 
women, with the direct responsibility for regulation of social life, 
residence and social privileges, etc., in charge of the Head of Resi- 
dence for Women. 

The dormitory for men affords at once a home for residents 
therein, and a center for the activities of the men of the college. 
Fraternity houses offer living accommodations for some of the up- 
perclassmen. 

All student organizations are required to obtain permission from 
the Head of Residence for Women before giving an entertainment 
or function of any kind either on or off the campus. A social calen- 
dar is kept in her office in which all public functions must be regis- 
tered in advance. 

Student Conduct — In the administration of college regula- 
tions it is the policy of the administration to be guided in the treat- 
ment of the individual cases largely by the recommendation of the 
student's counselor and by the general attitude of the student 



146 Bethany College Bulletin 

toward the college, i.e., whether or not he has proved himself a 
creditable member of the college community, as shown by regular- 
ity in attendance, promptness in the fulfillment of his obligations, 
earnestness in his endeavors to profit by the college opportunities, 
and in consideration of high standards in social and moral conduct. 

The whole record of each student will be looked into at the end 
of each semester with reference to his conduct in the community as 
well as his academic attainments. If the student's conduct has been 
unsatisfactory and is likely to remain so, the administration will 
consider whether the student is justifying his candidacy for a col- 
lege degree. Students who do not show promise of accomplishment 
will not be allowed to continue. It is expected that a student who 
earns credits at Bethany College must satisfy the faculty as to up- 
rightness of character as well as accomplishments in scholarship. 

It is earnestly desired that undergraduates may be influenced to 
good conduct and good scholarship by higher motives than fear of 
punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the courtesy and gener- 
ous feeling natural to young men and women engaged in liberal 
pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of conduct. It is the 
policy of the college administration and faculty to allow in all 
things as much liberty as will not be abused, and the students are 
invited and expected to cooperate with the faculty and college 
officers. Students are answerable for their conduct during vacation 
no less than in term time. 

There is no need for students to maintain automobiles in Beth- 
any and they have proved a detriment to scholarship and a tempta- 
tion to waste much time. The maintenance of an automobile or 
motorcycle in Bethany or vicinity without the permission of the 
college faculty is positively forbidden. 

Changes in Regulation Covering Courses of Study, De- 
grees, Discipline, Etc. — The college administration reserves the 
right to amend the regulations covering the granting of degrees, 
the courses of study, and the conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of a degree are privileges, not 
rights. The college reserves the right, and the student concedes to 
the college the right, to require the withdrawal of any student at 
any time without explanation or trial. 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN COURSE 

On October 24, 1943 

Bachelor of Arts 





Cum Laude 




Jane Walls 




Rite 


Tony Bubka 
Robert Husband 
Donald Kramer 


Ruth Rutherford 
Shirley Tidwell 


Bachelor of Science 




Cum Laude 




Joseph La Barre 




Rite 


Charles Foy 
John Hudak 


Carlos Jaramillo 
Raymond LeStrange 



SENIORS PASSING COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 
WITH DISTINCTION OCTOBER 1943 

Joseph La Barre Biology 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN COURSE 

On February 27, 1944 

Bachelor of Arts 

Summa Cum Laude 
Phyllis Hendrickson 

Magna Cum Laude 
Irene Jassen 

Cum Laude 
Donald T. Boyd 



Rite 



Gloria Bass 
Jean Belknap 
Mary Louise Bower 
Virginia Downes 
Jeanne Goodwin 
Patricia Harvey 



Marjorie Hunter 
Anne Michael 
Mary Elizabeth Smith 
Jane Sturman 
Eleanor Throckmorton 
Evelyn Van Strien 



Bachelor of Science 



Frederick Albrecht, Jr. 



Robert Alexander 
Jack Baumgartner 
(as of the class of 
October 24, 1943) 



Cum Laude 



Rite 



Bernice Monczynski 



Laure Garner 
Betty Lue Hood 
Frances Thomas 



SENIORS PASSING COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 
WITH DISTINCTION FEBRUARY 1944 

Phyllis Hendrickson Journalism 



DEGREES 


CONFERRED IN COURSE 




On June i8, 1944 




Bachelor of Arts 




Summa Cum Laude 




John Taylor 




Cum Laude 




Mary Jane Heifer 
Jane Land 




Rite 


Marie Alexy 
Carol Alliger 
Ellajane Bishop 
Lee Fiess 


Eunice Johnston 
Evelyn Jones 
1 Audrey Pudlin 

Edna Turner 




Bachelor of Science 




Magna Cum Laude 
Mary Helen Reed 




Cum Laude 




Earl Lowery 


Lois Keiser 
Sheldon Kohan 


Rite 

Jeanne Lois Matheny 
Melvin Sweeney 



HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED 

On June 18, 1944 
Doctor of Laws 

Brigadier General Frank T. Hines 
Senator Robert A. Taft 

Doctor of Divinity 

Captain Frederick W. Heifer, Chaplain, Army of the United States 

Doctor of Letters 

Richard B. Scandrett, Jr. 

Doctor of Humane Letters 

Argyle Campbell 

SENIORS PASSING COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 
WITH DISTINCTION 1 943-1 944 

Mary Helen Reed Biology 

John Taylor English 



ROSTER OF STUDENTS 

i 943-1 944 

Seniors — Class of 1944 

Albrecht, Frederick 1620 Vance Ave., Coraopolis, Pa. 

Alexander, Robert 400 Woodlawn Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Alexy, Marie R.F.D. 1, Washington, Pa. 

Alliger, Carol 2 Hill St., Tonawanda, N.Y. 

Barnes, Beverly 21 18 Commerce St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Bass, Gloria 1222 Pacific St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Belknap, Jean 705 Ecton Rd., Akron, Ohio 

Bell, Charles Oakdale Rd., East McKeesport, Pa. 

Bishop, Ellajane 4328 Birchwood Ave., Ashtabula, Ohio 

Bower, Mary Lou 482 Colbert Ave., Oil City, Pa. 

Boyd, Donald Thompson Box 1240, Huntington (14), W.Va. 

Brooks, Gladys 602 Edna St., Connellsville, Pa. 

Bubka, Tony Mather, Pa. 

Bullard, Robert 114 Wheeling Ave., Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Carstensen, Harold 3541 Douglas Rd., Toledo, Ohio 

Chapman, Barbara 605 Freeport Rd., New Kensington, Pa. 

Cunningham, Merle Fredericktown, Pa. 

Downes, Virginia 227 Holland Ave., Braddock, Pa. 

Fiess, Emma Lee Fourth St., New Martinsville, W.Va. 

Ganz, Rita 80 Avenue P, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Goodwin, Jeanne Broadview Blvd., Brackenridge, Pa. 

Gourevitch (Garner), Laure Box 252, Ellijay, Ga. 

Harrington, Nancy Pleasant Ave., R.F.D. 3, Hamburg, N.Y. 

Harvey, Patricia 15 Gaynor Ave., Manhasset, L.I., N.Y. 

Heifer, Mary Jane Box 1924, Fort Benning, Ga. 

Hendrickson, Phyllis 2407 Meadowwood Dr., Toledo, Ohio 

Hood, Betty Lue 401 Castle Shannon Rd., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Hudak, John 610 Federal St., McKees Rocks, Pa. 

Hunter, Marjorie 1016 Maple St., Natrona Heights, Pa. 

Husband, Robert 624 Cliff St., Bellevue, Pa. 

Jaramillo, Carlos Plaza San Martin 138, Lima, Peru 

Jassen, Irene 47 Pratt St., Winsted, Conn. 

Johnston, Eunice 13613 Cormere Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 

Jones, Evelyn Bethany, W.Va. 

Jordan, Jeanne 720 Valley View Rd., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Joseph, Mary Virginia 121 St. James PI., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Judy, Ruth 120 Bell Ave., Dover, Ohio 

Keiser, Lois Lake Lynn, Pa. 

Kohan, Sheldon 4600 Ninth Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Kramer, Donald 130 Overlook Dr., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

LaBarre, Joseph 1800 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Land, Jane 7001 Woodland Ave., Ben Avon, Pa. 



Bethany College Bulletin 151 

Landgrebe, Elaine 1857 Burnette Ave., East Cleveland, Ohio 

LeStrange, Raymond 6072 Madison St., Bridgewood, L.I., N.Y. 

Lowery, Earl 308 E. Patterson Ave., Connellsville, Pa. 

Matheny, Jeanne Lois 6 Winchell Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 

Michael, Ann 3549 86th St., Jackson Heights, L.I., N.Y. 

Monczynski, Bernice 58 Decker St., Buffalo, N.Y. 

McCracken, Esther 112 Pennsylvania Ave., Cameron, W.Va. 

Padden, John 843 Hanover St., Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Pudlin, Audrey 12 West 72nd St., New York, N.Y. 

Puglisi, Anthony S$ Underhill St., Tuckahoe, N.Y. 

Reed, Mary Helen 2196 Market St., Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Reusche, Frank 2130 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 

Rutherford, Ruth 245 Jefferson Ave., Washington, Pa. 

Rylander, Jean Country Club Rd., Fairmont, W.Va. 

Sabol, Evelyn 3050 Orchard, Weirton, W.Va. 

Skilton, Shirley Strong Terrace, Wins ted, Conn. 

Smith, Mary Elizabeth 360 Franklin St., Marion, Ohio 

Stealey, Robert 1102 19th St., Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Sturman, Jane 914 Summer PI., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Sweeney, Melvin 243 Wills Rd., Connellsville, Pa. 

Taylor, John 11 81 Sunset View Dr., Akron, Ohio 

Thomas, Frances Box 318, Russells Point, Ohio 

Throckmorton, Eleanor 275 W. Franklin St., Waynesburg, Pa. 

Tidwell, Shirley 229 60th St., West New York, N.J. 

Tomasek, Nancy R.F.D. 4, Box 182B, Uniontown, Pa. 

Turner, Edna 2525 Morris Ave., New York, N.Y. 

Van Strien, Evelyn 1 1 1 W. Fifth St., Bayonne, N.J. 

Walls, Jane 426 Boyles Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Whetstone, Janet Forest Ave., Hopwood, Pa. 

Wilkin, Mary 1453 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Young, J. Donald 805 Charles St., Carnegie, Pa. 

Zingher, Henry 663 Grassmere Terrace, Far Rockaway, L.I., N.Y. 

Juniors — Class of 1945 

Ball, Patricia 633 Main St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Bannen, Elizabeth 223 Isabella St., Oakmont, Pa. 

Barton, Jesse 423 Elm St., Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Bright, Dorothy 15611 Walden Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Bright, Martha May R.F.D. 1, Verona Rd., Verona, Pa. 

Brooke, Eleanor Hugart St., Confluence, Pa. 

Buccieri, Mary 900 Brookline Blvd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Buechley, Frank R.F.D. 3, Box 541, Johnstown, Pa. 

Burnett, Shirley 3405 Kossuth Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 

Burns, Marion 24 DeKalb St., Tonawanda, N.Y. 

Cowen, Nancy 3833 Highland Ave., Shadyside, Ohio 

Culley, Marian 618 Hawthorne Ave., Kittanning, Pa. 

DeFede, Anton 1425 Commerce St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Finley, James Brilliant, Ohio 



152 Bethany College Bulletin 

Flint, Janet Martha Rd., Harrington Park, N J. 

Foley, Betty 4246 Franklin St., Bellaire, Ohio 

Galm, June ' 58 Elm Ave., Floral Park, N.Y. 

Gay, Charlotte Bethany, W.Va. 

Gilbert, Pauline Bethany, W.Va. 

Golden, Helen 2201 Richland Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Goss, Aimee 2213 Vance Ave., Warwood, W.Va. 

Governato, Kay Amsterdam, Ohio 

Grimshaw, Eugenia 101 Wayne St., Aliquippa, Pa. 

Harvey, Alice 205 Fifteenth St., N.E., Washington (2), D.C. 

Houghton, Winifred Dodd St., Box 152, Middlebourne, W.Va. 

Ishino, Sakaye 7-3-A Rohwer Relocation Branch, McGehee, Ark. 

Johnson, Frances 24 Robinson St., Uniontown, Pa. 

Jones, Betty 51 LaSalle Ave., Kenmore, N.Y. 

Karp, Olga Sheridan Lane, Boonton, N.J. 

Kolson, Harriet 325 79th St., North Bergen, N.J. 

Kruse, Carol 146 81 St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Lehrer, Sylvia 31-82-36^1 St., Astonia, L.I. City, N.Y. 

Myers, Julian Center Ave., Burgettstown, Pa. 

McCandless, Esther 407 Welsh St., Chester, Pa. 

Northrup, George Bethany, W.Va. 

Perry, Virginia 501 Duquesne Rd., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Reske, Betty Ann 3120 Wabash St., Detroit, Mich. 

Rimko, Velma 603 Romine Ave., McKeesport, Pa. 

Rodgers, Ruth Bethany, W.Va. 

Schwab, Willi 2424 Pine Ave., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Shaffer, Betty 473 Carnegie Dr., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Shockley, Evelyn 2908 Brownsville Rd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Steinberg, Herman 200 Northland Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Steiniger, Dan 709 Warwood Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Stewart, Virginia 119 Nicholas St., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Todd, Annabelle 59 Stuyvesant Ave., Larchmont, N.Y. 

Wagner, Ruth Burkham Ct., Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Waterman, Roger 132 W. 22nd St., Erie, Pa. 

Waugh, Marilyn R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Weimer, Margaret Bethany, W.Va. 

White, Charline Bethany, W.Va. 

Sophomores — Class of 1946 

Alexander, Jean R.F.D. I, Box 421, Turtle Creek, Pa. 

Anderson, Peggy 359 W. Park Ave., Mansfield, Ohio 

Angelis, James 17 Tenth St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Baker, Betty Lou 906 N. Hickory St., Scottdale, Pa. 

Bertschy, Sarah 624 Main St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Brendlin, Velma 37-°4 Bowne St., Flushing, N.Y. 

Brown, Anne 762 Lebanon Ave., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Brownfield, Mary Belmont Circle, Uniontown, Pa. 

Bryan, Evelyn * 804 Market St., Toronto, Ohio 



Bethany College Bulletin 153 

Burtis, Evelyn 322 Cedar Blvd., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Cantrall, Rebecca 507 Stanley Ave., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Chason, Alvin 1237 Woodcrest Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 

Coners, Margaret 40 Oakland Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Crimm, Molly 3122 Wainbell Ave., Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 

D'Aliberti, Alfred 131 8 Park St., Steubenville, Ohio 

Davies, Pauline 258 Wychwood Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 

Edgar, Mary 365 S. Atlantic Ave., E.E., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ellis, Jean. 1813 Virginia St., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Fagan, Patricia 500 W. End Ave., New York, N.Y. 

Fessler, Eileen 61 Lloyd Ave., Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Germon, Sara R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Harries, Elizabeth 1333 Arlington Ave., Steubenville, Ohio 

Humphrey, Shirley Main St., Tiltonsville, Ohio 

Hutchinson, Harry 13245 Western Ave., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jameson, Lois 73 Koster Row, Eggertsville, N.Y. 

Jewell, Richard Belleview Heights, Bellaire, Ohio 

Jones, Katherine Box 496, R.F.D. 10, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jones, Sandra Lee 2 Williams St., Uniontown, Pa. 

Kammen, Harold 212 W. 85th St., New York, N.Y. 

Keefe, Jane 221 N. Elmwood Ave., Medina, Ohio 

Kerfoot, Frances 5 Lebanon Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 

Koller, Millicent 4989 Atcheson Rd., Bellaire, Ohio 

Lancaster, La'Reva 75°6 Church Ave., Ben Avon, Pa. 

Malin, Myra 13945 Lake Ave., Lakewood, Ohio 

Marron, Lorraine 30 Crescent Ave., Babylon, N.Y. 

Michaels, Rhoda 4 Burnside Ave., Lawrence, N.Y. 

Miles, Phyllis 116 Moore Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 

Monczynski, Dorothy 58 Decker St., Buffalo, N.Y. 

McDaniel, Esther 16596 Harlow Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

McMullen, Jane 10 Franklin Ave., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Opie, Martha 1540 Asbury Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pardew, Betty Lee 1562 Tolma Ave., Dormont, Pa. 

Paulson, Anna Mary 45 Derrick Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 

Phillips, Irving ■ 1677 Weston Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 

Rankin, Janet 1510 Vance Ave., Coraopolis, Pa. 

Repp, Frances R.F.D. 2, New Kensington, Pa. 

Ripley, Myra > 541 Highland Place, Bellevue, Pa. 

Robinson, Claire 206 Chapman Ave., Bellmore, N.Y. 

Rose, Barbara Kate 511 S. Niagara, Tonawanda, N.Y. 

Saeltzer, Doris 58 Elm Ave., Floral Park, N.Y. 

Scheer, Robert 2280 Loring Place, New York, N.Y. 

Shankroff, Dorris 857 Park Place, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Singer, Alvin 1206 Haddon Ave., Camden, N.J. 

Smith, Katherine 30 Maryland St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Smith, Robert 360 Franklin St., Marion, Ohio 

Spiegel, Hans 99-58 66th Ave., Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Stevenson, Altha 30 Elmwood St., Crafton, Pa. 



154 Bethany College Bulletin 

Stimmel, Thomas 189 Franklin Ave., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Stuart, Mary 107 Fahnestock Rd., Aspinwall, Pa. 

Teater, Marjorie 130 S. Park St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Truxal, Louise Box 156, First St., Manor, Pa. 

Ulrich, Paul 11 Birch Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Wassmann, Karl 135 N. 17th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Waugh, Patricia R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Welsh, Norma Jean 563 Fourth St., Butler, Pa. 

Whitehead, Nancy Harrison City Rd., Manor, Pa. 

Williams, Juanita 3713 Highland Ave., Shadyside, Ohio 

Wilson, Joan 519 Tenth St., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Wilson, Joyce Sandy Beach Rd., Grand Island, N.Y. 

Winski, Marjorie 191 5 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Wolf, Carolyn 1504 Hildreth Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Woodhouse, Betty 310 E. Highland Ave., Ravenna, Ohio 

Wright, Frances Wilson Mills Rd., S. Euclid, Ohio 

Freshmen — Class of 1947 

Ammon, Emma Lou 4 America Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Becker, Walter 105-18 29th Ave., E. Elmhurst, N.Y. 

Benson, Thamar Seventh St., R.F.D. 2, New Kensington, Pa. 

Bode, Doris 134 Hemphill St., N.S., Pittsburgh (14), Pa. 

Bower, Barbara Fort Steuben Hotel, Steubenville, Ohio 

Brindley, Robert 2824 Chapline St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Brown, Kathryn Fleming Ave., Fairmont, W.Va. 

Cain, Anaruth 119 Wayne St., Claysville, Pa. 

Cain, James 1577 W. Market St., Steubenville, Ohio 

Cambeis, Marjorie 246 Battery Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Chambers, Margaret Ann 1030 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Christy, Thelma R.F.D. 2, New Kensington, Pa. 

Clark, Marjorie 16850 Santa Rosa Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Cramblett, Patricia Meyersdale, Pa. 

Darrah, Marjorie 219 N. Front St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Davidson, Marjorie 347 E. Liberty St., Girard, Ohio 

Davis, David 213 S. Wayne St., St. Marys, Ohio 

Dickinson, Elizabeth 375 Riverside Dr., New York, N.Y. 

Eaton, Aimee 2106 Sunset Blvd., Steubenville, Ohio 

Eoff, Catherine 1017 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Ertle, Kathleen Avella Heights, Avella, Pa. 

Ertle, Walter Avella Heights, Avella, Pa. 

Fette, Evelyn R.F.D. 2, Alan Rd., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Finney, Lois 147 Mason Dr., Glenshaw, Pa. 

Fletcher, Louise 3546 Jacob St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Fox, Jean 2220 Marshall Ave., Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Frisch, Alan 54 Evelyn Place, New York (53), N.Y. 

Gallagher, Doris 148 37th St., Union City, N.J. 

Gibbons, Rita 21600 Roberts Ave., Euclid, Ohio 

Gordon, Mary Josephine 125 Linden Ave., Pittsburgh (18), Pa. 



Bethany College Bulletin . 155 

Hare, Andrew W. Alexander, Pa. 

Harvey, Carolyn 840 High St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Heinlein, Bernice 423 Hill St., Sistersville, W.Va. 

Heinrichs, Eleanor Jo 311 Washington Ave., Oakmont, Pa. 

Henshaw, Dorcas R.F.D. 1, Box 24, Uniontown, Pa. 

Hixson, Barbara 324 Orchard Dr., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Hudson, Vera R.F.D. 1, Laurel, Dela. 

Hughes, James 3 Corliss Terr., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Jobes, Alvin 68 Oakland Ave., Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Kahn, Stephen 513 S. Huron St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Kerr, Betty Jane 11406 Frankstown Rd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Lathrop, Frances 514 Magnolia St., Toledo, Ohio 

Madison, Mildred 211 Kickapoo Terr., Peoria, 111. 

Mason, Shirley 77 18th St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Meissner, Marie 241 Academy Ave., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Mickels, Beverly 318 Sumner Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Mourat, Nick 200 Cove Rd., Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

McGhee, Brooke 214 W. Main St., Lock Haven, Pa. 

McLaughlin, Ann 2973 Glenmore Ave., Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 

Nawotka, Amelia 23 Sherman St., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Newman, Jay 2136 Grand Concourse, New York, N.Y. 

Onasch, Shirley 33-15 80th St., Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

Ott, Patricia 68 St. Johns Ave., Kenmore, N.Y. 

Peters, Ralph 66-67 Fresh Pond Rd., Ridgewood, L.I., N.Y. 

Pisciotta, Toinette 1466 77th St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Powell, Jean Main St., Brilliant, Ohio 

Prosser, George 712 Charles St., Carnegie, Pa. 

Pushkarow, Dorothy 213 49th St., Union City, N.J. 

Rauscher, Mary 19 Pearl Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Rebholz, Ruth 109 Main Entrance Dr., Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 

Reuther, Betty 1056 Broadway, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Ridley, Jean 75 Fire Island Ave., Babylon, N.Y. 

Scholten, Rosalind Amwell Rd., Neshanic, N.J. 

Schoonmaker, Lois 717 Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio 

Schultz, Suzanne 510 Walnut St., E. Liverpool, Ohio 

Scott, Norma Jean Rogersville, Pa. 

Shaffer, Joan 473 Carnegie Dr., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Shoemaker, Virginia Sylvan Place, Haworth, N.J. 

Slobodkin, Lawrence 106 W. 69th St., New York (23), N.Y. 

Smith, Betty Jean 290 N. Wells St., Sistersville, W.Va. 

Snyder, Mary 340 Beach 91 St., Rockaway Beach, N.Y. 

Stacko, Mary R.F.D. 1, Avella, Pa. 

Strachan, Helen 709 Sampson St., Monongahela, Pa. 

Swimmer, Wolford 89 Lincoln St., Uniontown, Pa. 

Truman, Betty Lee 241 McClelland town Rd., Uniontown, Pa. 

Turnamian, Virginia 4528 Hudson Ave., Union City, N.J. 

Vogt, Shirley 199 King St., E. Aurora, N.Y. 

Weinrich, Marcel 1434 Morris Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 



156 Bethany College Bulletin 

Wells, Arthur Newell, W.Va. 

Wheaton, Glenn 1705 2nd St., Mounds ville, W.Va. 

Wilkin, William 1453 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Wohrley, Ivan Fairview Rd., Newark, Ohio 

Zettler, Howard 44 Florence Ave., Norwood, Mass. 

Zinsmeister, Thelma 1521 Grandin Ave., Dormont, Pa. 

Special Students 

Carnahan, Gladys Bethany, W.Va. 

Johnson, John Clark Bethany, W.Va. 

Sanchez, Azalea Avenida la entre calles 33/3$) San Jose, Costa Rica 

Sarver, Hilda Bethany, W.Va. 

Zbiec, Wanda Bethany, W.Va. 



ROSTER OF NAVY V-12 STUDENTS 

1 943-1 944 

Acker, Thomas Sylvester .'.R.F.D. 2, Enon Valley, Pa. 

Adams, Joseph Robert 2420 Vance Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Afflerbach, Harry ' Pine Tree Dr., Miami Beach, Fla. 

Agraphiotis, Arthur 316 Coltart Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Albert, Daniel 208 Jefferson Ave., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Allen, Donald 304 Meadow Ave., Charleroi, Pa. 

Altemus, Braden 811 Vickroy Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 

Anderson, Naaman Walkertown Station, Hazard, Ky. 

Armstrong, Duane R.F.D. 3, Elm Grove. W.Va. 

Atalski, Walter Peter 838 Ridge Ave., McKees Rocks, Pa. 

Atkinson, Roderick 1506 N. Rhodes St., Arlington, Va. 

Ayers, Richard 2725 N. 23rd Rd., Arlington, Va. 

Babyak, Michael Alex Box 75, Crucible, Pa. 

Bagosi, Joseph 304 Jefferson Ave., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Baily, Alfred South St., Carmichaels, Pa. 

Bair, Robert L 108 Banyon Dr., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Baldwin, William Mt. Etna Blvd., Connellsville, Pa. 

Bannon, Richard Paul 47 McMunn Ave., Pittsburgh (5), Pa. 

Barberio, Joseph R 722 4th St., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Barberio, Salvadore Box 2, Dawmont, W.Va. 

Barth, Emerson Hugh Colonial Dr., R.F.D. 3, Youngstown, Ohio 

Baskin, Jerome 185 Henderson Ave., Washington, Pa. 

Bassett, Harry 521 1 Keystone St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Batlas, John 235 Spruce St., Morgantown, W.Va. 

Baumgartner, Jack 432 S. 6th St., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Beach, Cornell 142 Barrett Ave., Jamestown, N.Y. 

Beard, Arthur 32 N. Front St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Belt, W. Duane W. 23rd St., Bellaire, Ohio 

Benjamin, Robert Rices Landing, Pa. 



Bethany College Bulletin 157 

Bennett, James Gordon 1025 Trenton Ave., Edgewood, Pa. 

Bennett, John Mather, Pa. 

Berg, Karl Joseph 52 Bryant St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 

Berger, Ervin Apt Box 81, Jefferson, Pa. 

Birchard, Raymond F R.F.D. 3, Cambridge Springs, Pa. 

Bisceglia, Charles 10 Connoquessing Terr., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Boice, Joseph E 13 18 37th St., Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Bolgiano, Charles 4014 Hamilton St., Hyattsville, Md. 

Bollens, Alfred 232 N. Fairmount Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Booher, David Oscar Trenton, Ky. 

Borland, James 1309 Beech St., Cheswick, Pa. 

Braunstein, Lee 1558 Jackson St., Charleston, W.Va. 

Brendle, Dorsey R.F.D. 7, Box 41 1, Johnstown, Pa. 

Browder, Walter 2633 Washington Ave., St. Albans, W.Va. 

Brown, Edward R.F.D. 1, Box 715, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Brown, Richard 1706 Virginia St. E., Charleston (1), W.Va. 

Brown, Warren R.F.D. 4, Pottstown, Pa. 

Buck, Rudolph 3002 Walnut St., McKeesport, Pa. 

Burford, Cecil. .. R.F.D. 1, Poca, W.Va. 

Bush, Donald Cochran 205 Hancock Ave., Vandergrift, Pa. 

Butler, James Winfield Box 126, Uniontown, Ohio 

Butler, Robert 1217 Collis St., Charleston, W.Va. 

Cales, Warren Box 103, Sandstone, W.Va. 

Campbell, Frederick Hadley 129 4th St.. McDonald, Pa. 

Carder, Ervin 59 Chicago St., Salem, W.Va. 

Carlisle, William 514 Superior St., Port Huron, Mich. 

Carney, James Wallace 103 1 Leishman Ave., New Kensington, Pa. 

Catania, Alexander 171 Thomas St., Monongah, W.Va. 

Caughey, John M Wurtemburg Rd., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Ceisler, Ralph James 102 Hall Ave., Washington, Pa. 

Chaimovitz, Robert 116 Locust St., Aliquippa, Pa. 

Chapman, Carl R.F.D. 1, Hammond, W.Va. 

Charrance, Edward 1640 Suburban Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Chetlin, Norman 532 Grandview Ave., E. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Childs, Robert R 2326 Bellefield St., Youngstown, Ohio 

Ciccotelli, Nick 745 10th St., Pitcairn, Pa. 

Clark, Dwane 225 Locust St., Meadville, Pa. 

Clark, James Beans 19 Oakmont Rd., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Clark, Walter 222 Plumer Ave., Emsworth, Pa. 

Clary, Paul Joseph 1221 Oak Grove Ave., Steubenville, Ohio 

Clawson, Frederic R.F.D. 2, Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Cloudsley, Donald 711 Crescent Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Clowes, George Brant Rd., Ingomar, Pa. 

Coe, Roger Lee R.F.D. 3, Cortland, Ohio 

Cohen, Morris 201 i-B 38th St., S.E., Washington, D.C. 

Colavincenzo, John 904 Crescent Ave., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Coleman, James 921 Farragut St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Collins, Harry 35 Derrick Ave., Uniontown, Pa. 



158 Bethany College Bulletin 

Constante, William 369 Race St., Morgan town, W.Va. 

Coon, Philip Leslie .3417 7th Ave., Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Copenhaver, Edward Clifton 401 Bluemont St., Grafton, W.Va. 

Copley, Carlyle : 621 Russell St., Charleston, W.Va. 

Cornwell, Clifton 229 Randolph St., (N.E.), Washington, D.C. 

Costine, John S. Marietta St., St. Clairsville, Ohio 

Crable, William 223 2nd St., Mather, Pa. 

Crawford, Thomas Ralph 316 Pensdale St., Pittsburgh (5), Pa. 

Creamer, Delbert Box 1412, Lumberport, W.Va. 

Creed, Julian 1208 S. Meadow St., Richmond, Va. 

Crockett, Peter 219 2nd St., California, Pa. 

Crossett, Richard 3607 Principio Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Culp, Glenn Harry 1017 Glenwood Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 

Cumming, David 1516 Steuben St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Curry, Robert Clinton 732 Todd Ave., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Dailey, Robert Engle 914 W. King St., Martinsburg, W.Va. 

Damrau, Edward Allan 1227 Milton Ave., Swissvale, Pa. 

Daniel, John 423 14th St., Huntington, W.Va. 

D'Antonio, Dominic Main St., Jefferson, Pa. 

Davis, Leland Eugene Jackson Center, Ohio 

Davis, Leroy Thomas 921 N. Market St., Frederick, Md. 

Davis, Lewis Edward Bergoo, W.Va. 

Davis, Walter 222 Worth St., Johnstown, Pa. 

Davisson, Russell 175 Valley St., Salem, W.Va. 

Day, Malcolm 123 61st St., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

DeVenzio, Charles 813 5th Ave., Coraopolis, Pa. 

Deringer, John 417 W. 9th Ave., Tarentum, Pa. 

Dils, James 1809 21st St., Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Donics, Frank 1524 W. North Ave., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Doolittle, Robert R.F.D. 2, Ready, W.Va. 

Dorsey, Daniel 3 Hobart St., Welch, W.Va 

Dorsey, William Clifton 18 7th St., S.E., Washington, D.C. 

Dorsey, William R 6243 Monitor St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dotson, James Milburn R.F.D. 2, Petroleum, W.Va. 

Drechsler, Joseph 108 S. Mount St., Baltimore, Md. 

Dreesen, William Box 263, New Alexandria, Pa. 

Dugan, Alfred 1 147 School St., Indiana, Pa. 

Duling, Walter 912 Pine Rd., Charleston, W.Va. 

Early, Anderson Highland Ave., Mullens, W. Va. 

Echols, Archie David 122 Arnold Ave., Lancaster, Ohio 

Eckendorf, John 496 Pine St., Meadville, Pa. 

Eicher, David 1077 Church St., Indiana, Pa. 

Ellis, Benjamin 3420 Elmley Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Ellis, Franklin Clay .8 Lincoln St., Buckhannon, W.Va. 

Ellis, Ray Gaston 1973 Harding Ave., Atladena, Calif. 

Ely, Thomas Great Hills Terr., Box 338, Short Hills, N.J. 

Eppley, Donald 113 Homestead Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 

Eskey, Chester 2241 Chapline St., Wheeling, W.Va. 



Bethany College Bulletin 159 

Evans, Grant Pattison 440 Kenmont Ave, Mt. Lebanon (16), Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Failinger, Walter 826 N. Main St., Washington, Pa. 

Farris, George 772 Schafer Rd., Hayward, Calif. 

Favero, Valentino Rt. 2, Box 61, New Kensington, Pa. 

Fedor, Edward 1225 Pine Way, Braddock, Pa. 

Figuly, Robert 1612 Huron Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Fisher, John Welton 826 Greenwood Ave., Wilmette, 111. 

Fisher, Robert 422 New York Ave., Rochester, Pa. 

Flagg, Duane 1026 N. Parrish St., Uhrichsville, Ohio 

Flaherty, John 3725 Orpwood St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Flanigin, Walter Box 163, Claremore, Okla. 

Fogie, Harry 518 Pitcairn St., Braddock, Pa. 

Foster, William 2727 5th Ave., Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Fowler, John J 4439 Market St., Williamstown, Pa. 

Fox, Donald William R.F.D. 2, Enon Valley, Pa. 

Foy, Charles 15 Division St., Crafton, Pa. 

Franz, Donald 241 S. High St., Morgantown, W.Va. 

Freas, Donald Verner 349 Oakland Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Freas, George L 349 Oakland Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Frey, Frederick 1913 Mt. Vernon Ave., Point Pleasant, W.Va. 

Friedman, Bernard $63$ Woodmont St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Friedman, Samuel 5402 Beacon St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Frondorf, Edwin 343 Erkenbrecher Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Fuller, Earl Carmichaels, Pa. 

Fulmer, John 41 1 River Ave., Toronto, Ohio 

Fultineer, Charles Main St., Glenville, W.Va. 

Fusco, Ralph 220 5th St., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Gabriel, David 3107 Custer St., Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Gaches, William Donald 3501 Campus St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Gage, Robert 3939 Chestnut St., New Orleans, La. 

Gaines, Donald Box 15, Indianola, Pa. 

Ganzlmar, Frank. 1239 6th Ave., Ford City, Pa. 

Garden, John Bridgeman Cherry Hill Rd., Warwood, W.Va. 

Gardner, Donald Elwood Reed, W.Va. 

Garnick, Joseph R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Gasser, William 273 Main St., Vintondale, Pa. 

Gault, William R.F.D. 1, Brownsville, Pa. 

Gee, John Ryan 963 Heslep Ave., Donora, Pa. 

George, William Twin Oaks Dr., R.F.D. 4, Millvale Branch, Pittsburgh (9), Pa. 

Gibbs, Clarence 326 E St., N.E., Washington, D.C. 

Gibson, Harold 2010 Heyward St., Columbia, S.C. 

Gilmer, John Elkton, Va. 

Glass, Park Roy 124 N. 2nd St., Connellsville, Pa. 

Glover, George Warren 1905 Market St., Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Glowacki, Zigmond 1140 Muldowney Ave., Lincoln Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Goldstein, Arthur 499 Fort Washington Ave., New York, N.Y. 

Golish, Joseph Matthew Box 263, Davis, W.Va. 

Gordon, Raymond 1325 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington (7), D.C. 



160 Bethany College Bulletin 

Gore, Harry 417 Linden Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 

Gould, Malcolm Brown 418 Shannon Rd., Los Gatos, Calif. 

Greengard, Paul 68-22 Dartmouth St., Forest Hills, N.Y. 

Gross, Robert 4233 248th St., Little Neck, N.Y. 

Groves, William T R.F.D. 1, Chicora, Pa. 

Haddle, Gillian 157 D St., Johnstown, Pa. 

Hall, Charles Everett 1310 West Virginia Ave., Dunbar, W.Va. 

Hall, John Henry 1310 West Virginia Ave., Dunbar, W.Va. 

Hall, LeRoy Dingledine 866 Center St., Versailles, Pa. 

Hamilton, William Merle 38 S. Lincoln St., Washington, Pa. 

Harlan, David 208 Edgewood Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Hart, Thomas 537 10th St., Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Hartley, Richard 1438 Hildreth Ave., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Hartmeyer, George 907 Franklin Ave., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Hatfield, Charles 529 Washington St., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Heckel, Roy 114 Bonvue St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Helm, Cyrus 209 Queen St., Kittanning, Pa. 

Henry, Leo 926 Jancey St., Pittsburgh (6), Pa. 

Hess, Robert Harold Ansted, W.Va. 

Himes, John William 80 Como St., Struthers, Ohio 

Hively, Robert Lee Rockdale Star Route, Spencer, W.Va. 

Hofer, Rudolph 390 Jayson Ave., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Hoff, Donald Kenneth 1599 E. 94th St., Cleveland, Ohio 

Hoffman, Eugene 126 Hartland Ave., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Hoffman, William * 353 Walnut St., Sharpsville, Pa. 

Holmes, Corey 118 Ridgewood Ave., Holly Hill, Fla. 

Holschuh, Howard New Hampton, N.Y. 

Holstein, William 422 Vine St., S.W., S. Charleston, W.Va. 

Holt, Robert Lee 81 S. Florida St., Buckhannon, W.Va. 

Horn, Howard 1115 Cornell St., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Horning, Vernon. 2383 13th St., Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Hosier, Harry John R.F.D. 1, W. Brownsville, Pa. 

Houk, Vernel Edward 2152 Walton Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Howie, Floyd James 817 Orchard St., Charleston, W.Va. 

Hrabovsky, Ernest 310 Duncan Way, Carnegie, Pa. 

Ingram, Wales ....*. R.F.D. 11, Richmond, Va. 

Irving, Daniel West Liberty, W.Va. 

Ivan, Joseph 30 Rudolph St., McKees Rocks, Pa. 

Jackson, Everett Box 375, New Martinsville, W.Va. 

Jahnke, William 2932 Glenmawr Ave., Sheraden, Pittsburgh (4), Pa. 

Jax, Jay Harry 112 Baxter St., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Jenkins, John 328 Beaver St., Zelienople, Pa. 

Jergel, Alvin 5412 Camelia St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John, Byron 1910 St. Mary's Ave., Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Johnson, Robert Edward 342 Van Buren St., Jamestown, N.Y. 

Jones, Clifton Clyde 3524 3rd Ave., Huntington, W.Va. 

Jones, Eugene Clark 741 Mulberry Ave., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Jones, John 184 River St., Madison, Ohio 



Bethany College Bulletin 161 

Jones, Victor Allen 741 Mulberry Ave., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Jones, Richard 416 Hawkins Ave., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jordan, Rex R.F.D. 3, Weston, W.Va. 

Joyce, John 5628 Bryant St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Kalafat, John George 235 River Ave., Weston, W.Va. 

Kartman, Arthur 318 Maryland Ave., N.E., Washington, D.C. 

Keene, Donald E 26 Beall St., Frostburg, Md. 

Keleman, Emery Box 13, Que Creek, Pa. 

Kelley, Arthur Wilson 1202 Woodward Ave., McKees Rocks, Pa. 

Kendall, Selva Clark 108 Gamble Ave., Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Kennelty, Harry R.F.D. 2, Oakford Hts., Jeannette, Pa. 

Kenny, Thomas Martin 312 Tunbridge Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Kerr, Joseph Chester 1670 Fawcett Ave., McKeesport, Pa. 

Kilgore, Robert 407 Euclid Ave., Erie, Pa. 

King, James Peter 118 Main St., Tidioute, Pa. 

Kirkpatrick, William 328 E. Pearl St., Butler, Pa. 

Kissinger, Donald W 2396 Almont St., Pittsburgh (10), Pa. 

Kittinger, Keith R.F.D. 2, Box 92, Salem, Va. 

Kloss, Lester 144 Strawbridge Ave., Sharon, Pa. 

Knapp, John 229 Morris St., Morgantown, W.Va. 

Knezevich, Anthony 613 Hemlock Way, Glassport, Pa. 

Knoche, Enno Henry 324 Jefferson Dr., Mt. Lebanon. Pa. 

Kobaly, Michael R.F.D. 1, Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Korby, Andrew R.F.D. 2, Lowellville, Ohio 

Kozokoff, Norman Jack 123 Upland Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 

Kraus, John R.F.D. 3, Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Krumpack, Rudolph 158 W. 1 8th St., Erie, Pa. 

Kuhn, Francis 2705 Latona Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Kuhn, Lewis 901 Washington Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

LaBarre, Robert 1800 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Lambert, Merlan Parsons, W.Va. 

Lamberto, Arthur 345 W. Piedmont St., Keyser, W.Va. 

Lasher, Marshall 940 N. Highland Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Latkins, Jack 6342 Douglas St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Latorre, Joseph 229 W. Saylor St., Atlas, Pa. 

Lavrinc, George 2684 Woodstock Ave., Swissvale, Pa. 

Lawson, William 319 Tuna St., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Lehman, Alfred 3 North Colonial Ave., Richmond, Va. 

Leland, Earl 6950 Frankstown Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Lemrow, Maynard 8 Bromleigh Rd., Stewart Manor, N.Y. 

Lescoe, Richard 20 Plough St., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Lewellen, William 42 Frank Ave., Union town, Pa. 

Lewis, William Bennett 340 Craft Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Link, Robert J 60 Hillcrest Lane, Uniontown, Pa. 

Lins, John Edward W. Lincoln Ave., McDonald, Pa. 

Lockyer, Paul ' 2052 86th Ave., Oakland, Calif. 

Logue, Arnold Charles 601 29th St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Logue, Clarence Archie 301 Washington St., Newell, W.Va. 



162 Bethany College Bulletin 

Logus, Anthony Charles 1837 Blake Blvd., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Lohr, Maurice Paden City, W.Va. 

Loncasty, Donald 35 Walnut St., E. Aurora, N.Y. 

Loufman, John Deimling Rd., Perrysville, Pa. 

Lovelace, Albert Paul E. D St., Brunswick, Md. 

Loveland, Nathan Box 926, Greybull, Wyo. 

Lukacs, John 530 Page St., Monessen, Pa. 

Lyon, Carl 324 W. Annsburg St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Madden, Frank 105 Jacksonia St., N.S., Pittsburgh (12), Pa. 

Magee, William 218 E. Falls St., New Castle, Pa. 

Magoto, Robert R.F.D. 1, Versailles, Ohio 

Mahoney, Robert 305 Myrtle St., Erie, Pa. 

Mangum, James no Walker St., Durham, N.C. 

Manning, Fred E. Main St., Hancock, Md. 

Mark, Edward Crucible, Pa. 

Marsh, Walter 60 Olive St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Marshall, Thomas 751 Snyder St., Morgantown, W.Va. 

Martin, Albert J 145 W. Swissvale Ave., Edgewood, Pa. 

Martin, Wandyl 1208 Red Oak St., Charleston, W.Va. 

Mason, Robert 512 Rossmore Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mastro, Joseph 540 Lowry Ave., Jeannette, Pa. 

Matto, Elmer Box 517, Star Junction, Pa. 

Mazza, Joseph 817 Woodsrun Ave., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mehalick, John Richard 3401 Terrace St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mellin, Gilbert 107 Washington Ave., Oakmont, Pa. 

Melocchi, Louis 275! Fleet St., Rankin, Pa. 

Merecky, Edward 422 Ringwood Ave., Pompton Lakes, N.J. 

Metheny, Richard 3123 Fifth Ave., Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Metrokotsas, Nicholas 718 South Ave., Plainfield, N.J. 

Miklas, Henry T 2303 Salisbury St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Miller, Eugene 1 140 W. Pratt Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Miller, John Gordon 2840 Memorial Dr., Sioux City, Iowa 

Miller, John Harold 805 Tomlinson Ave., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Miller, John Paul Oak Hill, W.Va. 

Miller, William 6825 Meade St., Pittsburgh (8), Pa. 

Mills, Howard 1234 Ninth St., Huntington, W.Va 

Milner, Orvis 1507 E. Magnolia Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. 

Minney, Orval 120 Kearsarge St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mocha, Joseph 234 S. Third St., St. Clair, Pa. 

Molinaro, John 7655 Baxter St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Monteleone, James R.F.D. 1, Box 47, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Moore, Floy J 1503 Fifth St., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Moore, William 7219 Race St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Morris, George 1223 44th Place, S.E., Washington, D.C. 

Morrison, Joseph 2807 Venable Ave., Charleston, W.Va. 

Mowry, William 185 Bryson Ave., Emsworth, Pa. 

Moyers, Emmet Norton, W.Va. 

Mundell, James 1616 Rhode Island Ave., Washington, D.C. 



Bethany College Bulletin 163 

Murphy, James 23305 Chadsey Dr., Euclid (17), Ohio 

Muryn, Stephen 408 Delaware St., Monessen, Pa. 

Myers, Edwin 235 Metz Ave., Akron, Ohio 

MacGillivray, Donald Harrison Ave., Newport, R.I. 

MacLean, Robert J 763 National Dr., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McAvoy, Russell Fayetteville, W.Va. 

McCann, Carl Verdunville, W.Va. 

McCarthy, Roger 226 Asotin Ave., Toppenish, Wash. 

McCaul, James 4118 Main St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McConnell, Robert Box 14, Pughtown, W.Va. 

McCorkle, Willard 735 Myrtle Rd., Charleston, W.Va. 

McCoy, Robert Franklin, W.Va. 

McCulloch, Edward 203 Brewster St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

McEvoy, Frank 903 Third Ave., E. McKeesport, Pa. 

McGrath, Charles 301 Kingsboro St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McLean, Thomas 570 E. Boston Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 

McMahon, Walter 342 Henry St., Crestline, Ohio 

McWhertor, Harold 256 McClure Ave., Sharon, Pa. 

Neale, Sterrett 1 125 Tenth St., Huntington, W.Va. 

Neuman, Louis 348 E. St., Salem, Ore. 

New, Noah Carroll 1640 Blvd. Dr., Atlanta, Ga. 

Newell, Dale 220 Second St., Mather, Pa. 

Newquist, Edward Lebanon, Ky. 

Nicely, Louis B Star Route E, Ligonier, Pa. 

Nickerson, Gerard 3945 Harrison St., Oakland, Calif. 

Nickles, Robert Heard 205 Bon Air Ave., Pittsburgh (10), Pa. 

Niswander, Guy Donald Coopers, W.Va. 

Oliver, Leonard 1230 New Hampshire Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 

Ondrechen, John Philip 2234 Main St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Orr, William Weldon Plan, McKeesport, Pa. 

Ostrowski, Arthur 323 Elm Rd., Ambridge, Pa. 

Ott, Reuben 68 St. Johns Ave., Kenmore, N.Y. 

Otto, Frederick Sharpsburg, Md. 

Owen, Donald R Gomanche Rd., Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 

Owen, Richard Edgar Girard, 111. 

Paine, Frederick 4317 Wells St., Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Palatka, Andrew Arthur 117 Glenn Ave., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Pandak, William 249.13th St., Conway, Pa. 

Panteloukas, Anthony Box 302, Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Parfitt, Joseph R.F.D. 1, Penn Run, Pa. 

Patterson, David 4503 Washington Blvd., Wilmington, Del. 

Patterson, William 788 E. Greene St., Waynesburg, Pa. 

Payne, Kenneth 517 Nancy St., Charleston, W.Va. 

Peabody, Robert 2433 25 Ave., Oakland, Calif. 

Pearcy, James Lowell 60 Pennsylvania Ave., Salem, W.Va. 

Pearson, Fred 2005 El Molino Ave., San Marino, Calif. 

Peat, James 383 Corrine St., Johnstown, Pa. 

Pertz, Elden Hobert 155 Pike St., Weston, W.Va. 



164 Bethany College Bulletin 

Perz, Charles 206 W. Main St., Staunton, 111. 

Pesa, Enrico 4209 Rush Blvd., Youngstown, Ohio 

Peschong, Richard Howard, S.D. 

Peters, George 2938 Glenmore Ave., Dormont, Pa. 

Peters, Raymond F Linn Rd., Brownsville, Pa. 

Peters, Robert 704 N. Second St., Apollo, Pa. 

Piasecki, Louis 728 S. Lakewood Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Pickens, John Monta 203 S. Broadway, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Pickens, Thomas R.F.D. 2, Box 336, Charleston, W.Va. 

Pitts, William Harrison R.F.D. 7, New Castle, Pa. 

Plazak, Cyril 1 136 Eighth Ave., Brackenridge, Pa. 

Plischke, Lemoyne 526 Sewickley St., Greensburg, Pa. 

Pochron, John 144 Green St., Adah, Pa. 

Poling, Glenn R.F.D. 3, Belington, W.Va. 

Pond, William 402 N. Sheppard St., Richmond, Va. 

Porterfield, Harold 412 Clark St., Bluefield, W.Va. 

Posa, Paul 220 S. Wade Ave., Washington, Pa. 

Potts, Gordon 17 Ark Ave., Mozart Hill, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Potts, Wayne 1217 Sixth St., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Powell, Jordan 1 176 Mulenburg Ave., Rutledge, Pa. 

Price, Robert Fairview Dr., Charleston, W.Va. 

Prince, Esel Winstead Benton, Ky. 

Pritchard, William C 373 Park Lane Dr., Galesburg, 111. 

Rader, Robert 608 Stanley Ave., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Randolph, Morris 668 Madison Ave., Meadville, Pa. 

Reardon, James 516 Meek St., Sharon, Pa. 

Reed, Andrew Joe Glenville, W.Va. 

Reed, James Frederick 113 Beverly St., Kingwood, W.Va. 

Reed, Robert Elliott Glenville, W.Va. 

Reeves, Robert Ross 96 Campbell Ave., Washington, Pa. 

Reeves, Thomas Charles 12 California Ave., Charleston, W.Va. 

Reiling, Gebhart 442 S. Dallas Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Resler, Edwin Louis 32 Wellington Dr., West View, Pa. 

Rhine, Luther 795 Kenmore Ave., Warren, Ohio 

Riedel, Robert 3541 Eoff St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Riggin, Donald 287 Coolspring St., Uniontown, Pa. 

Riggs, Richard Box 1 1 5, Paden City, W.Va. 

Riley, Harry Ellamore, W.Va. 

Rinetti, Edward 31-02 103 St., Corona, New York City, N.Y. 

Ripper, Elder Harvey Run Rd., Freedom, Pa. 

Rissler, Abner A 313 Second Ave., Charles Town, W.Va. 

Roberts, James R.F.D. 3, Washington, Pa. 

Robinson, Charles Wayland Winfield, W.Va. 

Robinson, Donald Myron 2835 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Robinson, Jennings 686 Fayette St., Cumberland, Md. 

Robinson, William B 232 Tremont St., Greensburg, Pa. 

Robson, Harry . : 1248 Elf St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rocereto, Vincent 819 23 St., Beaver Falls, Pa. 



Bethany College Bulletin 165 

Rockwell, Chester S 1220 Valley Ave., Winchester, Va. 

Rosebaugh, Howard R.F.D. 1, Mars, Pa. 

Rowand, Alpha 2010 Commerce St., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Ruckman, John West Liberty, W.Va. 

Ruggiero, John 301 1 W. Federal St., Youngstown, Ohio 

Rumbaugh, Robert 35 W. Campbell St., Blairsville, Pa. 

Rutherford, Frank 234 Tazewell Park, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Ryan, Charles Edgar 710 Market St., Spencer, W.Va. 

Sable, Daniel 5562 Hobart St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Salvadore, Joseph Marianna, Pa. 

Samuels, William 202 Fairmont Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Sanders, Morris 561 Second St., Pitcairn, Pa. 

Santoro, Richard 737 Lemington St., Qreensburg, Pa. 

Satterfield, Eugene 201 Reeves Ave., Fairmont, W.Va. 

Sawyer, James Fourth & Market Sts., Darlington, Pa. 

Schaffer, Donald 319 W. 40th St., Shadyside, Ohio 

Scheuer, Alfred 440 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie, Pa. 

Schlosser, Jack 602 College Ave., Beaver, Pa. 

Schmalzried, Charles J 1201 Peermont Ave., Dormont (16), Pa. 

Schmertzler, Emory 61 5 N. Randolph, Elkins, W.Va. 

Schoener, Walter 44 Estella St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Schrecongost, John 655 Shad Dr. E., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Schreiber, Richard 314 Velsack Rd., Glenshaw, Pa. 

Schrier, Arnold 41 14 29th St., Mt. Rainier, Md. 

Schroth, William 102 Kittanning Pike, Pittsburgh (15), Pa. 

Schubert, Richard 709 Welty St., Greensburg, Pa. 

Scoggins, Charles 9723 Wise Ave., Dundalk, Md. 

Scolieri, Michael 786 Fairston St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Selekman, Milton 5810 Bryant St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Selvey, Charles B Fayetteville, W.Va. 

Selvig, Walter 2343 Birtley Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Severson, Jack 2374 SW 18th St., Miami, Fla. 

Shaffer, James Thoburn Addition, Monongah, W.Va. 

Sharer, Clyde James 1724 Verner Ave., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Shaw, Robert R.F.D. 1, Springboro, Pa. 

Shepard, Alfred 210 Pennsylvania Ave., Charleston, W.Va. 

Short, Leo 3103 Ashlyn St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sieber, Robert Joseph Buckham Court, R.F.D. 4, Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Siebert, Andrew 321 Milroy St., N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Siegel, Albert 3910 Garrison Blvd., Baltimore, Md. 

Sigler, George Box 1 172, Pennsboro, W.V. 

Silber, William R.F.D. 5, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Simpson, Robert LaMark Good St., Roscoe, Pa. 

Simpson, Robert William Grand Ave., Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Sittig, Raymond 134 W. LaClede Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 

Slabey, Theodore 317 S. Tenth St., Philadelphia (7), Pa. 

Slovik, Florian R.F.D. 3, Box 42, McDonald, Pa. 

Smith, Homer Alma, W.Va. 



166 Bethany College Bulletin 

Smith, Ralph Bond New Vienna, Ohio 

Smith, Robert Henval 430 Holden Ave., Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Smith, Wallace Elliott 800 Tomlinson Ave., Glen Dale, W.Va. 

Smith, William 914 Viand St., Point Pleasant, W.Va. 

Snyder, William R.F.D. 3, Box 236, Meyersdale, Pa. 

Somerville, Jordon 520 Branch St., Charleston, W.Va. 

Spearnak, Michael 1505 Wesley St., McKeesport, Pa. 

Spino, Pascal 408 Wood St., Greensburg, Pa. 

Spurlock, William N. Kenova, Ohio 

Staab, Gerald 29 Rhodes Ave., Pittsburgh (20), Pa. 

Stephens, William 1440 Cornell Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Stettler, John E 1721 Irwin St., Aliquippa, Pa. 

Stewart, Charles 266 First St. W., Ceredo, W.Va. 

Stewart, Guy Harry 115 W. Piedmont St., Keyser, W.Va. 

Stewart, John Gordon 221 Parkway Dr., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Stiles, Raymond 504 Peebles St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stitt, Leonard 1246 Denisonview St., Pittsburgh (5), Pa. 

Stoll, Robert Franklin 307 Lafayette Ave., Niles, Ohio 

Stoltz, David 2530 Eighth Ave., Altoona, Pa. 

Stoup, William 278 W. Green St., Waynesburg, Pa. 

Sudac, David 2302 Manor Ave., Swissvale, Pa. 

Swain, J. Robert 1605 Laurel Ave., Knoxville, Tenn. 

Swart, Charles Leatherwood Lane, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Swartz, Charles 264 Le Moyne Ave., Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 

Swinston, Robert 1335 Mordock Rd., Pittsburgh (17), Pa. 

Swisher, Forest Gene 108 James St., West Union, W.Va. 

Swisher, Kyle Young Fairview, W.Va. 

Swope, Burbridge Oak Hill, W.Va. 

Tachovsky, Hilary 508 Eighth Ave., New Brighton, Pa. 

Tallarico, Seirfine 72 Weirich Ave., Washington, Pa. 

Tanner, Earl Martin R.F.D. 1, Washington, Pa. 

Teapole, Donald Lee R.F.D. 1, Geneva Hill, Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Terry, Charles 508 Old York Rd., Abington, Pa. 

Thomas, Clyde Dana Clendenin, W.Va. 

Thomas, William John 139 Fifth Ave., Sharon, Pa. 

Thompson, Conrad Patterson St., White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. 

Thompson, David 3645 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh (14), Pa. 

Thompson, Kenneth 1250 River Rd., Beaver, Pa. 

Tinstman, William 423 Martin Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Tkach, Paul 265 McClure Ave., Sharon, Pa. 

Toprani, Carl 424 Fourth St., Donora, Pa. 

Tornabene, Charles North St., McDonald, Pa. 

Trabits, James Railroad Ave., Avonmore, Pa. 

Trafton, Alfred Holmes, N.Y. 

Trench, James 33 Linden St., Uniontown, Pa. 

Trent, Willis Gilbert, W.Va. 

Troutman, Philip Box 413, Sherman Ave., Waynesburg, Pa. 

Truslow, Thomas Fifth Ave., Box 483, Montgomery, W.Va. 



Bethany College Bulletin 167 

Tucker, Ancil West Union, W.Va. 

Tucker, John 464 Brockway Ave., Morgantown, W.Va. 

Turley, Murhl 812 Breezemont Dr., Charleston, W.Va. 

Tunrer, Berkely 189 Royal Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Turner, Talmadge Santa Anna, Tex. 

Turney, Andrew 860 Fourth Ave., New Kensington, Pa. 

Underwood, James 446 Hawley Rd., Richmond, Ky. 

Unfried, Hubert Enfield, 111. 

Unterzuber, Gene R.F.D. 2, Moundsville, W.Va. 

Van Camp, Charles 3349 Franklin St., Bellaire, Ohio 

Van Gilder, Samuel Owings, W.Va. 

Van Tol, Peter Shepherdstown, W.Va. 

Varrati, Anthony 503 Summit Ave., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Vaughan, Allan 3601 Bradley Rd., Huntington, W.Va. 

Vickers, George 314 Sixth Ave., Montgomery, W.Va. 

Volchko, John Rices Landing, Pa. 

Voltz, James 117 Olive Ave., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Wagoner, Charles Star Route, Weston, W.Va. 

Walker, Calvin Brooks 616 Eastlawn Ave., Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Walker, Clarence 1007 N. Fort Harrison Ave., Clearwater, Fla. 

Walsh, James 3309 Terrace St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Walters, John 275 N. Craig St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ward, Kent 127 Winston Rd., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Warren, John 1431 Edwards St., Huntington, W.Va. 

Wasko, Andrew Box 413, Fredericktown, Pa. 

Waterman, Arthur 132 W. 22nd St., Erie, Pa. 

Watkins, Robert 5617 Elgin Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Watson, Ray Howard 208 E. Third St., Weston, W.Va. 

Watts, Thomas 11 College St., Poland, Ohio 

Weaver, Donald Elton, Pa. 

Weeter, Tommy 927 N. McKean St., Kittanning, Pa. 

Wheeler, John 113 Mary St., Johnsonburg, Pa. 

White, Robert 206 Main St., Reynoldsville, Pa. 

White, William Asa Madison, W.Va. 

Whitelock, Edward 17*95 Northlawn, Detroit, Mich. 

Whiting, Charles Glenville, W.Va. 

Wick, Earl 1195 Arch St., Washington, Pa. 

Willett, Bernard R.F.D. 1, Box 287, Tampa (4), Fla. 

Williams, James R 2862 Castlegate Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Williams, James Stanley 1705 nth St., N.E., Massillon, Ohio 

Williams, Norman 129 Roup St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Williams, Richard Loy 414 E. Cherry St., Clearfield, Pa. 

Willis, William Linden Ave., Moundsville, W.Va. 

Wills, Lawrence Box 125, Alloy, W.Va. 

Wilson, Charles V 2201 University Ave., Morgantown, W.Va. 

Wilson, John Dean 789 Second St., Beaver, Pa. 

Wilson, Joseph Chasey 2651 Guyan Ave., Huntington, W.Va. 

Wilson, Joseph 1 10419 Forbes Rd., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 






168 Bethany College Bulletin 

Wise, Norman Glen . Chappell, Neb. 

Witt, Cornelius Harold 200 Garfield Branch, Long Branch, L.I., N.Y. 

Wojcik, George 305 Bow St., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Wolfe, Joseph 519E. Winter Ave., New Castle, Pa. 

Wollam, Raymond Box 24, Ardara, Pa. 

Workman, Richard Clendenin, W.Va. 

Wright, Henderson 5206 Norwood Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Wrobleski, Victor 428 Second St., Braddock, Pa. 

Yaussy, Paul 1092 Neville St., Follansbee, W.Va. 

Yossa, Albert 265 S. Cliff St., Butler, Pa. 

Young, Phillip 721 Baldwin St., Meadville, Pa. 

Yount, Marlin R.F.D. 4, Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Zilka, John Box 229, Bentleyville, Pa. 



Summary of Students i 943-1 944 

Summer Semester 1943 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 13 20 23 

Juniors 15 27 42 

Sophomores 10 40 50 

Freshmen 23 43 66 

Unclassified Specials o 1 1 

Totals 61 131 192 

Navy V-12 Students 331 

Total Enrollment 523 

Winter Semester 1943-194.4 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 5 31 36 

Juniors 12 16 38 

Sophomores 7 61 69 

Freshmen 19 72 91 

Unclassified Specials 1 2 3 

Totals 44 193 237 

Navy V-12 Students 310 

Total Enrollment 547 

Spring Summer 1944 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 11 29 40 

Juniors 6 39 45 



Bethany College Bulletin 169 

Sophomores 1 1 43 54 

Freshmen 12 49 61 

Unclassified Specials o 4 4 

Totals 40 164 204 

Navy V-12 Students 313 

Total Enrollment 517 



For the College Year 1943-1944 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 34 50 74 

Juniors 10 41 51 

Sophomores 14 59 73 

Freshmen 23 61 84 

Unclassified Specials 1 4 5 

Totals 72 215 287 

Navy V-12 Students 570 

Total Enrollment 857 

The enrollment figures for the college year do not agree with those of individual semesters 
because of the reclassification of students. 



Enrollment by States and Foreign Countries 

1 943-1 944 

Civilian Students 

Arkansas v 1 

Connecticut 2 

Costa Rica 1 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Georgia 2 

Illinois 1 

Massachusetts 1 

Michigan 3 

New Jersey 11 

New York 56 

Ohio 44 

Pennsylvania 95 

Peru 1 

West Virginia 67 

Total 287 



170 Bethany College Bulletin 

Navy V-12 

California 9 

Connecticut 1 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 10 

Florida 5 

Georgia 1 

Illinois 6 

Iowa 1 

Kentucky 5 

Louisiana 1 

Maryland 16 

Michigan 1 

Nebraska 1 

New Jersey 3 

New York 19 

North Carolina 1 

Ohio 36 

Oklahoma 1 

Oregon 1 

Pennsylvania 275 

Rhode Island 1 

South Carolina 1 

South Dakota 1 

Tennessee 3 

Texas 1 

Virginia 9 

Washington 1 

West Virginia 1 56 

Wyoming 1 

Total 570 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF BETHANY COLLEGE 

The Alumni Association of Bethany College had its origin in 1846, six years after the 
founding of the college, when the members of the first three graduating classes met during 
the commencement season and organized the "Society of the Alumni of Bethany College." 
The constitution, drawn up and adopted at that time, remains as one of the interesting 
historical documents of the college. In later years there was no continuous and active alumni 
program. 

Alumni records and activities are now under the direction of Mr. George C. Hettler, who 
is the Executive Secretary. In the determination of policies and program the leadership is 
taken by the Alumni Advisory Council of Bethany College. This council is composed of the 
officers of the alumni association and representatives from the geographical districts. The 
alumni office at the college preserves records concerning the activities of alumni, publishes 
throughout the year several alumni issues of the Bethany College Bulletin, assists in the pro- 
grams of branch associations, and seeks, in various ways to promote alumni activity and 
interest. All graduates and former students automatically become members of the associa- 
tion when they leave the campus. The association is affiliated with the American Council. 

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President R. D. Hurl, Shelby, Ohio 

Vice President Francis J. Love, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Secretary George C. Hettler, Bethany, W.Va. 

President of the Alumni Advisory Council R. D. Hurl, Shelby, Ohio 



INDEX 



Page 

Academic Information 138 

Academic Recognition 3 

Accounts, Payment of ' . 23 

Activities, Student 135 

Administration, Officers 8 

Administration Staff 15 

Admissions and Induction 22 

Advanced Standing 23 

Advanced Standing by Achievement 

Tests 24 

Freshman Admission 22 

General Requirements 22 

Method of Enrollment 26 

Orientation Program and Registra- 
tion 25 

Placement Tests for Freshmen 25 

Pre-College Guidance 26 

Reservation of Dormitory Rooms ... 26 

Special Students 24 

Advanced Standing 23 

Advanced Enrollment 142 

Alumni Association 171 

Art Appreciation 122 

Bequests, Forms for 175 

Bible 116 

Biology 103 

Board 30 

Board of Trustees 6 

Buildings and Grounds 123 

Business Administration 91 

Calendar, College 5 

Chemistry 106 

Classification of Students 138 

Comprehensive Examination 49 

Concerts 133 

Contents, Table of 2 

Convocation 133 

Degrees 

Conferred October 1943 147 

Conferred February 1944 148 

Conferred June 1944 149 

Requirements for 42 



Page 

Departments of Instruction 66 

Art Appreciation 122 

Bible 116 

Biology 103 

Business Administration 91 

Chemistry 106 

Church History 118 

Economics 91 

Education 79 

English 71 

French 76 

Geography 108 

Geology 108 

German 77 

Greek 69 

History, American 96 

History, European 94 

History, Naval 96 

Homiletics 118 

Journalism 75 

Latin 70 

Library Science 97 

Mathematics no 

Music 119 

Naval Organization 68 

Orientation 68 

Personnel Administration 82 

Philosophy 118 

Physical Education 85 

Physics 114 

Political Science 97 

Psychology 83 

Secretarial Training 98 

Social Science 91 

Sociology 100 

Spanish 78 

Speech and Dramatics 74 

Dramatics 74 

Economics 91 

Education 79 

Educational Program 47 

Comprehensive Examination 49 

Instruction 47 

Lower Division 48 



Page 

Student Guidance 50 

Upper Division 49 

Endowments 130 

English 71 

Enrollment 

Method of 26 

Summary of 168 

Equipment and Resources 123 

Buildings and Grounds 123 

Endowments 130 

Instructional Equipment 128 

Libraries 126 

Location 123 

Special Funds 131 

Examinations 

Comprehensive 49 

Special 142 

Expenses 28 

Board 30 

Breakage and Guarantee Deposits. . 32 

Fees 28 

Payment of Accounts 33 

Room Rent 29 

Tuition 28 

Faculty of Instruction 9 

Functional Committees of 17 

Fees 28 

Financial Aids 39 

Fraternities 137 

French 76 

Freshman Days 25 

Funds, Special 131 

General Information 133 

Academic Information 138 

Lectures and Concerts 133 

Music and Dramatics 138 

Religious Life 133 

Social Regulations 145 

Special Days 134 

Student Activities 135 

Student Health 143 

Geography 108 

Geology 108 

German 77 

Grading System 139 

Graduation and Honors 42 



Page 

Degree Requirements 42 

Honors 44 

Greek 69 

History 94 

History and Purpose 18 

Homiletics 118 

Honors 44 

Instructional Equipment 128 

Instruction, Departments of 66 

Journalism 75 

Laboratories 128 

Latin 70 

Lectures and Concerts 133 

Libraries 126 

Library Science 97 

Library Staff 15 

Location 123 

Lower Division Courses 48 

Mathematics no 

Music 119 

Music and Dramatics 138 

Navy Staff 14 

Occupational Preparation 52 

Business Administration 59 

Business Training for Women 59 

Christian Ministry 61 

Dentistry 61 

Education — Training of Teachers. . 62 

Engineering 61 

Graduate Study 64 

Guidance and Counselling 62 

Journalism 62 

Law 60 

Librarianship 64 

Medical Technology 61 

Medicine 60 

Navy V-12 $3 

Nursing 61 

Personnel Administration 60 

Physical Education and Recreation. . 64 

Professional Chemistry 61 

Public School Music 64 



Page 

Public Service 60 

Secretarial Training 59 

Social Work 59 

Special Programs 59 

Officers of Administration 8 

Orientation 68 

Payment of Accounts 33 

Philosophy 118 

Physical Education 85 

Physics 1 14 

Placement 41 

Political Science 97 

Pre-College Guidance 26 

Probation 140 

Provisional Enrollment 140 

Psychology 83 

Purpose and History 18 

Registration, Orientation Program and . 25 

Religious Life 133 

Requirements 

For Admission 19 

For Degrees 42 

Residence Halls 29 

Residents of College Dormitories 16 

Room Rent 29 

Room Reservations 26 

Roster of Students 150 



Page 

Scholarships and Financial Aids 35 

Financial Aids 39 

Freshman Scholarships 3$ 

Scholarships for Upperclassmen 36 

Secretarial Training 98 

Social Regulations 145 

Social Science 91 

Sociology 100 

Spanish 78 

Special Days 134 

Special Examinations 142 

Special Fees 32 

Special Students 24 

Speech and Dramatics 74 

Student Activities 135 

Student Guidance 47 

Student Health 143 

Student Roster 150 

Summary of Students 168 

Transcripts 142 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Committees 7 

Officers 7 

Tuition 28 

Upper Division Courses 49 

Withdrawal 141 



BEQUESTS 

Gifts to the college may take the form of lectureships, of scholarships, of professorships, 
of additions to the material equipment, or of contributions to the permanent eadowment 
fund or the current expense fund of the college. Special conditions may, of course, be 
attached to any gift. Forms of bequests are suggested as follows: 

A. UNRESTRICTED BEQUEST 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation 
established by law at Bethany in the Commonwealth of West Virginia, the sum of 

dollars, to be applied to the general uses and purposes of the said 

institution. 

B. UNRESTRICTED BEQUEST MAKING THE COLLEGE 
RESIDUARY LEGATEE 

All the rest, residue, and remainder of my estate, real and personal, I devise and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation established by law at Bethany in the 
Commonwealth of West Virginia, to be applied to the general uses and purposes of the 
said institution. 

C. BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation 
established by law at Bethany in the Commonwealth of West Virginia, the sum of 

dollars to be invested and preserved inviolably for the endowment of 

Bethany College. 





ctkanu ^-Meac 



in 



West Virginia 



"Our purpose To 

provide higher education 
in an atmosphere sympa- 
thetic to Christian ideals 
and Christian faith and 
to conserve and develop 
the moral character and 
religious life of its stu- 
dents." 



PRESIDENT WILBUR H. CRAMBLET 



B 



ETHANY COLLEGE WAS founded in 1840 by Alexander Campbell 
and chartered by the State of Virginia. It is a small co-educational 
college of the liberal arts and sciences, privately controlled by a self 
perpetuating board of trustees. The college is accredited by all regional 
and national agencies. 




DEAN OF THE 

FACULTY 
B. R. WEIMER 



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OGLE BAY GATES 



From the beginning of his college 
career each student has an individual 
faculty counselor who is concerned 
with his total adjustment and develop- 
ment. The counselor and student have 
the help of specialists on the college 
staff whose services are always avail- 
able. When the student selects his 
major field of study, a member of the 
staff in that department, usually the 
department head, is appointed as the 
student's counselor to direct his 
academic program. A modern and 
adequate program of educational and 
aptitude testing is provided. 

DEAN OF STUDENTS 
F. H. KIRKPATRICK 




COMMENCEMENT HALL AND MAIN BUILDING 



Commencement Hall, the Main Building, and Oglebay Hall stand 
together as one unit but ore separate in construction. All are of Col- 
legiate Gothic architecture. Commencement Hall houses the auditor- 
ium and the Department of Music. The Main Building contains class- 
rooms, seminar rooms, and laboratories for physics and psychology. 




AN EXPERIMENT 
WITH ELECTRONICS 
EQUIPMENT 



A CLASS 

IN CLINICAL 
METHODS 




The laboratories and lecture rooms for chemistry and biology are 
located in Oglebay Hall. 

The general apparatus in science reflects the completeness of the 
facilities available throughout the college. One faculty member to 12 
students makes possible individualization in instructional methods and 
program. 



OGLEBAY HALL 



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COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 




A CLASS IN ENGINEERING DRAWING 




ORGANIC 

CHEMISTR 




A CLASS IN ENGINEERING DRAWING 




ORGANIC 
C H EM I ST R 



REFERENCE 
DESK 




CARNEGIE LIBRARY 




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- 




COCHRAN HALL FOR MEN 




There are four national so- 
rorities for women and five 
national fraternities for men. 




_ I PS HALL 



SIGMA NU HOUSE 




GATEWAY HALL 



The men's fraternity houses are being operated temporarily by the 
college as residence halls for women. 



BETHANY HOUSE — STUDENT CENTER AND DINING HALL 









THE BETHANY MEMORIAL CHURCH 




THE CHOIR ON 

THE CORRIDOR 



■ ■ ■ 



ACROSS 

THE CAMPUS 





EXPERIMENTAL 
PSYCHOLOGY 



A SEMINAR 

IN ENGLISH 

LITERATURE 




BETHESPIANS PRESENT "THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER" 



** i* 



THE NAVY 

BAND 





"PASS 
I N 
REVIEW" 







A CLASS IN SPEECH 






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THE BISON IN ACTION ON RINE FIELD 



A 



COMPREHENSIVE sports program provides every student with 
an opportunity to participate in some form of athletic recreation. Rine 
Fields and the Irvin Gymnasium offer a varied program throughout 
the year. Swimming, football, tennis, cross-country, basketball, hockey, 
boxing, archery, volleyball, socker, handball, track, and baseball are 
among the sports available at Bethany. The all-weather court and miles 
of wooded nature trails are further centers of recreation. 





FIVE FIRSTS IN CROSS-COU NTR\ 




A COMPLETE PROGRAM OF SPORTS FOR ALL 



THE I R V I N 

GYMNASIUM 




THE VICTORY MARCH 






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Preliminary Application for Freshman Class 

To secure priority in registration I hereby make application for admission to Bethany 
College for (month) , (year) 

I understand that actual acceptance to Bethany College depends upon my graduation 
from an accredited high school or preparatory school and upon my class rank being in 
the upper half. 

As soon as possible I shall fill out and file the complete application for admission. With 
this blank I am sending the required admission fee of $10.00. 

The application fee of $10.00 is refundable if the applicant is not accepted by the college. 
If the applicant is accepted, and then cancels his application ninety days prior to the open- 
ing of the semester in which he wishes to register and so notifies the Director of Admissions, 
$7.00 of the application fee will be refunded. If cancellation occurs after the above specified 
period, no part of the application fee will be refunded. 

(Signed) 

Mr. or Miss 

(Address) 

Church membership or preference 

Nationality Race 

Age Condition of health 

Preparatory or high school attended 

Date of graduation 

Headmaster or principal 

Address of school 



Send this blank to: 



Mr. C. C. Barlow 
Director of Admissions 
Bethany College 
Bethany, W.Va. 





ttltetia 




.U-.J * 

2£EIHfflW • WEST VIBalklk 




IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT 

This issue of the Bethany College Catalogue is being published in strict con- 
formity with government regulations regarding the saving of paper. In order to 
hold the issue within the quota allowed the college for this purpose, certain sec- 
tions usually included in the catalogue have been greatly abbreviated or entirely 
omitted from this edition. Reference is hereby made to the 1944-45 Catalogue 
Number of the Bethany College Bulletin for complete statements about the 
history of the college, academic program, occupational preparation, special 
programs, equipment and resources and other items. Unless changed by specific 
statements in this present edition, statements and regulations of the 1944-45 
edition are in full force and effect. 

This catalogue lists the offerings of the college during the period from July 1 , 
1945 to June 30, 1946. While not all courses listed will be offered in any semester, 
the col'ege will undertake to offer those courses for which there is adequate 
student demand and need. 

The college is planning to operate a regular program of two semesters for 
civilian students. The academic year will begin September aoth and continue 
as scheduled in the college calendar. For the convenience of those who wish to 
follow an accelerated program of study the college will operate an eight-weeks 
summer term beginning July a, 1945. 

Beginning July 1, 1945, the Navy will occupy Cochran and Helwig Halls. This 
will make it possible for Phillips Hall to be occupied by women students at the 
beginning of the fall semester in September, 1945. The college will also operate 
the Gateway Hall and other residence halls for women during the coming year. 

Students may enroll on July 2 for either the eight weeks summer term or for 
the full semester taking courses in the prescribed curricula for the Navy V-12 
students. 

The college is planning a complete program for the training of veterans and 
others whose educational training has been interrupted, and will undertake to 
organize its offerings so as to meet the individual needs of its students. Special 
counselling, advisory and guidance services will be part of the opportunities 
available to all students. In this connection, we call attention to the completion 
of arrangements whereby the college is to serve as an advisory and guidance 
center for the Veterans Administration working under the direction of the 
Pittsburgh office. 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Vol. XXXVIII March, 1945 No. 3 

Entered as second class matter at Bethany Post Office, Bethany, W.Va. 



Published every month except July and August by Bethany College, Bethany, W.Va. 



CATALOGUE 

i 9 4 5 - i 9 4 6 



Statement 

of 

History, Purpose, and Program 

at 

Bethany College 
Bethany, West Virginia 

with 

Curricular Announcements 

for 

i 945-1 946 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The information contained in this catalogue is presented with 
the understanding that courses, teaching personnel, require- 
ments, schedules of opening and closing of sessions, holidays, 
expenses, etc., will be subject to whatever revisions the pres- 
ent war emergency and post war problems may make neces- 
sary or appropriate. 



CONTENTS 

Special Announcement Inside of front cover 

Academic Recognition 3 

Calendar 4 

Board of Trustees 5 

Officers of Administration 7 

Faculty of Instruction 8 

Purpose and History 15 

Admission and Induction 17 

Expenses 22 

Scholarships and Financial Aids 28 

Graduation and Honors 34 

Educational Program 39 

Occupational Preparation 42 

Departments of Instruction 45 

Equipment and Resources 98 

General Information 102 

Degrees Conferred 1 14 

Roster of Students 116 

Alumni Association of Bethany College 132 

Index 133 



ACADEMIC RECOGNITION 

Bethany College is on the approved list of colleges of the 
Association of American Universities. By virtue of this ap- 
proval the baccalaureate degree from Bethany College is 
recognized for admission to graduate study in this coun- 
try and abroad. 

Bethany College is accredited by the North Central As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools as a degree 
granting institution. 

Bethany College is a member in good standing of the 
Association of American Colleges and the American Coun- 
cil on Education. 

Bethany College is recognized by various state depart- 
ments of education as an institution for the training of 
teachers, and is in good standing with the American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors. 

Women graduates of Bethany College are eligible to 
membership in the American Association of University 
Women. Membership in the American Association carries 
with it membership in the International Federation of Uni- 
versity Women. 

Bethany College is a member of the Board of Higher 
Education of Disciples of Christ. 

Bethany College is also a member of the Association of 
Church Related Colleges of West Virginia and of the Asso- 
ciation of Liberal Arts Colleges of Western Pennsylvania. 



CALENDAR 

Spring Semester 
1945 

March 1, Thursday — Registration for Spring Semester 

March 2, Friday — Classes begin 

April 27, Friday — Mid-semester grade reports 

May 30, Wednesday — Senior reading period begins 

June 11 to 13, Monday to Wednesday — Senior Comprehensive Examinations 

June 17, Sunday — Annual Commencement 

June 18 to 21, Monday to Thursday — Final examinations 

Summer Semester for Navy V-12 Students 

(And others who elect the V-12 Curricula) 

July 2-3, Monday and Tuesday — Freshman Days 

July 3, Tuesday — Registration for Summer Semester 

July 3, Tuesday — Classes begin 

August 24, Friday — Mid-semester grade reports 

September 28, Friday — Reading period for seniors begins 

October 9-1 1, Tuesday to Thursday — Senior Comprehensive Examinations 

October 14, Sunday — Graduation exercises 

October 17-20, Wednesday to Saturday — Final examinations 

Summer Term 

July 2-3, Monday and Tuesday — Freshman Days 

July 3, Tuesday — Registration for Summer Term 

July 3, Tuesday — Classes begin 

August 24-25, Friday and Saturday — Final examinations for Summer Term 

Fall Semester 

September 17, 18, 19, Monday to Wednesday — Freshman Days 
September 20, Thursday — Registration for all students 
September 21, Friday — 8:00 a.m., Classes begin 
November 16, Friday — Mid-semester grade reports 
December 20, Thursday — 4:00 p.m. Christmas recess begins 

I946 

January 2, Wednesday — 8:00 a.m. Christmass recess ends. 

Tanuary 10, Thursday — 4:00 p.m. Reading period for seniors begins 

January 22-23, Tuesday and Wednesday — Senior Comprehensive Examinations 

January 23-26, Wednesday to Saturday — Final Examinations 

January 27, Sunday — Graduation exercises 

Spring Semester 

January 30, 31, Wednesday and Thursday — Freshman Days 
January 31, Thursday — Registration for Spring Semester 
February 1, Friday — 8:00 a.m. Classes begin 



March 29, Friday— Mid-semester grade reports 

April 17, Wednesday— 4:00 p.m. Easter recess begins 

April 24, Wednesday — 8:00 a.m. Easter recess ends 

May 16, Thursday — 4:00 p.m. Senior Reading period begins 

May 28-30, Tuesday to Thursday — Senior Comprehensive Examinations 



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1945 



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DESK 
CALENDAR 



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stark cflbenDflRS. inc. 

Chicago 
Made in U. S. A. 



ember 1st, schedule for the same 
> semester basis with the summer 



'EES 

1947 

1.3 Main Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

' Shelby, Ohio 

Box D, San Clemente, California 

Wellsburg, W.Va. 

>o Lincoln Blvd., Kenmore, N.Y. 

Euclid Ave., E. Cleveland, Ohio 
Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

. . Box 765, East Liverpool, Ohio 

1946 

University City, Mo. 

Shelby, Ohio 

and Trust Bldg., Uniontown, Pa. 

Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Hand Drive, Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 
Wheeling Clinic, Wheeling, W.Va. 
s & Trust Co., Steubenville, Ohio 
Allison Avenue, Washington, Pa. 
DeHart Street, Morristown, NJ. 

1945 

Butler, Pa. 

lian Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 
lat'l Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
n Trust Bldg., Washington, D.C. 

Shelby,Ohio 

enneth Avenue, Greensburg, Pa. 
bf Trade Bldg., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Steel Company, Weirton, W.Va. 



Faculty Representative for 1944-1945: John J. Knight 



CALENDAR 



Spring Semester 
1945 

March 1, Thursday — Registration for Sorins Semester 

March 2, Friday — Classes begin 

April 27, Friday — Mid-semester £ 

May 30, Wednesday — Senior rea( 

June 11 to 13, Monday to Wedne 

June 17, Sunday — Annual Comm 

June 18 to 21, Monday to Thursc 



Summer Seme* 

(And othe 

July 2-3, Monday and Tuesday- 
July 3, Tuesday — Registration fo 
July 3, Tuesday — Classes begin 
August 24, Friday — Mid-semestei 
September 28, Friday — Reading ] 
October 9-1 1, Tuesday to Thursd 
October 14, Sunday — Graduation 
October 17-20, Wednesday to Sal 



July 2-3, Monday and Tuesday- 
July 3, Tuesday — Registration foi 
July 3, Tuesday — Classes begin 
August 24-25, Friday and Saturd 



September 17, 18, 19, Monday to 
September 20, Thursday — Registi 
September 21, Friday — 8:00 a.m., 
November 16, Friday — Mid-seme: 
December 20, Thursday — 4:00 p.i 

I946 

January 2, Wednesday — 8:00 a.m 
Tanuary 10, Thursday — 4:00 p.m. 
January 22-23, Tuesday and Wed 
January 23-26, Wednesday to Sat 
January 27, Sunday — Graduation 

January 30, 31, Wednesday and T 
January 31, Thursday— Registrati 
February 1, Friday — 8:00 a.m. Classes begin 



CALENDAR FOR L945 



JANUARY 


JULY 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


.. 1 

7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


2 3 4 

9 10 11 
16 17 18 
23 24 25 
30 31 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


1 

8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 4 5 
10 11 12 
17 18 19 
24 25 26 
31 


6 1 
13, <A 
20 21 
27 28 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


4 6 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


«., .. 1 
6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 

27 28 . . 


2 

9 

16 
23 


3 

10 
17 
24 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


. . 1 2 
7 8 9 
14 15 16 
21 22 23 
28 29 30 


3 4 

10 11 
17 18 
24 25 
31 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 






2 

9 

16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 




4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 5 6 
11 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 

7 

14 
21 
28 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


1 2 
8 9 
15 16 
22 23 
29 30 


3 4 5 
10 11 12 
17 18 19 
24 25 26 


6 

13 

20 
27 


7 

14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 
22 
29 


2 3 4 

9 10 11 
16 17 18 
23 24 25 
30 31 . . 


5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


1 2 3 
8 9 10 
15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 






.... 1 


2 3 
9 10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 .. 


4 

11 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
25 


6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 






1 

8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 
23 
30 


1 


3 4 

10 11 
17 18 
24 25 


5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 


2 
9 
16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 5 6 
11 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 



March 29, Friday— Mid-semester grade reports 

April 17, Wednesday — 4:00 p.m. Easter recess begins 

April 24, Wednesday — 8:00 a.m. Easter recess ends 

May 16, Thursday — 4:00 p.m. Senior Reading period begins 

May 28-30, Tuesday to Thursday — Senior Comprehensive Examinations 



ember 1st, schedule for the same 
> semester basis with the summer 



CALENDAR FOR 1946 



JANUARY 


JULY 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 


6 7 

13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


1 2 3 

8 9 10 
15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

26 


7' 
14 
21 
28 


1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


2 3 4 
9 10 11 
16 17 18 
23 24 25 
30 31 . 


5 e 

12 13 
19 20 
26 27 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 






1 
8 

15 
22 


2 
9 

16 

23 






.... 1 


2 3. 

9 10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 31 


3 4 

10 11 
17 18 
24 25 


5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 

19 

26 


6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 23 29 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


5 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 






1 

B 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 
30 


1 

8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 
23 
JO 


3 4 5 
10 11 12 
17 18 19 
24 25 26 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


3 4 

10 11 
17 18 
24 25 

31 . . 


5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


m 


T W T 


F S 


. . 1 
7 8 
14 15 
21 22 

28 29 


2 3 4 

9 10 11 
16 17 18 
23 24 25 
30 .. . 


5 
12 

19 
26 


6 
13 

2:» 
27 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 

14 
21 

Zi 


1 2 3 
8 9 10 
15 16 17 
22 23 24 
29 30 31 


4 5 
11 12 
18 19 
25 26 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 




. . 1 2 


3 

10 
17 
24 

3! 


4 

11 

18 

25 


3 
10 

17 

24 


4 
51 

18 
25 


5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 
26 27 28 


1 2 
8 9 
15 16 
22 23 
29 30 


5 6 
12-13 
19 20 
26 27 


7 8 9 
14 15 1G 
21 22 23 

28 29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T W T 


F S 








1 

8 
IS 

22 
29 


1 

8 
15 

22 

29 


2 
9 

16 
23 

30 


3 4 5 
10 11 12 
17 18 19 
24 25 26 
31 .. .. 


6 7 
13 14 
20 21 
27 28 


2 3 
9 10 
16 17 
23 24 
30 .. 


4 5 6 
11 v 12 13 
18 19 20 
25 26 27 


7 
14 
21 

28 



^EES 

J 947 

13 Main Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Shelby, Ohio 

Box D, San Clemente, California 

Wellsburg, W.Va. 

jo Lincoln Blvd., Kenmore, N.Y. 
1 Euclid Ave., E. Cleveland, Ohio 

Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

. . .Box 765, East Liverpool, Ohio 

1946 

University City, Mo. 

Shelby, Ohio 

and Trust Bldg., Uniontown, Pa. 

Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Hand Drive, Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 
Vheeling Clinic, Wheeling, W.Va. 
s & Trust Co., Steubenville, Ohio 
Allison Avenue, Washington, Pa. 
DeHart Street, Morristown, NJ. 

1945 

Butler, Pa. 

lian Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 
Jat'l Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
n Trust Bldg., Washington, D.C. 

Shelby,Ohio 

lenneth Avenue, Greensburg, Pa. 
of Trade Bldg., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Steel Company, Weirton, W.Va. 



Faculty Representative for 1944-1945: John J. Knight 



CALENDAR 

Spring Semester 
1945 

March 1, Thursday — Registration for Spring Semester 

March 2, Friday — Classes begin 

April 27, Friday — Mid-semester | 

May 30, Wednesday — Senior rea< 

June 11 to 13, Monday to Wedn( 

June 17, Sunday — Annual Comm 

June 18 to 21, Monday to Thurs< 

Summer Seme: 

(And othc 

July 2-3, Monday and Tuesday- 
July 3, Tuesday — Registration fo 
July 3, Tuesday — Classes begin 
August 24, Friday — Mid-semeste 
September 28, Friday — Reading ] 
October 9-1 1, Tuesday to Thursd 
October 14, Sunday — Graduation 
October 17-20, Wednesday to Sa 



July 2-3, Monday and Tuesday- 
July 3, Tuesday — Registration fo 
July 3, Tuesday — Classes begin 
August 24-25, Friday and Saturd 



September 17, 18, 19, Monday to 
September 20, Thursday — Registi 
September 21, Friday — 8:00 a.m., 
November 16, Friday — Mid-seme: 
December 20, Thursday — 4:00 p.* 

I946 

January 2, Wednesday — 8:00 a.m 
January 10, Thursday — 4:00 p.m. 
January 22-23, Tuesday and Wed 
January 23-26, Wednesday to Sat 
January 27, Sunday — Graduation 

t 

s. 

January 30, 31, Wednesday and T 
January 31, Thursday — Registrati 
February i, Friday — 8:00 a.m. Classes begin 



March 29, Friday — Mid-semester grade reports 

April 17, Wednesday — 4:00 p.m. Easter recess begins 

April 24, Wednesday — 8:00 a.m. Easter recess ends 

May 16, Thursday — 4:00 p.m. Senior Reading period begins 

May 28-30, Tuesday to Thursday — Senior Comprehensive Examinations 

June 2, Sunday — Annual Commencement 

June 3-6, Monday to Thursday — Final Examinations 

If the Navy training program continues beyond November 1st, schedule for the same 
will be announced at that time. 

Beginning July 1945, the college will operate on a two semester basis with the summer 
term. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1947 

W. H. Fields 843 Main Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

**W. W. Van Horn. ' Shelby, Ohio 

*Argyle Campbell Box D, San Clemente, California 

W. S. Wilkin. ' Wellsburg, W.Va. 

F. O. Carfer 50 Lincoln Blvd., Kenmore, N.Y. 

>r. R. R. Renner 12900 Euclid Ave., E. Cleveland, Ohio 

H. O. Evans Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sidney C. Porter Box 765, East Liverpool, Ohio 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1946 

Hon. Bennett Champ Clark University City, Mo. 

J. C. Morris Shelby, Ohio 

Alfred E. Wright 302 Fayette Title and Trust Bldg., Uniontown, Pa. 

Dr. J. Parke McMullen Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Frank M. Hesse 37 Woodland Drive, Pittsburgh (16), Pa. 

Dr. Russell B. Bailey Wheeling Clinic, Wheeling, W.Va. 

GIeorge J. Barthold Miners & Mechanics Savings & Trust Co., Steubenville, Ohio 

John W. Love 340 Allison Avenue, Washington, Pa. 

Lt. Robert McKinney 17 DeHart Street, Morristown, N.J. 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1945 

Thomas W. Phillips, Jr Butler, Pa. 

John M. Smith 1321 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 

R. A. Balderson Farmers Nat'l Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John Marshall Union Trust Bldg., Washington, D.C. 

Robert D. Hurl , Shelby,Ohio 

Daniel F. Mullane 202 Kenneth Avenue, Greensburg, Pa. 

Austin V. Wood Board of Trade Bldg., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Thomas E. Millsop Weirton Steel Company, Weirton, W.Va. 

* Deceased August 12, 1944 
** Deceased February 22, 1945 

Faculty Representative for 1944-1945: John J. Knight 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

W. S. Wilkin, Chairman 

W. H, Cramblet, President and Treasurer 

N. W. Evans, Secretary 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Executive: 

Mr. Wilkin, Dr. McMullen, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Wright, Mr. Hesse 
Mr. Porter, Mr. Mullane, Mr. Hurl. 
Mr. Kirkpatrick, Secretary 

Alumni Cooperation: 

Mr. Carfer, Mr. Hesse, Mr. Porter. 

Buildings and Grounds: 

Mr. Phillips, Mr. Hurl, Mr. Porter, Mr. Barthold, Mr. Millsop. 

Church Cooperation: 

Mr. Morris, Mr. Carfer, Mr. Love. 

Finance and Budget 

Dr. McMullen, Mr. Wright, Mr. Wilkin, Mr. Mullane. 

Investment: 

Mr. Wright, President Cramblet. 

Library: 

Dr. Renner, Mr. Evans, Mr. Wood. 

Nominations: 

Mr. Marshall, Mr. Morris, Dr. McMullen. 

Student Welfare: 

Mr. Hurl, Mr. Marshall, Dr. Renner, Mr. Mullane. 

Post War Planning: 

Mr. Mullane, Mr. Porter, Dr. Bailey, Mr. Hurl, Mr. Hesse, Mr. Wright. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet , President of the College 

William Kirk Woolery Provost 

Bernal Robinson Weimer Bean of the Faculty 

*Forrest Hunter Kirkpatrick Dean of Students 

Florence Marian Hoagland Academic Advisor for Women 

Edgar Hugh Behymer Librarian 

Newton Wallace Evans Bursar 

George Carl Hettler Executive Secretary 

Jay Moore Potter Acting Director of Admissions 

Edgar Wade Mahan, M.D College Physician 

Margaret Carrigan Social Director 

* On leave of absence. 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION* 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet, President of the College on the M. M. Cochran Foundation 
and Professor of Mathematics. (Professor 191 7; President 1934) 
A. B., Bethany College; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh. 



Jean Corrodi Moos, Professor-Emeritus of Music. (1 897-1934) 

College of Music, Zurich; Royal Conservatory of Music, Leipsig; A.M., Mus.D., 
Bethany College; Oberlin College; Columbia University. 

Henry Newton Miller, Professor-Emeritus of Bible School Pedagogy on the Herbert 
Moninger Foudnation. (1914-1937) 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; D.D., Bethany College. 

Ebenezer Lee Perry, Professor-Emeritus of Latin. (1908-1939) 

A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; A.M., Columbia University; Litt.D., 
Bethany College. 



Pearl Mahaffey, Professor of Modern Languages. (1908) 

A.B., Miami University; University of California; A.M., Columbia University; Uni- 
versity of Grenoble; McGill University; University of Paris; Harvard University; 
National University of Mexico. 

Frank Roy Gay, Professor of Classics. (19 10) 

A.B., A.M., Drake University; University of Virginia; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Andrew Leitch, Sarah B. Cochran Professor of Psychology. (1920) 

A.B., A.M., Butler College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; Columbia University; 
University of Chicago; University of Pennsylvania; Harvard University. 

William Kirk Woolery, Provost and George T. Oliver Professor of History and Political 
Science. (1921) 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., University of California; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

Bernal Robinson Weimer, Dean of the Faculty and Prof essor of Biology. (1921) 
A.B., A.M., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Irvin Taylor Green, Professor of New Testament and Church History. (1921) 

A.B., Transylvania College; A.M., B.D., Bethany College; University of Chicago. 



* The names are arranged in order of faculty rank and seniority of appointment. The 
date in parentheses indicates first appointment to this faculty. 



Forrest Hunter Kirkpatrick, Bean of Students and Prof ess or of Education. (1927) 

A.B., Bethany College; University of Dijon; A.M., Columbia University; University 
of Pittsburgh; Professional diploma as clinical psychologist from Columbia Univer- 
sity; University of London. 

Emmett Ephriam Roberts, Professor of English. (1928) 

A.B., Ohio University; A.M., Ohio State University; New York University. 

Osborne Booth, T. W. Phillips Professor of Old Testament. (1929) 

A.B., Hiram College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. 

John J. Knight, Prof essor of Physical Education. (1930) 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College; University of Michigan; Ohio State University. 

John Stanley Valentine Allen, Professor of Physics. (1933) 
B.Eng., M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Charles Rush Carter, Pro f essor of Music. (1934) 

Combs Conservatory, Temple University; B.S. in Ed., A.M., New York University; 
Juilliard School of Music. 

Florence Marian Hoagland, Academic Adviser for Women and Pro* essor of English. 
(1936) 
A.B., Cornell University; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., Cornell University; 
University of Cambridge. 

Reuben Hamilton Eliassen, Professor of Education. (1936) 

A.B., St. Olaf College; University of Minnesota; A.M., Columbia University; Stanford 
University; University of Chicago; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Dwight Eshelman Stevenson, Professor of Religion and Philosophy. (1936) 
A.B., Bethany College, B.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. 

Harry Lawrence Ice, Professor of Religion and Philosophy and Director of Ministerial 
Training. (1944) 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Ph.D., George Washington University; D.D., Bethany 
College. 

Chandler Shaw, Associate Professor of History. (1935) 

A.B., Rollins College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; American Academy 
in Rome; Royal University, Perugia, Italy. 

George W. Bennett, Associate Professor of Chemistry. (1943) 

B.S., Denison University; M.S., Washington and Jefferson College; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

Franklin Allen Simmons, Associate Professor of Mathematics. (1943) 
B.S., C.E., Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 



1 On leave of absence, in interest of war production, for work with Radio Corporation 
of America. 

2 On leave of absence in service with U. S. Navy. 



Burton H. Gildersleeve, Associate Professor of Economics. (1944) 

B.S., State University of Iowa; M.B.A., New York University; Cornell University; 
Ohio State University. 

Erwin C. Paustian, Associate Professor of Sociology. (1944) 

B.A., Central Wesleyan College; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University; University 
of Chicago; University of Minnesota. 

Wilbur John Sumpstine, Assistant Prof essor of Biology and Geology. (1925) 

B.S., Bethany College; West Virginia University; M.S., University of Chicago; Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. 

Earl D. McKenzie, Assistant Professor of Modern Languages. (1937) 

A.B., Brown University; A.M., Columbia University; University of Frankfurt am 
Main; Yale University; University of Pittsburgh. 

1 Charles Clifford Barlow, Director of Admissions with rank of Assistant Professor. 

(1938) _ 
A.B., Illinois College; University of Illinois; Litt.M., University of Pittsburgh. 

2 Margaret Carrigan, Social Director and Assistant Prof essor of English. (1939). 

A.B., Columbia University; A.M., Syracuse University; Columbia University; Cornell 
University. 

Edgar Hugh Behymer, Librarian with rank of Assistant Professor. (1941) 

A.B., Indiana University; B.L.S., University of Michigan; A.M., University of Chi- 
cago. 

3 James Wagner Alexander, Instructor in English. (1940) 

A.B., A.M., University of Georgia; University of Perugia; University of Padua; Uni- 
versity of Grenoble; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

x Arnold Nichqlsen, Instructor in Physical Education. (1942) 
B.S., M.S., University of Alabama. 

Pauline Eley, Instructor in Secretarial Training. (1942) 

A.B., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; Bowling Green College of Commerce 

John Shields Cluss, Instructor in Mathematics. (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Grace Benedict Goodwin, Instructor in Physical Education. (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Jay Moore Potter, Director of Admissions with rank of Instructor. (1943) 

A.B., Bethany College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; University of West Vir- 
ginia. 

Hilda Sarver, Instructor in Chemistry. (1943) 
B.S., Bethany College; Iowa State College. 

1 Resigned as of March, 1945. 

2 On leave of absence for winter and spring semesters, 1944-1945. 

3 On leave of absence in service with U. S. Army. 



Bradford Tye, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1943) 

B.S., Alma White College; Rutgers University; M.S., New York University. 

Margaret WcnqDs, Instructor in Modern Languages and Acting Social Director. (1943) 
A.B., Wellesley College; M.A., Pennsylvania State College; Middlebury College; 
Columbia University; .Colorado College; Universit6 de Besancon. 

1 Wanda Zblec, Instructor in Mathematics. (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

2 J. Calvin Fleming, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 
A.B., College of Wooster; University of Pittsburgh. 

Blandina Foster, Instructor in English. (1944) 

A.B., Albright College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

Paul E. Brown, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 

A.B., Geneva College; A.M., University of Michigan; University of Pennsylvania. 

x Frank M. Ellis, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh. 

x Fred Adam Miller, Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. (1944) 
B.S., Muskingum College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

Howard B. Trombley, Instructor in Chemistry and Physics. (1944) 
A.B., Waynesburg College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

Elizabeth Jean Murphy, Instructor in Biology. (1944) 

B.S., Bethany College; M.S., University of New Hampshire. 

George K. Hauptfuehrer, Instructor in Music. (1945) 

A.B., B.M., Friends University; M.A., University of Kansas. 

James Blair Mjller, Instructor in Religious Education. (1945) 
A.B., Bethany College; B.D., Yale University. 

Martha Bibb Vacca, Instructor in Music. (1945) 

A.B., Missouri Valley College; Oregon State College; Eastman School of Music. 

S. Elizabeth Reed, Instructor in Physical Education. (1945) 

A.B., Muskingum College, M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, University of Wisconsin. 



Alberta Frances Quinlin, Recorder and Associate in Guidance and Personnel. (1936) 
A.B., Bethany College; Columbia University. 

Wilma M. Sumpstine, Associate in Biology. (1943) 
A.B., Bethany College. 



1 Resigned as of March, 1945. 

2 Resigned as of November, 1944. 



NAVY STAFF 

OFFICERS 
Lieut. Gordon J. Longley, (S), USNR, Commanding Officer, June 1944- 

Lieut. Herbert C. Pfeiffer, (S), USNR, Executive Officer, August 1943 to February 
1945 

Lieut. James H. Northrup, (D), USNR, Executive Officer, February 1945- 

Lieut. Theron J. Williams, D-V(S), USNR, First Lieutenant, August 1944 to September 
1944 

Lieut, (jg) Joseph F. Coughlin, D-V(S), USNR, First Lieutenant, September 1944 to 
October 1944 

Lieut. Comdr. George S. Peters, (MC), USNR, Medical Officer, July 1944- 

Lieut. (jg) Juanita Miller Spector, (SC), W, USNR, Disbursing Officer, March 1944 
to October 1944 

Lieut, (jg) Wilma W. Thomas, (SC), W, USNR, Disbursing Officer, September 1944 to 
January 1945 

Ens. Ruth Disney, (SC), W, USNR, Disbursing Officer, December 1944- 

INSTRUCTORS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Max, Daniel H., CSp(A) (PA), V6, USNR, June 1943- 

Redding, James A., CSp(A) (PA), V6, USNR, August 1944- 

Winterton, John L., CSp(A) (T), V6, USNR, August 1944 to December 1944 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Edgar Hugh Behymer Librarian 

A.B., Indiana University; A.B.L.S., University of Michigan; M.A., University of 
Chicago. 

Joseph N. Whitten Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Mississippi College; George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Lois J. Behymer Cataloguer 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

*Samuel Sprigg Jacob, M.D College Physician 

A.B., West Virginia University; M.D., Jefferson Medical College. 

Edgar Wade Mahan, M.D Acting College Physician 

A.B., Bethany College; M.D., University of Maryland. 

1 On leave of absence in service with U. S. Army. 



Catherine Springer, R.N College Nurse and Supervisor of Infirmary 

Gladys Carnahan Gibson, R.N , Student Nurse 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 
Lucille Ball Head Dietitian and Dormitory Manager 

Dorothy Rohland Baum Secretary to the President 

Clayton E. Benedict Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Katherine Blackford Dietitian, Bethany House 

Hazel M. Cluss Secretary to the Executive Secretary 

Marjorie Hunter Cope,nhaver Associate in Guidance and Personnel 

Marion Culley Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Pauline Gilbert Secretary to the Dean of the Faculty 

Gloria Knepper Assistant Dietitian 

Harry Milton Meyers Bookkeeper 

Dorothy Patton Cashier 

Florence Prendegast Dietitian, Phillips Hall 

Dessie Mae Rupe Secretary to the Bursar 

RESIDENTS OF COLLEGE DORMITORIES 

Margaret Carrigan Head of Residence and Social Director 

Margaret Woods Acting Head of Residence and Social Director 

House Supervisor — Gateway Hall 

Jessie Beans House Supervisor — Alpha Kappa Pi House 

Mary Belle Carman House Supervisor — Zeta Tau Alpha House 

Vira M. Hettler House Supervisor — Sigma Nu House 

Grace Hine House Supervisor — Alpha Xi Delta House 

Bess Magee House Supervisor — Phi Mu House 

Ethel D. Metzner House Supervisor — Kappa Delta House 

Elsie Porterfield House Supervisor — Helwig House 

Anna Reeves House Supervisor — Gay House 

Margaret Wilson House Supervisor — Colonial House 



FUNCTIONAL COMMITTEES OF FACULTY 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Academic Council: 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Woolery, Mr. Eliassen, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Allen, Mr. Stevenson, 
Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Admissions and Classifications: 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Weimer, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Honors: 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. McKenzie, Miss Hoagland. 

Lectures and Concerts: 

Mr. Behymer, Mr. Weimer, Mr. Carter. 

Library: 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Leitch, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Allen, Mr. Paustian, Mr. Behymer. 

Schedule: 

Mr. Allen, Mr. McKenzie, Mr. Roberts. 

Curriculum of the Liberal Arts College: 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Woolery, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Stevenson, Mr. Eliassen, Mr. Allen. 

Courses for Veterans and War Workers: 

Mr. Allen, Mr. Weimer, Mr. Gildersleeve, Mr. Bennett, Miss Carrigan. 

Student Welfare and Guidance 

Council on Guidance and Personnel: 

Mr. Weimer, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Stevenson, Miss Carrigan, Dr. Mahan, Mr.Hettler, 
Mr. Kirkpatrick, Mr. Miller. 

Activities and Social Life: 

Miss Carrigan, Miss Mahaffey, Mr. Carter, Miss Woods. 

Placement: 

Mr. Eliassen, Mr. Bennett, Miss Quinlin, Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Athletics and Physical Recreation: 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Sumpstine, Mr. Knight, Mr. Nicholsen, Miss Benedict. 

Religious Life: 

Mr. Stevenson, Miss Mahaffey, Mr. Eliassen. 

Financial Aids: 

Mr. Cramblet, Mr. Potter, Mr. Hettler, Mr. Kirkpatrick. 

Counselling of Veterans 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Eliassen, Mr. Leitch, Mr. Kirkpatrick. 



PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



PURPOSE 

The continuing purpose of Bethany College is to assist its stu- 
dents in their preparation for intelligent and creative participation 
in contemporary living, and to maintain in its faculty and student 
body standards of excellence in scholarship, culture, and conduct. 

The particular aims of the college are: 

(i) To impart basic knowledge and to develop those habits, 
skills, and attitudes that contribute to the most effective 
personal and group living. 

(2) To establish sound habits of study and critical thought by 
investigation, experimentation, reading, and discussion. 

(3) To provide opportunity for the development of health, 
physical fitness, good taste, poise, and courtesy. 

(4) To promote broad knowledge of and love for the United 
States of America through a deeper understanding of her 
achievements, hopes, and capacities, to stimulate appreci- 
ation for the institutions and cultural contributions of man- 
kind, and to arouse a fellow-feeling for all nations and races. 

(5) To develop appreciation for great literature, and to en- 
courage self-expression in speaking, writing, and the fine 
arts. 

(6) To enable the student to concentrate in an area of interest 
leading toward a vocation or specialization in one particular 
field. 

(7) To provide higher education in an atmosphere of Christian 
ideals and Christian faith and to develop the moral char- 
acter and religious life of its students. 

HISTORY 

Buffalo Seminary, the forerunner of Bethany College, was in- 
augurated at Bethany, Virginia, in the year 181 8 in the home of 
Alexander Campbell, commonly known as the Mansion. Here, for 
some years, Mr. Campbell offered educational advantages for the 
youth of the community as well as training for young men in the 
work of the Christian ministry. 

A charter was granted to the Trustees of Bethany College by the 
Legislature of Virginia on March 2, 1 840, authorizing the estab- 



16 Bethany College Bulletin 

lishment of a "seminary of learning for the instruction of youth in 
the various branches of science and literature, the useful arts, agri- 
culture, and the learned and foreign languages." 

The trustees of the college named Mr. Campbell as the first 
president and directed him to formulate a plan for instruction for 
the new institution. In October of 1841, the first session opened 
with over a hundred students in attendance. 

Bethany College, like all other educational institutions of the 
United States, is cooperating as fully as possible to further the war 
efforts of our nation. To aid in training young men and women 
for national service in the shortest feasible period, the college 
adopted an accelerated program early in the war, making it pos- 
sible for students to graduate in less than three years and thus be 
prepared to enter war service at the earliest possible moment. 

A Civilian Pilot Training unit was established on the campus in 
July of 1942, using college residence halls and college instructors, 
and continuing for a year. July 1, 1943, the United States Navy 
selected Bethany as an institution for the location of a V-12 train- 
ing unit. The program was carried on under the supervision of the 
Fifth Naval District. Some 330 young men were designated for the 
Bethany unit, with a minimum required basic course and the 
privilege of choosing from the general college offerings for their 
electives. Three sixteen-week terms for the calendar year were es- 
tablished, and for the convenience of designation and evaluation 
of credits these terms were designated respectively as the summer, 
winter, and spring semesters. 

The Navy training program will continue during the summer 
of 1945, with the semester beginning July 2, 1945. At this time 
the college will return to normal two semester program for civilian 
students. 



ADMISSION AND INDUCTION 



General Requirements — Bethany College will accept as stu- 
dents only young men and young women who are well qualified 
to benefit from the type of educational experience and academic 
life available. All applicants for admission must furnish evidence 
of high moral character, good physical and mental health, sound 
scholastic preparation, and intellectual maturity. The Committee 
on Admissions and Classifications will consider the best interests of 
the applicant and the college before final acceptance is made. New 
students will be admitted at the beginning of any semester or term. 

Freshman Admission — Applicants for admission to the fresh- 
man class will be judged acceptable in terms of scholastic prepara- 
tion and intellectual maturity by any one of the following three 
plans: 

I. By Certificate 

(a) Graduates of any accredited high school or secondary 
school may be admitted to freshman standing on pres- 
entation of statement signed by proper school author- 
ities, showing the kind of and the amount of scholastic 
work done, provided the scholastic work completed is 
of such quality as to place the student in the upper 
half of his graduating class. Exceptions to this will 
be made only upon adequate evidence from scholastic 
aptitude tests administered by a competent examiner 
at the college or at the secondary school. 

(b) Those students of exceptional ability with high rank in 
their high school class and with the whole-hearted rec- 
ommendation of their high school principals may be 
admitted after three and one half years in high school 
if their records indicate the completion of at least fif- 
teen acceptable units of secondary school work. Most 
of the states in this area have indicated by official ac- 
tion that such high school students will be granted their 
diplomas from the secondary school upon completion 
of a year's work in college with satisfactory grades. 

(c) Two- thirds of the units of secondary school work ac- 



1 8 Bethany College Bulletin 

cepted for entrance must be in English, foreign lan- 
guage, mathematics, natural sciences, and social stud- 
ies. These units should normally include three units of 
English, at least three units of a foreign language or 
social studies, and two units of mathematics or science. 
In the case of graduates of senior high schools the same 
general pattern of units is desired. 

II. By Examination 

Students who have not been regularly prepared for college 
in a recognized secondary school may apply for admission by mak- 
ing a complete statement regarding qualifications and training. 
Such students can be regularly admitted if they qualify in a bat- 
tery of achievement examinations given at the college under the 
direction of the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. The 
examinations will be given upon the scholastic work covered by 
the list of secondary units approved by the North Central Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

College Entrance Board Examination certificates will be 
accepted in lieu of high school certificates or examinations by 
Bethany College. 

III. By Cumulative Record 

The Committee on Admissions and Classifications will re- 
ceive cumulative standard test records and other objective data 
which may give evidence of an applicant's ability to profit by col- 
lege experience. Such records or data should (i) cover at least 
the three most recent years of the applicant's school life, (2) pro- 
vide fairly reliable information as to his intellectual capacity, (3) 
include an accurate record of the results of comparable achieve- 
ment measures in various academic subjects. Data obtained from 
all tests will be interpreted in authenticated comparable terms, 
such as well established public school or independent school per- 
centiles. 

Advanced Standing — Students from other accredited colleges 
may be admitted upon the presentation of evidence that they have 
satisfied the general requirements for admission and that they 
were in good standing in the institution last attended. All applica- 
tions for admission from students for advanced standing must be 
accompanied by official certificates stating the nature and extent 



Bethany College Bulletin 19 

of college courses completed and all disciplinary or academic items 
that belong to such a record. Such a statement must be signed by 
the president or other official of the institution where the work was 
done. 

The evaluation and acceptance of credits earned at an accredited 
institution will depend upon the quality of the academic work 
completed. Only a minimum of academic work ranked below "av- 
erage" (grade C) will be accepted. Not more than sixty-five hours 
will be allowed for junior college work. 

Credit allowed for work done or courses followed in the Armed 
Forces will depend on the nature of the materials or the training, 
its relation to the liberal arts courses, and the appraisal received 
from the United States Armed Forces Institute of the courses 
taken. 

Credit will be allowed for work done in non-accredited institu- 
tions only by special action of the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications. This Committee may require that the applicant 
take a series of subject matter examinations, or that the applicant 
be classified one class below that attained in the institution from 
which the credits were presented. 

A student transferring to Bethany cannot be granted a degree 
unless he has been in attendance at the college at least during his 
senior year. 

Admission of Veterans — Veterans returning for completion 
of work for degrees, for retraining and refresher courses, or enter- 
ing college in beginning work will be given due consideration for 
special training and allowed special treatment, as individual cases 
may deserve, in respect to credits and requirements for degrees. 

Special Students — A limited number of students who are not 
candidates for a degree may be admitted to the college as "Special 
Students" with permission to pursue selected courses. Application 
must be made for such classification, and approval for the same 
may be given only if the applicant can satisfy the Committee on 
Admissions and Classifications that he can pursue the courses with 
profit, that he has a serious purpose in mind, and that he can meet 
the general requirements as to health, character, and mental abil- 
ity. 

Advanced Standing by Achievement Tests — Any students 
who have anticipated the subject matter of any of the prescrip- 
tions for degrees listed under the requirement of hours may make 



20 Bethany College Bulletin 

application to take an achievement test. If the result of this test in- 
dicates sufficient mastery of the subject the prescription will be 
waived. Passing the achievement tests will not give credit in hours 
toward the degree. The application for an achievement test should 
be made to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. It 
should state the achievement tests which the student desires to 
take and the basis of his preparation for the test. The statement 
should include detail as to any supplementary reading done in 
addition to the prescribed school work in the form of a list of titles 
and authors of books. The testing will be in charge of the Dean of 
Students and the heads of the departments concerned. 

Placement Tests for Freshmen — For purposes of educational 
guidance all freshmen are required to take placement examinations 
in certain academic subjects such as English, history, and foreign 
languages. These examinations are given before the final registra- 
tion at the opening of the college year in order that failures due to 
misplacement in courses may be avoided if possible. The type of 
examination used is designed to test the readiness with which the 
student can adapt his knowledge to the requirements of college 
work. The results of these examinations are used to determine a 
student's placement in courses and in sections. 

Orientation Program and Registration — The college recog- 
nizes the need of giving newly entering students an introduction to 
their work, and for this purpose it requires freshmen to come to 
Bethany several days before the formal registration of all other 
students. These "Freshman Days" are devoted to efforts to help 
the freshmen make a proper adjustment. "Freshman Days" are 
scheduled at the beginning of each semester. 

Attendance during "Freshman Days" is required of all who will 
enter as freshmen. The dates for the summer term of 1945 are 
July 2 and 3; for the fall semester, September 17, 18, 19; and for 
the spring semester of 1946, January 30 and 31. 

Pre-College Guidance — At various times during the year op- 
portunity is offered for the pre-college guidance of secondary 
school juniors and seniors who are looking toward college. At these 
times it is possible for parents and students to confer with officers 
of the college, to have school records appraised, and to take college 
aptitude tests. This service is offered to prospective students with- 
out obligation to them and may be secured at the college and by 
appointment in other centers as New York, Buffalo^ Pittsburgh, 



Bethany College Bulletin 21 

Cleveland, Detroit, and Chicago. Arrangement for pre-college 
guidance of any kind should be made with the Director of Ad- 
missions. 

Method of Enrollment — All matters related to the enroll- 
ment of new students are handled through the office of the Director 
of Admissions. The proper form to be used in making application 
for admission and blanks to be used in making application for a 
room in one of the college dormitories will be supplied by his office. 
The Application for Admission (see preliminary form in back of 
catalogue) should be filed as early as possible and must be ac- 
companied by the admission fee of $10.00. In case application is 
denied, the admission fee will be refunded. These should be mailed 
directly to the Director of Admissions. If the student is accepted 
and for any reason is unable to attend Bethany College, $7.00 of 
the admission fee will be refunded provided notice of this decision 
is given to the college on or before the specific dates designated 
on the application forms. If withdrawal occurs after these dates, 
no part of the application fee will be refunded. 

The Committee on Admissions and Classifications will review 
applications within two weeks after they are received and notice 
of action taken will be sent directly to the applicant. The admis- 
sion fee serves as a dormitory room reservation deposit if the appli- 
cant is accepted, and is set aside as a breakage deposit at the time 
of registration at the college. 

Reservation of Dormitory Rooms — All rooms in college dor- 
mitories must be engaged in advance. In case the student remains 
in the dormitory for the full year, the admission fee will be re- 
funded, except for proper charges for breakage and inspection. In 
the case of withdrawal from the dormitory after registration, 
charges for room rental are refunded on a pro-rata basis, but the 
deposit fee is forfeited by the student. 

Plans showing the arrangement of rooms in the dormitories, de- 
tailed statement of prices, and reservation blanks may be obtained 
from the Director of Admissions. 



EXPENSES 

Tuition — The tuition for each semester is one hundred and 
thirty-seven dollars and fifty cents ($137.50) for fifteen academic 
hours or less. For each academic hour in excess of fifteen, an addi- 
tional eight dollars is charged. No charge is made for required 
courses in physical education or orientation taken to meet the 
graduation requirements. 

Tuition for special students carrying less than twelve hours is 
$12.00 per semester hour. Special fees will be charged as usual in 
such cases. 

By special action of the Board of Trustees, the tuition for alumni 
of the college has been set at twenty-five dollars per semester. All 
special fees will be charged as usual in such cases. 

By special action of the Board of Trustees, members of families 
of home and foreign missionaries actively in service are allowed 
free tuition for regular academic work at the college. 

FEES 

Admission Fee — A fee of ten dollars is required with each Ap- 
plication for Admission. At the time a student enrolls at the college 
this fee becomes a guarantee and breakage deposit on the room of 
a student living in one of the college dormitories. The college re- 
serves the right to make legitimate charges against the room and 
breakage deposit fee for any damage done to the room or its 
furnishings, and to declare forfeiture of the key deposit fee if keys 
are not returned immediately after the room is vacated. In case 
the student does not occupy the room as agreed in the room con- 
tract, the fee is forfeited by the student. If the applicant is not 
planning to live in a college dormitory, the fees will be applied on 
the tuition charge. 

Health, Library, and Matriculation Fee — A health, li- 
brary, and matriculation fee of $10.00 each semester is charged to 
all students. 

Student Activities Fee — A student activities fee of $10.00 
each semester is charged to all students. This fee covers expenses 
in connection with athletic competitions and contests, lectures and 
concerts, and a variety of extra-curricular activities directly man- 
aged by the Student Board of Governors. 



Bethany College Bulletin 23 

MEN'S RESIDENCE HALL 

Cochran Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $70.00 per 
semester for the fall and spring semesters for each student. Single 
and double rooms are provided. At present this building is oc- 
cupied by the Navy V-12 unit. 

Bed spreads and curtains are furnished and laundered for all 
residents. Young men rooming in this hall are expected to furnish 
their own bed linen, blankets, towels, study lamps, and rugs. They 
are expected to care for their own rooms. 

WOMAN'S RESIDENCE HALLS 

Phillips Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $70.00 per 
semester for each student. This hall will be available for women 
students at the beginning of the fall semester. 

Helwig House — The rent for rooms in this house is $60.00 per 
semester for each student. This building is now occupied by the 
Navy V-12 unit. 

Gateway Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $60.00 for 
the summer semester and $70.00 per semester for the fall and 
spring semesters for each student. 

The rental charge in Phillips Hall, Helwig House, and Gate- 
way Hall includes such items as electric lights, janitor service, use 
of kitchenettes, and laundries. Rooms must be engaged in advance. 

Dormitory Houses — Rooms in certain of these houses are re- 
served for young women affiliated with sorority groups. They are 
rented by the individual student who signs a rental contract for 
her room under the same conditions which apply in other residence 
halls but the sorority group is responsible for providing a minimum 
number of occupants. If this number is not provided the group can 
be charged a monthly rental to take care of the loss of income to 
the college. 

The rent for rooms in these houses is $60.00 per semester for 
each student. Single and double rooms are available. 

Young women living in any of college residence halls are ex- 
pected for furnish comforts, blankets, curtains, sheets, pillow 
cases, towels, study lamps and rugs. They are expected to care for 
their own rooms. 



24 Bethany College Bulletin 

GENERAL REGULATIONS IN ALL RESIDENCE HALLS 

Permission for the installation of radios and special electrical 
equipment in any of these halls must be obtained from the Head 
of Residence and a charge may be assessed for such items. 

Room assignments in all college dormitories are made for the 
academic year. For freshmen they are made in the order of appli- 
cation; for upperclassmen, in the order of class membership, sup- 
plemented by the drawing of lots. Any request for a change of 
assignment must be approved by the officer in charge, and a new- 
contract issued. Preference is given to upperclassmen only for a 
limited time. 

Single and double rooms are available in all residence halls. 

Double rooms may not be reserved by one student without extra 
charge. 

Residence halls will be open for freshmen for each semester the 
day before Freshman Days, and for upperclassmen the day before 
registration. 

Residence halls will be closed when college is not in session. 

Bethany College reserves all rights in connection with the as- 
signment, termination of occupancy, and re-assignment of rooms 
in all dormitories. 

BOARD 

Previous to July 1943 young women of the college obtained 
board at Phillips Hall and the young men at the Bethany House. 
Since July 1, 1943 both the young women and young men have ob- 
tained board in the Bethany House. Beginning with the fall 
semester, 1945, young women will all board at Phillips Hall. 
Board for college students beginning July 1, 1945 will be $7.50 
per week. All students are expected to board at college dining 
halls. The price of board is subject to revision in case of change 
in general price levels. 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR SEMESTER 

Tuition $137 . 50 

Room in College Dormitory $60.00 to 70.00 

Board at College Dining Hall ($7.50 per week) 127.50 

Student Activities Fee 10 .00 

Health, Library and Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Total required fees for semester $347 -0° to 350.00 



Bethany College Bulletin 25 

MISCELLANEOUS FRESHMAN FEES 

Admission Fee (All new students) $10.00 

(This fee must be paid before any action is taken on 
application for admission.) 

Freshman Days Fee (First term or semester only) 10.00 

(Freshman testing program, etc.) 

Deposit for Dormitory Room Key 1 .00 

To the above cost must be added fees for special courses, the 
cost of books, clothing, laundry, travel, and personal spending 
money. The cost of books for the college year (two semesters) 
averages $25 to $35. The other items are not unusual but will be 
determined bv the individual student. 

The college is required to collect the West Virginia Sales Tax of 
2% on room and board in addition to published charges for the 
same. 

MUSIC FEES 

Private Lessons, two lessons a week, per semester $50.00 

Private Lessons, one lesson a week, per semester 27 . 00 

Organ Practice, one hour each day, per semester 20,00 

Piano Practice, one hour each day, per semester 5 .00 

Piano Practice, three hours per week, per semester 3 .00 

Practice Room for instrumental music, one hour each day 

per semester 2 .00 

LABORATORY AND COURSE FEES 

Biology 11, 12, 36, 57, 65, 76, 78 $> 6.00 per semester 

Biology 53, 54 7 .00 per semester 

Biology 67 5 .00 per semester 

Biology 91-92 (each hour) 6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 11 A, 21, 22, 75, 76 6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 12A, 25, 26 12.00 per semester 

Chemistry 61, 62 16.00 per semester 

Chemistry 6$, 66 8 .00 per semester 

Chemistry 91, 92 (each hour) 4.00 per semester 

Education 81, 82 20.00 per semester 

Speech and Dramatics 50, 51, 59, 60 2 .00 per semester 

Mathematics 21, 24, 25 4.00 per semester 

Physics 15, 21, 31, 32, 35, 53, 61, 62, 63, 64, 

67, 68 4 .00 per semester 



16 Bethany College Bulletin 

Physics 91, 92 (each hour) 4.00 per semester 

Psychology $3 3 .00 per semester 

Psychology 62, 64 2 .00 per semester 

Secretarial Training 11, 12, 50 5 .00 per semester 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Comprehensive examination for students not in residence. .$25 .00 
Each academic hour when less than twelve, per semester. . 12.00 

Each change in registration after first two weeks 1 .00 

Freshman days fee 10 .00 

Radio use fee, per semester 50 

Room reservation fee for upperclassmen . 5 .00 

Late registration, first three days, per day 2.00 

Special examinations in any department or course 2.00 

Special placement or achievement test in any department. . 2 .00 

Transcript fee (after first issue) 1 .00 

Graduation and diploma fee 10 .00 

Infirmary charge, per day (after three days) 1 .00 

BREAKAGE AND GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 

Certain fees are charged to cover cost of materials placed in the 
hands of students or as a guarantee of proper performance of duties 
assigned. Unused balances of these fees are refunded at the end of 
the college year. 

Biology 34 f 5 .00 per semester 

Biology 53, 54 3 .00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 75, 76, 91, 92 3. 00 per semester 

Chemistry 21, 22, 25, 26, 51, 52 6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66 7.00 per semester 

Chemistry 81, 82 (travel) 10.00 per semester 

Guarantee Deposit for Student Employment. 5 .00 per semester 

Key deposit for all dormitory rooms . 1 .00 

Deposit on locker in gymnasium 1 .00 

NOTE: A deposit on locker keys is charged to all students en- 
rolling in activity courses in physical education or to those reserv- 
ing lockers in the gymnasium for personal use. 

SUMMER TERM EXPENSES 

Tuition for 9 hours $80 .00 

Less than 9 hours — $9 per hour 

Fees (Health, Activity, Library, etc.) 10.00 

Special fees on course basis 



Bethany College Bulletin 27 

Room for 8 weeks 25 . 00 

Board for 8 weeks (7.50 per week 58 .00 

W. Va. Sales Tax must be collected on room and board. 

Scholarships and other forms of student aid will be available on 
the basis of half the amount granted for a regular semester. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Tuition, room rent, board, student fees, health and matricula- 
tion fees, are due and payable on Registration Day of each sem- 
ester. All accounts are payable to the Bursar of Bethany College. 

Upon request, a period of two weeks after the opening of the 
semester may be allowed for the payment of tuition, room rent, 
board, and fees as listed on the invoice. It is required in each case, 
however, that the student shall make a minimum cash payment of 
$50.00 on Registration Day of each semester. Students are not 
considered to be properly enrolled any semester until this mini- 
mum payment has been made. Scholarship awards do not apply 
on the required minimum payment. In case the student's account 
is less than $50.00, full payment of the same is required in advance. 

All accounts must be paid in full within two weeks after registra- 
tion. 

Arrangements may be made for deferred payment by proper 
application addressed to the Committee on Financial Aids. 

As an associate of the Tuition Plan, Inc., we are prepared to 
extend to parents or guardians the opportunity of paying any bal- 
ance on tuition, board, room rent and other college fees in equal 
monthly installments during the college year. The cost of this 
convenience, which is entirely optional with the parent, is 4% of 
the balance due. Arrangements for this service should be com- 
pleted before Registration Day. Details will be furnished on re- 
quest. 

No student will be allowed to take final examinations or to re- 
ceive academic credit of any kind in any semester until all his 
financial obligations to the college have been met. In case a student 
withdraws from college, all charges except certain special fees are 
pro rated, figured to the end of the week on which the withdrawal 
takes place. Scholarship awards are not applied on the tuition of 
students who withdraw before the end of the semester until all 
other charges have been paid in full. There can be no change in the 
tuition or fees charged a student because of a reduction in credit 
hours in his schedule of courses after the first two weeks of any 
semester. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AIDS 



FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

Honor Scholarships — Scholarships to the amount of $250 are 
awarded to entering freshman students who rank in the highest 
honor group of secondary school graduating class. These provide 
a stipend of $>ioo the freshman year, $75 for the sophomore year, 
and $75 for the junior year. The award will not be continued 
beyond the freshman year if the student fails to maintain an aca- 
demic point average of 1.5. 

Trustee Scholarships — A limited number of scholarships to 
the amount of $175 are available to entering freshmen who rank 
high in secondary school graduating class and who would not be 
able to attend college without such financial help. Such a scholar- 
ship provides a stipend of $75 for the freshman year, $50 for the 
sophomore year, and $50 for the junior year. The award will not 
be continued beyond the freshman year if the student fails to 
maintain an academic point average of 1.25. 

Competitive Scholarships — Early in the spring the college 
holds a competitive examination for high school seniors, and thirty 
scholarships ranging in amount from $600 to $800 are awarded to 
students making high scores on the examination. These awards are 
on the basis of $150 or $200 for each of the four college years. An 
academic point average of 1.5 after the freshman year must be 
maintained in order to have the stipend continued. 

Regional Alumni Scholarships — Ten regional alumni schol- 
arships are to be awarded to freshmen of unusual ability upon 
recommendation of the alumni groups in various districts. These 
scholarships awards are for an amount of $600 applicable on the 
tuition account of the student at the rate of $75 per semester. The 
scholarship may be discontinued at any time the student fails to 
make an academic point average of 1.5 at the end of any one 
semester. 

To be eligible for any one of these awards, the student must 
come from the upper quarter of his high school or preparatory 
school graduating class, he must have demonstrated interest in 
extracurricular activities by active participation, he must be well 
recommended by responsible school officers, and he must have the 
endorsement of Bethany alumni in his area. 



Bethany College Bulletin 29 

Recommendation Scholarships — High school seniors in the 
Pittsburgh area are often recommended for scholarship awards on 
the basis of aptitude tests administered under the sponsorship of 
the Civic Club or the endorsement of the Phi Beta Kappa Associa- 
tion of Pittsburgh. In each case, the final award is in the hands of 
the college administration, but the recommendation or endorse- 
ment is almost always given favorable consideration. Awards to 
students who have such recommendation are usually $150 for each 
of four years. 

General Regulations — All scholarships for freshmen are 
awarded by the Committee on Financial Aid after consultation 
with the Committee on Admissions and the Director of Admis- 
sions. No award will be continued beyond the first semester if the 
student fails to abide by the regulations and ideals of the college. 
The stipends that go with each scholarship award are applied on 
the tuition charge on the basis of one-half for the first semester and 
one-half for the second semester. Applications must be filed with 
the Director of Admissions at least three weeks prior to the date 
of admission to the college. All applications from new students 
must be accompanied by a transcript of secondary school work and 
the required Application for Admission and Admission Fee. 

For students electing the accelerated program, scholarship 
awards will be figured on the same basis for each semester. The 
same requirements as to academic point average will apply for the 
accelerated program. 

Students will be eligible to receive only one award. Students 
qualifying for more than one must select the award which they 
prefer to accept. 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UPPERCLASSMEN 

Trustee Scholarships — Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may 
apply for scholarship awards to the amount of $50 to $150, which 
have been authorized by the Board of Trustees for students above 
the freshman rank who maintain a high grade of academic work 
and who would be unable to continue in college without such 
financial assistance. It is expected that in each case the applicant 
shall have met the following conditions: 

1. His academic record must be above 1.25 average in the aca- 
demic year preceding the application. 



3<d Bethany College Bulletin 

1. His financial obligations to the college must be met promptly. 

3. His influence on the student body should be in every sense 
wholesome. 

4. His continuance in college should depend upon some financial 
assistance. 

5. He shall have made a worthwhile contribution to the life of 
the college and the college program. 

Schlarships of $150 are not usually awarded to students who 
have other forms of financial aid such as student employment. 
Academic standing and accomplishment are the chief criteria for 
scholarship awards. 

It is understood that the following reasons will operate to cancel 
this scholarship for the next semester: 

1. Failure to maintain an academic point average of 1.25. 

2. Serious academic censure for any cause. 

3. Unsatisfactory conduct. 

All applications for scholarship awards from members of the 
student body must be filed with the Committee on Financial Aid 
three weeks before the end of the semester. Applications received 
after that time cannot be acted upon for the next college year. 
When a trustee scholarship is awarded the recipient is asked to 
sign a statement indicating his acknowledgment of an obligation 
and his intent to pay same after graduation. 

Designated Scholarships — The following scholarships have 
been especially designated by friends of the college and are subject 
to such special provisions as are mentioned: 

Mary A. Morrison Scholarship — This is a scholarship cover- 
ing three-fourths of the cost of tuition. 

Isaacs Mills Scholarship — This scholarship covers a part of 
the tuition charge, the benefits of which are to be received by 
a ministerial student. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship — This scholarship of $100 per 
semester applies on tuition. The student receiving the benefits of 
the same is to be nominated by a member of the Willett family. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship — This scholarship covers $30 on 
tuition cost per semester. 

Albert C. Israel Scholarship — This scholarship yields $20 
per semester to apply on tuition of a descendant of Albert C. Israel. 



Bethany College Bulletin 31 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship — The income from this scholar- 
ship fund is awarded for the purpose of helping students who are 
preparing for the mission field or the ministry. The students who 
receive the benefits of this scholarship are to be nominated by the 
donor. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship — The income from this scholarship 
fund is awarded to students who have reached the senior year 
in their college course. The students receiving benefits from this 
scholarship are to be nominated by the Committee on Student Aid 
after consultation with the donor. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship — A scholarship endowed in 
memory of Mr. Herbert Moninger, a graduate of the college. 

Josiah Wilson Scholarship — As a memorial to Josiah N. and 
Wilmina S. Wilson and Nora B. Wilson a scholarship fund was 
established by Josiah N. Wilson. The income is used to aid some 
student or students who are preparing for the Christian ministry. 
M. M. Cochran Scholarships — Several scholarships covering 
a part of the tuition charge. The students who receive the benefits 
of these scholarships are to be nominated by the President of the 
college. 

Students getting designated scholarships must meet the same 
general requirements as for Trustee Scholarships but they are not 
expected to sign a statement indicating intent to repay the amount 
of the award. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Awards — The income from a fund of 
$8,000 set up by the will of Mrs. Minnie W. Schaefer of Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio to be awarded to students planning for definite 
Christian service. 

J. T. Smith Awards — The income from a fund of $17,500 es- 
tablished by J. T. Smith of Memphis, Tennessee, to be made avail- 
able for students preparing for the Christian ministry or some 
other form of Christian service. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship Fund — The in- 
come from a fund of $20,000 set up by the will of Clarinda Pendle- 
ton Lamar, in memory of her father, William Kimbrough Pendle- 
ton, member of the first faculty and second president of the college 
(1 866-1 889), is to be awarded in one or more scholarships each 
year to one or more citizens of West Virginia. These awards may 
be in the form of loans or outright gifts as determined by the 
faculty of Bethany College. 



32 Bethany College Bulletin 

The Gans Scholarships — Awards are made in this fund to 
juniors and seniors at Bethany College and to graduates of Beth- 
any College studying elsewhere who have shown "evidence of 
merit and promise in the field of science. ,> Funds so awarded will 
be available for approved study and research in some specific field. 

Rhodes Scholarships — Men who have completed their sopho- 
more year at Bethany College are eligible to compete for the Cecil 
Rhodes Scholarship, tenable for three years at Oxford University, 
England, with a stipend of $1,500 each year. These scholarships 
are awarded on the combined basis of character, scholarship, 
athletic ability, and leadership in extra-curricular activities. Fur- 
ther information may be obtained from the Dean of Students. 
These scholarships were suspended for the duration of the war in 
Europe. The committee has announced its intention of re-estab- 
lishing competitive procedures for the same at the earliest possible 
date. 

Foreign Exchange Fellowships — Through the Institute of 
International Education Bethany College has in past years been 
able to place graduates in foreign universities for graduate study. 
The State Department of the United States Government has re- 
cently suspended this privilege for the duration of the war. 

Each year at least two students from foreign countries come to 
Bethany to study on fellowships provided by the college adminis- 
tration. These students come to interpret their own people and 
their national culture to American student life. These awards are 
made only to students who are recommended by the Institute of 
International Education. 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

Bethany College Loan Funds — Loans from the Bethany 
College Funds may be obtained by students on complying with 
the conditions governing the same. Approved security is required 
from all those borrowing from the fund. These loans are without 
interest while the student is in Bethany College and notes are 
drawn to mature four months after graduation or withdrawal from 
college. All notes bear interest from the date of their maturity. 

Applications for loans must be made to the Committee on Fi- 
nancial Aid through the Executive Secretary. All financial obliga- 
tions to the college including the loan fund must be paid before an 
official transcript of the student's academic record can be issued. 



Bethany College Bulletin 33 

Student Employment — Limited opportunities for students to 
earn money for college expenses are afforded, but under no cir- 
cumstances it it possible for a student to earn all of his expenses. 
The college may not be able to provide student employment of any 
kind beyond $ 100 as a total for one year. 

Applications for student employment must be filed on a proper 
form and must be accompanied by a deposit of $5.00 as a guaran- 
tee of faithful performance. A careful study of the student's needs 
and general welfare will be made by the committee caring for 
student employment as each application is considered. Applica- 
tions for student employment should be filed with the Executive 
Secretary. 

Prospective students should not consider beginning a college 
career unless adequate financial arrangements have been made for 
at least the first year. A few students may find it possible to earn 
enough money to pay part of their expenses. It is advisable, how- 
ever, for new students to adapt themselves academically before 
attempting outside work. 

Summer Term — Scholarships and other forms of student aid 
will be available on the basis of half the amount granted for a 
regular semester. 

PLACEMENT 

The Admissions and Personnel Office is concerned with place- 
ment service and its facilities are available for students and pro- 
spective employers. It assists students needing to secure part-time 
employment while attending college and those who need to find 
summer work; it helps members of the graduating class who are 
seeking their first positions or making applications for graduate 
fellowships; and it gives as much assistance as possible to alumni 
who keep in touch with the office. The office does not undertake 
to find employment for anyone or to assume the responsibility for 
making all contacts with prospective employers. 



GRADUATION AND HONORS 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Degrees — Bethany College confers at graduation the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

Requirement of Hours — Candidates for either of the bacca- 
laureate degrees are required to complete a total of 128 semester 
hours for graduation. Of this number forty semester hours must 
be in courses in the upper division; six semester hours must be 
in physical education, and two semester hours must represent the 
freshman course in orientation or its equivalent. Only twelve hours 
in applied music can be used toward meeting the minimum re- 
quirement. 

Distribution Requirement — Candidates for graduation are 
required to complete certain course work in each of the five cur- 
ricular groups. The following prescription of course requirements 
must be met by all candidates for baccalaureate degrees: 

Freshman Orientation 2 hrs. 

Group I — Languages and Literature 

English composition or literature 6 hrs. 

The requirement in English composition and litera- 
ture may be met by taking courses under the head- 
ing of composition or English 31-32 in the literature 
division on the basis of superior rank in the English 
placement test. 

Foreign language — 

A reading knowledge of one of the foreign languages 
offered at the college or approved by the Committee 
on Admissions. This requirement may be satisfied 
by the completion of the second year course in the 
language at the college level; or by written and oral 
examination given under the direction of the De- 
partment of Modern Languages or the Department 
of Classics. 
Group II — Psychology and Education 

Psychology and Education 6 hrs. 

Physical Education, i.e. two hours in personal hygiene 

and four hours in activity courses 6 hrs. 



Bethany College Bulletin 35 

Group III — Social studies 

History, Political Science, Economics, or Sociology 6 hrs. 

Group IV — Science and Mathematics 

Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics 6 hrs. 

Group V — Religion, Philosophy and Fine Arts 

Biblical literature, i.e., courses in Old and New Testa- 
ment 6 hrs. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must present at 
least forty semester hours from courses in Group IV. Of these 
forty semester hours, at least twenty-five of them must be in the 
upper division. 

All students will be required to pass a swimming achievement 
test prior to graduation. 

Requirement of Quality Points — Quality points awarded on 
the basis of final grades received are required for graduation. At 
least 128 quality points must be earned and of these at least forty 
must be earned in upper division courses. 

Requirement of Major — The department in which a student 
elects to major shall determine specific requirements for the stu- 
dent, not only of work to be done in the major department but cer- 
tain other work to be done in other departments that must be com- 
pleted to buttress the major. The general outline of requirements 
for each major is listed in the section of this bulletin that carries 
courses of instruction. With the approval of the Dean of the Fac- 
ulty certain modifications can be made to meet the needs of the 
individual student. 

It is expected that no major will include less than 24 semester 
hours and that at least 12 semester hours must be completed in 
courses definitely in the upper division. At least 24 quality points 
must be earned in the major field. These represent the minimum 
for the college. The department offering the major may require 
more than this minimum. In all cases the counselor will expect the 
student to complete a large part of his major work in the upper 
division. 

The major may be confined to the work of a single department, 
or related departments may offer "functional majors" embracing 
work in two departments, if the work is planned and administered 
as a homogeneous unit. 

Requirement of Minor — In addition to the major each stu- 
dent must elect a minor subject. The professor in charge of the 



36 Bethany College Bulletin 

major subject should approve the minor selected. In most cases it 
should have some relationship to the major. At least 18 semester 
hours must be completed in the minor. A minimum of 18 quality 
points is required in the minor. 

Requirement of Examination — A comprehensive examina- 
tion — both written and oral — is required of each candidate for a 
degree at Bethany College. This examination is given by a faculty 
committee under the direction of the professor in charge of the 
major subject, and it is intended to cover the total range of mate- 
rial and accomplishment for an undergraduate major. A student 
failing in the comprehensive examination shall be considered as 
failing to meet the requirements for graduation and shall not be 
graduated. 

Seniors who pass the comprehensive examination with high 
credit shall be awarded their degrees "with distinction" in the 
major subject. The only other grades given are "passed" and 
"failed." 

Seniors who fail to pass the comprehensive examination shall 
upon payment of a suitable fee, be given a second opportunity only 
at the end of any subsequent semester, provided reasonable notice 
has been given to the Committee on Admissions and Classifica- 
tions and the department head. Further opportunity to take this 
examination shall be given only by special vote of the faculty. 

Residence Requirement — Eight semesters are usually re- 
quired to satisfy the requirements for the baccalaureate degree. 
Students of superior quality may satisfy the requirements in less 
time. The senior year should be spent in residence at the college. 

HONORS 

Graduation Honors — Students who have done college work 
of unusual merit and have given evidence of superior academic 
achievement in the upper division will be graduated with honors. 
These are awarded with the degree as Summa Cum Laude, Magna 
Cum Laude, and Cum Laude. 

Seniors who give evidence of superior achievement in the major 
subject and are able to pass the comprehensive examination with 
excellent results will be designated as "Passed with Distinction." 

Class Honors — Upper division students of the college who 
complete the academic work of any one year with a point average 



Bethany College Bulletin 37 

of 2.5 are recognized for "First Honors" for the year, and those 
who complete the academic work of any one year with a point 
average of 2.25 are recognized for "Second Honors" for the year. 
Lower division students of the college who complete the academic 
work of any one year with a point average of 2.25 are recognized 
for "First Honors" for the year, and those who complete the aca- 
demic work of any one year with a point average of 2.0 are recog- 
nized for "Second Honors" for the year. 

Deans' List — At the end of each semester a list of students who 
have ranked high in academic attainments as attested by academic 
points average are designated for the Deans' List. 

Senior Fellowships — Upon careful recommendation certain 
members of the junior class are designated as Senior Fellows dur- 
ing the following year. The selection is made only of students who 
have attained unusual excellence in the field of their major study 
and who by character and ability can do special work in a major 
department, as an assistant in some phase of instruction or re- 
search. The Senior Fellowship carries a small stipend. Not more 
than six senior fellowships are awarded in any one year. 

The selection of Senior Fellows is made from the nominations 
of department heads. It is intended that each Senior Fellow shall 
be given the fullest freedom in his intellectual pursuits and that 
he shall have the benefit of tutorial instruction in the department 
in which he works. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa — This honorary scholastic fraternity was 
organized at Bethany College in 1932. Students are eligible for 
membership under the following conditions: maintenance of a 
quality point average of 2.25 for five consecutive semesters, pro- 
vided that in no semester their quality point average falls below an 
average of 2, and, further, students must be recommended by the 
faculty Committee on Honors. 

Pi Gamma Mu — The West Virginia Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma 
Mu is located at Bethany. Its members are selected from students 
who have maintained a high average grade in at least twenty 
semester hours of social studies. 

Anna Ruth Bourne Award — A cup has been given the College 
by an anonymous donor to be known as the Anna Ruth Bourne 
Scholarship cup. The cup is awarded to the sorority or non-sorority 
group on the campus earning the highest scholarship standing each 



38 Bethany College Bulletin 

semester. The group winning the large cup for four consecutive 
semesters is presented with a smaller cup which is a replica of the 
large cup. 

Pittsburgh College Club Award — The Pittsburgh College 
Club, which comprises the college alumnae of Pittsburgh, has set 
up an award which is made each year to the outstanding girl in the 
junior class. This award is based on academic record, qualities of 
leadership, character, conduct, and general standing on the cam- 
pus. The club has placed a suitable plaque in Phillips Hall on 
which the names of the winners are engraved. In addition, an in- 
dividual award is made each year to the junior girl chosen. 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



INSTRUCTION 

The dominant tone in the instructional activities at Bethany 
College is an emphasis upon the common adventure of students 
and instructors in learning and living. The whole college experience 
is interwoven with opportunities for exchanging ideas, for giving 
and absorbing inspiration, and for all kinds of cordial faculty- 
student relationships. The student is encouraged to find and 
further himself in the intellectual life and, with the help of faculty 
counselors, to use all of the college resources in terms of valid 
educational objectives. 

The instructional and guidance plan of the college makes it pos- 
sible to treat students as individuals with differences in experience, 
attitudes, and interests. During the first two years, there are fre- 
quent individual conferences for the student with his counselor 
on the progress in courses, projects of study undertaken, and total 
adjustment in academic, vocational, and social matters. During 
the last two years of the college experience independent work 
and self-propelled study are given greater consideration. The Aca- 
demic Council and the Dean of the Faculty give direction and 
supervision to the instructional program of the college. 

LOWER DIVISION 

The college curriculum and general plan of instruction recognize 
a lower division and an upper division. The lower division repre- 
sents the traditional freshman and sophomore years, and the upper 
division the traditional junior and senior years. These divisions 
reflect the progress and educational growth that is expected of 
students as well as the differences in instructional procedure and 
purpose of the curriculum at the two levels. 

The work of the lower division is intended to complete what is 
usually termed a "general education" and it represents the under- 
girding of the student's cultural and academic experience. It is 
based on the belief that the student should become familiar with 
different fields of knowledge and that the program of general 
education offered in higher institutions should be essentially a con- 
tinuation, on a higher level, of academic work in the secondary 
school. Students are urged to elect widely in the instructional de- 



40 Bethany College Bulletin 

partments of the college. Every major department has survey 
courses for the lower division students. A general survey examina- 
tion is given at the end of the lower division work. The individual 
profiles from this examination are used for educational guidance. 
This examination is given in cooperation with the program of the 
Committee on Measurement and Guidance of the American Coun- 
cil on Education. 

UPPER DIVISION 

In the upper division all students work directly under the pro- 
fessor in charge of the major subject. The teaching procedures and 
materials give emphasis to individual initiative and concentrated 
work. As far as possible the student's work is library-and-labora- 
tory centered. Extensive reading, problems, and seminars are regu- 
lar procedures in upper division instruction. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Near the end of the senior year, as a final prerequisite to the 
degree, each student is required to pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion — written and oral — in his major subject; this examination 
tests the accomplishments of the student in the whole range of the 
major. A reading period of two weeks is set aside each year for all 
seniors to make a final review of materials before the examination 
dates. Candidates for degrees are expected, however, to use the 
entire senior year in making a review and synthesis of their major 
work. 

STUDENT GUIDANCE 

From the beginning of his college career each student has an 
individual faculty counselor. After the freshman year the counselor 
is normally a faculty member in the field in which the student is 
doing his major work. The student has unusual opportunities to be 
in frequent contact with his counselor, and reports of accomplish- 
ment and difficulties can be made directly to him. The student- 
counselor relationship, including in its range the student's entire 
personal and educational development, occupies a significant place 
in the college plan at Bethany. So far as possible it replaces general 
faculty regulations with an individualized program aiming at con- 
tinuity, correlation and integration of work. These counselors, 
while ministering to all the needs of the student, have as their most 



Bethany College Bulletin 41 

important function the interpretation and presentation of sound 
educational objectives. 

The counselor is concerned with the student's selection of 
courses, his academic progress, standards of conduct, vocational 
plans and objectives, recreational and social expression. It is hoped 
that in personal counseling with faculty members there may be 
implanted in the student a vivid notion of definite and feasible 
goals toward which he can shape his course and an appreciation 
of the ideals of scholarship and character that belong to the best 
traditions of the academic world. 

The chief officer in charge of student welfare, student guidance, 
and the coordination of all personnel administration is the Dean of 
Students. 



OCCUPATIONAL PREPARATION 



The predominant idea in the curriculum at Bethany College is 
to provide sound instruction in the liberal arts and sciences. 
Moreover, by proper selection of courses a student can prepare for 
various vocational or professional purposes. 

GENERAL PROGRAM 

First Year. In most cases the general requirements for the 
freshman year will fit into the later educational and vocational 
plans for students. Most freshmen should plan to enroll for courses 
about as follows for each semester of the first year. 

English composition or literature 3 hrs. 

Foreign language 3 hrs. 

French, German, Spanish, Greek, Latin 

Introduction to Social Science 3 hrs. 

Orientation 1 1-12 1 hr. 

Physical Education 1 hr. 

Electives 6 hrs. to 9 hrs. 

Deviations from this program can be made with the advice and 
consent of the faculty counselor because each student is recognized 
as an individual whose training in the past and whose plans for the 
future may differentiate him from his fellows. 

Second Year. All students are strongly urged to complete the 
general course requirements for graduation by the end of the 
second year in college. The major field must be selected by the end 
of the sophomore year and the foreign language requirement 
should be satisfied. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Certain suggested curricula have been set up which are so 
planned that they meet the requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree and at the same time serve genuine vocational objectives. 
Under the guidance of certain heads of departments and desig- 
nated members of the faculty, it is possible for students to prepare 
for the pursuit of certain vocations. Following are listed the various 
fields as well as the advisers in each of these fields. For more de- 
tailed information on these special programs the student is referred 
to Pages 59 to 65 of the Bethany College Catalogue for 1 944-1 945. 



Bethany College Bulletin 43 

Business Administration Mr. Gildersleeve 

Business Training for Women 

Miss Eley or Miss Hoagland 

Secretarial Training Miss Eley 

Social Work . . . Mr. Paustian 

Law. (Pre-Law) Mr. Woolery 

Public Service Mr. Woolery 

Medicine (Pre-medical) Mr. Weimer 

Dentistry (Pre-dental) Mr. Weimer 

Medical Technology Mr. Weimer 

Professional Chemistry Mr. Bennett 

Christian Ministry Mr. Stevenson 

Journalism Mr. Roberts 

Teaching (High School and Elementary) . . .Mr. Eliassen 

Librarianship Mr. Behymer 

Personnel Administration Mr. Kirkpatrick 

Public School Music Mr. Carter 

Engineering and Electronics. Engineering students are able 
to pursue a course of study at Bethany which will be acceptable 
for the first two years of engineering at an engineering school. 
Recent developments at the college since the publication of the 
1 944-1 945 Bethany College Catalogue have made it possible to 
offer as a sequence in the Physics Department certain courses in 
electronics. Students interested in this field should consult Pro- 
fessor Allen. 

Nursing. By recent action of the faculty, taken since the publi- 
cation of the 1 944-1 945 Bethany College Catalogue, students in- 
terested in nursing may pursue a program of courses at Bethany 
College for three years. On the satisfactory completion of one year 
in an approved nursing school, the college will grant the B.S. 
degree. The degree in nursing will be awarded by the school of 
nursing, in addition, upon the completion of the course in nursing 
at the approved school. Students interested in this field should 
consult Dean Weimer. 

Personnel Administration. Personnel work is a relatively new 
profession, born of the needs of modern life. It calls for persons 
qualified — by training, experience, and character — to bring into a 
practical world an understanding of the importance of human rela- 
tions. 



44 Bethany College Bulletin 

It is recommended that those who are planning to work toward 
a career in Personnel work in business and industry should major 
in Economics and Business Administration. Those who plan to 
enter personnel or guidance work in schools should major in some 
teaching subject. Students should plan their entire academic work 
in consultation with appropriate faculty adviser. 

Graduate Study. Since Bethany College is fully accredited and 
is on the approved list of the Association of American Universities, 
graduates of the college are admitted to the graduate school of any 
university. By the proper selection of undergraduate courses, to- 
gether with the establishment of scholarly habits of work, such 
graduates should be able to pursue advanced study without diffi- 
culty. Opportunity is given for students to take The Graduate 
Record Examination at Bethany. 

Those working for the master's degree should be able to com- 
plete the full requirements in the minimum time required by the 
specific graduate school. For example, a student who has majored 
in economics and business administration at Bethany with proper 
selection of courses, will be able to complete the requirements for 
the master's degree at Wharton School of Finance and Commerce 
of the University of Pennsylvania in one year. About the same 
situation applies for graduate study in any of the fields in which 
Bethany College offers a major. Students who are planning to do 
graduate study are urged to counsel carefully with the head of the 
Bethany department related to their proposed field of study. Only 
students of marked intellectual ability and industry are urged to 
consider graduate study. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Group I — Languages and Literature 

Classics Speech and Dramatics 

Greek Journalism 

Latin Modern Languages 
English French 

Composition German 

Literature Spanish 

Group II — Psychology and Education 

Education Psychology 

Personnel Administration Physical Education 

Group III — Social Studies 

Economics and Business Ad- Political Science 

ministration Library Science 

History and Political Science Secretarial Training 

European History Social Science 

American History Sociology 

Group IV — Science and Mathematics 

Biology Mathematics and Physics 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Geography and Geology Physics 

Group V — Religion, Philosophy and Fine Arts 

Religion and Philosophy Music 

Bible Literature and Theory of 

Church History Music 

Religious Education and Applied Music 
Homiletics Art Appreciation 

Philosophy 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 

Courses of instruction are listed by departments. The 
various departments are arranged according to groups of 
related departments. 

In numbering of courses first semester courses have odd 
numbers and second semester courses, even numbers. A 
course having both an odd and even number, as 1 1-12, runs 
continuously throughout the year, but may be elected for 
either semester unless the course is specifically designated 
"A continuous course," providing the proper prerequisites 
are met. In registering for a course through the year, the 
odd number is used the first semester, and the even, the 
second semester. 

The number in parentheses after the name of the course 
indicates the academic credit given for each semester. The 
names of the instructors follow the description of the 
course. 

The curriculum of the college recognizes the lower and 
upper divisions in the arrangement of courses and the num- 
bers of each course. The lower division covers, roughly, 
the freshman and sophomore years and the upper division, 
the junior and senior years. Courses in the lower division 
are numbered from 1 1 to 49, and in the upper division from 
50 to 92. 

During the period when the college is operating on three 
semesters courses may be offered in any one of the semes- 
ters regardless of the number used. In some cases the same 
course may be offered in all three semesters. It is necessary 
to consult the offerings of the college for each semester to 
determine the courses to be offered at that time. 

A course may not be offered, if elected by less than five 
students. 



FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 
ii. College Orientation, (i hr.) 

Lectures and readings related to the adjustment of the student to the college experience. 
Methods of intelligent self-directed study; development of social personality; use of books 
and college resources. Required of all freshmen. 

12. Vocational Orientation, (i hr.) 

Survey of certain broad occupational fields; aimed toward a better understanding of the 
world of work and the opportunities in it. Methods for self-appraisal and self-guidance; 
papers and required readings on occupational information. Required of all freshmen. 

NAVAL ORGANIZATION 

17. Naval Organization, (i hr.) 

Required of all V-12 students during their first term in the program. 

Lieutenant Northrup 

18. Naval Organization, (i hr.) 

Required of all V-12 students during their second term in the program. 

Lieutenant Northrup 



GROUP I— LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



CLASSICS 
F. R. Gay, Head of the Department 
Aims: 

To develop the ability (a) to read classical Greek and Latin literature with some 
degree of fluency and appreciation; (b) to understand the influence of Greek and Latin 
on modern thought and expression; (c) to prepare students for the teaching of Latin, 
ministerial students for the study of the New Testament; and (d) to provide back- 
ground materials for the student who is interested in linguistics or archaeology. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours in the department with a sequence of twenty hours in either Greek 
or Latin. Each major student must undertake some minor research in either Greek or 
Latin in the problems course. (Classics 91-92.) Students who expect to teach Latin 
will find Greek very important in their undergraduate courses and practically indis- 
pensable for any graduate study of this language. History 6$> English 33-34, English 
53-54, Philosophy 61-62, and Art Appreciation 31-32 are strongly recommended for 
all students majoring in this department. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours are required for a minor. The sequence of courses must be approved 
by the head of the department. History 65 is recommended. 

Greek 
11-12. Elementary. (3 hrs.) 

The essentials of Attic Greek grammar, and the reading of selections from classical Greek 
literature. 

Mr. Gay 

51. Xenophon. (3 hrs.) 

The Anabasis, Prerequisite, Greek 11-12. 

Mr. Gay 

52. Plato. (3 hrs.) 

Apology and Crito. Prerequisite, Greek 11-12. 

Mr. Gay 
53-54. Greek Tragedy. (3 hrs.) 

Selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Prerequisite, Greek 11-12. 

Mr. Gay 



y 



Bethany College Bulletin 49 

73-74. New Testament Greek. (3 hrs.) 

The Gospel of Luke and the grammar of the Greek New Testament. In the second semester 
some Pauline Epistles will be studied. Prerequisite, Greek 52 or 54. 

Mr. Green 
Latin 
31-32. Vergil's Aeneid. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, two units of Latin from a secondary school. A continuous course. 

Mr. Gay 
51. Cicero's De Amicitia and De Senectute. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Latin 31-32 or equivalent. 



52. Tacitus. (3 hrs.) 

Germania and Agricola. Prerequisite, Latin 51. 

$3. Cicero's Letters. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Latin 31-32. 

54. Horace. (3 hrs.) 

Odes and Epodes. Prerequisite, Latin 31-32. 

61. Livy. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Latin 51-52 or 53-54. 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 



Mr. Gay 

62. Plautus and Terence. (3 hrs.) 

The Menaechmi of Plautus and the Phormio of Terence will be critically studied. Pre- 
requisite, Latin 61. 

Mr. Gay 
63-64. Latin Composition. (2 hrs.) 

A course in the writing of Latin especially intended for students who expect to teach the 
subject. Prerequisite, Latin 51-52 or 53-54. 

Mr. Gay 

85. Teaching of Latin. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 



50 Bethany College Bulletin 

91-92. Problems in Classics. 

Subjects, hours, and credits for special study in the classics to be arranged individually 
with the instructor. 

Mr. Gay 

ENGLISH 

Florence M. Hoagland, Head of the Department 

E. E. Roberts, Professor 

Margaret Carrigan, Assistant Professor 

Blandina Foster, Instructor 

Aims: 

Instruction in this department is intended (a) to prepare all students for a more in- 
telligent and appreciative reading of the materials in all branches of knowledge; 
(b) to furnish students with a comprehensive knowledge of the English language and 
literature in preparation for creative writing, graduate study, or as a cultural dis- 
cipline; (c) to provide background and some technical training for students preparing 
for professional writing or journalism, and (d) to train students to speak effectively 
in public. 

Requirement for Major: 

I. Sequence of courses for students who plan to teach English, to prepare for graduate 
study, or to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of the English language and litera- 
ture: English 31-32 and twelve hours in courses numbered above 54 to be approved 
by the head of the department according to the individual needs of the student. 
A minimum of twenty-four hours in literature courses is required for a major. Either 
French or German should be elected to meet the foreign language requirement for 
graduation. History 70 and Philosophy 53-54 are recommended. 

II. Sequence of courses for students who plan to prepare for journalism, professional 
writing, graduate study, or teaching in journalism: Journalism 53-54 and twelve 
semester hours in journalism courses. English 31-32 must be included and six hours 
in the courses numbered above 54. A minimum of twenty-four hours is required for a 
major. 

Requirement for Minor: 

For students electing a minor under sequence I, at least eighteen hours in the division 
of literature of which six must be in courses numbered above 54. English 31-32 must 
be included. 

For students electing a minor under sequence II, at least twelve hours in Journalism 
and English 31-32. 

For students electing a minor in Speech and Dramatics, at least eighteen hours in the 
division. English 31-32 must be included and English 57-58 are recommended. 



Bethany College Bulletin 51 

Composition 
11-12. Composition and Literature. (3 hrs.) 

First semester: emphasis on fundamentals of composition with writing in various forms. 
Review of grammar. Second semester: greater emphasis on content and style in composition 
and instruction in the technique of preparing a research paper. Vocabulary study. 

Members of the Staff 
Literature 

With the exception of English 31-32, the courses in literature are offered in alternate 
years. 

31-32. English Literature and Its Background. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the masterpieces of English poetry and prose, together with specimens of foreign 
works by which they have been influenced. 

Miss Hoagland 
33-34. Greek Mythology in English Literature, (i hr.) 

No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. The purpose of the course is to furnish 
a background of classical mythology necessary for the interpretation of the English poets. 

Mr. Gay 

51. American Literature to 1900. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of American literature as an aspect of American culture, as a development of 
thought in America, and in relation to the life and literature of the western world. Special 
emphasis on Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Whitman, and Mark Twain. 

Mr. Gay 

53-54. European Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A reading of some of the most important masterpieces of Greek, Roman, and European 
literature in translation, with a comparison of authors and ideas, and with reference to 
influences on modern thought. Prerequisite, six semester hours in English literature. 

Mr. Gay 

SS- Growth and Structure of the English Language. (3 
hrs.) 

The course will deal historically with the language, its early grammar, its foreign borrow- 
ings. Readings from the poetry and prose of the Old English period. 

Miss Hoagland 
$6. Chaucer and Middle English. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of Middle English literature. Special study of the Canterbury Tales and some of 
the minor poems which reveal the development of Chaucer's skill. 

Miss Hoagland 



52 Bethany College Bulletin 

57-58. Shakespeare. (3 hrs.) 

Principal plays of Shakespeare. Four plays will be studied closely each semester; nine or 
ten others will be read more rapidly. 

Miss Hoagland 

59. The Renaissance. (3 hrs.) 

Non-dramatic literature of the English Renaissance will be studied; special emphasis on 
Spenser. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Carrigan 

60. The Seventeenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

From Donne and the metaphysical poets through the age of Dryden. Prose and poetry 
will be studied, special emphasis on Milton. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Carrigan 
61-62. The Eighteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Interpretation of the literature and social life of the eighteenth century. Emphasis on 
Defoe, Steele and Addison, Pope, Swift, Johnson and his circle. Drama: Congreve through 
Sheridan. Poetry: Collins and Gray through Blake. Novels: Selected from Richardson 
Fielding, Sterne, and Jane Austen. 

Miss Hoagland 
64. The Romantic Period. (3 hrs.) 

The poetry of the romantic movement from 1785 to 1832. Emphasis on Coleridge, Words- 
worth, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Hoagland 
6$-66. Victorian Literature. (3 hrs.) 

The poetry and prose of the Victorian age with emphasis on Carlyle, Browning, and 
Tennyson in the first semester. A study of Arnold, Morris, Swinburne, and Hardy in the 
second semester. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Carrigan 
70-71. Contemporary Literature. (3 hrs.) 

Poetry, novel, and drama. Drama from Ibsen to Odets; poetry from Bridges to MacLeish; 
novel from James to Cather. Prerequisite, six semester hours in English literature, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Miss Hoagland 
86. Teaching of English. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 86. 

87-88. Seminar in English Literature, (i hr.) 

A course for advanced students majoring in English. A correlating and supplementing of 
the work done in previous courses. Extensive reading. 

Miss Hoagland 



Bethany College Bulletin 53 

91-92. Problems in Literature, (i hr.) 

Conferences, papers, and reports on minor research problems. Limited to seniors of superior 
achievement who are majoring in English. 

Miss Hoagland 

Speech and Dramatics 

41. Fundamentals of Speech. (3 hrs.) 

The fundamentals of speech, including tone production and control, platform presence, 
organization of material, and some work in the delivery of extemporaneous speeches. 

Miss Foster 

42. Public Speaking and Debate. (3 hrs.) 

The practical application of the principles of speech. Prerequisite, Speech 41 or permission 
of the instructor. Enrollment limited to twenty students. 

Miss Foster 

50. Oral Interpretation. (3 hrs.) 

Consideration of such forms as monologues, stories, ballads, lyrics, and dramatic poems. 
Principles of analysis, empathy, attention, imagery. 

Miss Foster 

51. Speech Correction, (i hr.) 

Organic and functional causes of speech difficulties. For those who need it. 

Miss Foster 

52. Argument. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles of logic and psychology which underlie the art of persuasion, 
followed by practice in application of the theories developed. Prerequisite, Speech and 
Dramatics 41, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to twenty students. Not 
offered in 1 945-1 946. 

Mr. Booth 
53-54. Play Production. (2 hrs.) 

To promote an understanding and appreciation of the theatre from the point of view of the 
actor, director, technician, and audience. Practical work in stagecraft, movement, makeup, 
pantomime, etc. Four hours of laboratory. 

Miss Foster 
5S~5^- Theatre Arts from Athens to Broadway, (i hr.) 

An exposition of the continuity of theatrical development. Outside reading of biographies 
and critical reviews. Critical study of current plays, historical trends, and production 
problems. 

Miss Foster 



Miss Foster 



Miss Foster 



54 Bethany College Bulletin 

57-58. Shakespeare. (3 hrs.) 

See English 57-58. 

59-60. Introduction to Radio Speech. (2 hrs.) 

Practice in radio speaking and dramatics. Preparation of scripts. 

61. Radio Speech Practice, (i hr.) 

Two hours of laboratory. 

6l. CONGREVE THROUGH SHERIDAN. (3 hrs.) 
See English 61. 

70-71. Ibsen through Odets. (3 hrs.) 

See English 70-71. 

72. Play Writing. (3 hrs.) 

See Journalism 72. 

Journalism 

Students in Journalism must have access to typewriters. Arrangements for renting them 
can be made through the business office of the college. 

^2- Reporting. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the techniques and values in news reporting. Emphasis upon learning to write 
clearly, forcefully, and distinctively. 

Mr. Roberts 
54. Journalistic Types. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the essay, satire, short story, feature, biography, and magazine article, with 
written work concentrated upon one type to be selected by the student. 

Mr. Roberts 

63. Features. (3 hrs.) 

The writing of twenty special features for magazines and trade journals, and the submission 
of at least ten articles for publication. 

Mr. Roberts 

64. Advanced Features. (3 hrs.) 

The writing of twenty features which must be approved and submitted for publication. 

Mr. Roberts 
6$. Advertising. (3 hrs.) 

A study of department store, financial and business advertising programs, buying motives, 
sales appeals, copywriting, layout, and direct mail. 

Mr. Roberts 



Bethany College Bulletin 55 

66. History of American Journalism. (3 hrs.) 

Journalistic backgrounds followed by a development of American newspapers and maga- 
zines from colonial days to the present. A parallel study of the rise of advertising. Present 
day trends of news dissemination. 

Mr. Roberts 



71. Short Story. (3 hrs.) 

A study of short story types and the writing of ten short stories. 

72. Play Writing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of modern plays and the writing of eight one act plays. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Advanced writing courses in the field of greatest student interest. 



Mr. Roberts 



Mr. Roberts 



Mr. Roberts 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

Pearl Mahaffey, Head of the Department 

Earl D. McKenzie, Assistant Professor 

Margaret R. Woods, Instructor 

Aims: 

The aim of the department is (a) to introduce students to the language, literature and 
culture of France, Germany, and the Spanish speaking countries; (b) to provide train- 
ing in reading facility for students who may be interested in scientific or historical 
study requiring the language as a "tool subject"; and (c) to give adequate training in 
language, literature and expression to students who are preparing to be teachers, 
translators, or representatives in foreign service. 

Requirement for a Major in French: 

Twenty-four hours in French, above French 11-12, with eighteen hours in the upper 
division. French 65-66 is required and English 33-34. To be recommended to teach 
any of the modern foreign languages the student must have completed French 85. 

Requirement for a Minor in French, German, or Spanish: 

At least eighteen hours in the same language. 

French 
11-12. First Year French. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, reading and composition. Emphasis on reading. 
For students who have no acquaintance with the language. 

Miss Mahaffey 



$6 Bethany College Bulletin 

31-32. Intermediate French. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar review, composition, dictation, intensive and extensive reading. Prerequisite, 
French 12, 2 years in High School, or passing an achievement test. 

Miss Mahaffey 
51-52. Conversation. (2 hrs.) 

A study of prose composition, syntax, and phonetics. Dictation and conversation. Pre- 
requisite, French 31-32. 

Miss Mahaffey 
SS~S^- Modern Drama. (3 hrs.) 

French Drama since 17th Century. Prerequisite, a reading knowledge of French. Con- 
ducted in French. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Miss Mahaffey 
61-62. Novel. (3 hrs.) 

The French Novel from its beginning to the 20th century. Prerequisite, a reading knowl- 
edge of French. Conducted in French. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. McKenzie 
6^-66. Survey of French Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of French literature from the early periods to the present time. 

Miss Mahaffey 

71. Seventeenth Century Drama. (3 hrs.) 

Plays of Corneille, Racine and Mol^iere. Conducted in French. 

Mr. McKenzie 

72. Nineteenth Century Poetry. (3 hrs.) 

Schools of poetry, Romanticism, Parnassian and Symbolism. Conducted in French. 

Mr. McKenzie 
82. Seminar for Major Students. (2 hrs.) 

Intensive review of French civilization and culture. Readings and discussions in French. 

Miss Mahaffey 
85. Teaching of Modern Languages. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

German 
11-12. First Year German. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of grammar, composition and reading with emphasis on reading and speak- 
ing. For students who have no acquaintance with the language. 

Mr. McKenzie 



Bethany College Bulletin 57 

31-32. Intermediate German. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar composition, intensive and extensive reading. Special emphasis on outside read- 
ing in student's major or minor field. Prerequisite, German 12 or satisfactory standing in 
achievement test. 

Mr. McKenzie 
51-52. Conversation. (2 hrs.) 

Practical conversation, study of syntax, dictation. Admission on approval of instructor. 

Mr. McKenzie 

57-58. Nineteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Reading and critical study of the nineteenth century, especially Kleist,Hebbel, and Keller- 
Special emphasis on the drama and Romantic school. This class is conducted in German. 
Prerequisite, German 31-32 or equivalent. 

Mr. McKenzie 

67-68. Eighteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Reading from Lessing, Goethe, Schiller. Conducted in German. Prerequisite, German 32. 

Mr. McKenzie 

Spanish 
11-12. First Year Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, composition and reading, with considerable 
emphasis on spoken Spanish. For students who have no acquaintance with the language. 

Miss Woods 
31-32. Intermediate Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar review, reading, dictation, speaking. Modern prose and plays. Prerequisite, 
Spanish 11-12 or satisfactory rating in achievement test. 

Miss Woods 
51-52. Conversation and Composition. (3 hrs.) 

Drill in conversational Spanish and advanced composition. Study of business and com- 
mercial Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 31-32 or the permission of the instructor. 

Miss Woods 

61-62. Readings in Spanish and Spanish-American Litera- 
ture. (3 hrs.) 

Study of literature leading to a minor. Prerequisite, Spanish 31-32 or the permission of the 
instructor. 

Miss Woods 



GROUP II— PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION 



EDUCATION 

R. H. Eliassen, Head of the Department 

F. H. Kirkpatrick, Professor 

Aims: 

The Department of Education seeks to develop in all students a wholesome and 
intelligent attitude toward public education; to stress a thorough understanding of 
human growth and development; to cultivate thinking about problems in education; 
to integrate its work with that of other departments in a well rounded liberal and pro- 
fessional education of prospective teachers who may qualify for teaching in Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and neighboring states; and to offer background and 
some technical preparation for types of guidance and personnel work. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of twenty-six hours in the department, with a sequence of courses ap- 
proved by the head of the department. Three hours of Psychology are required. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Twenty hours in the department. 

Teacher Training: 

Students who are interested in teaching should confer with the head of the Depart- 
ment of Education as early as possible, preferably during the freshman year and not 
later than the beginning of the upper division work. 

31-32. Human Growth and Development. (3 hrs.) 

A careful study of the individual through childhood and adolescence. An important part 
of the course will be the study of the nature and direction of learning, laws of learning, 
factors in learning, transfer of training, and individual differences. 

Mr. Eliassen and others 

46. West Virginia Geography, Government, and History. 
(3 hrs.) 

This course gives the important background for the "Mountain State." Not offered in 
1945-^46. 

50. Educational Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 50 or Education 32. 



Bethany College Bulletin 59 

51. History and Philosophy of Education. (3 hrs.) 

A general survey of educational theory and practice from the days of Ancient Greece to 
the present day. 

Mr. Eliassen 

52. Principles of Education. (3 hrs.) 

Stresses social and economic principles that govern education in America as well as the 
immediate and ultimate aims to be realized. 

Mr. Eliassen 
$$. Statistical Methods. (2 hrs.) 

Elementary methods of handling quantitative data in educational or psychological studies. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
57. Human Adjustment. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 57. 

61. Educational Measurements. (3 hrs.) 

Techniques for the measurement and evaluation of educational competence and develop- 
ment. Construction, validation, use, and interpretation of tests, rating scales, and inven- 
tories. Standard measurements of achievement, interests, attitudes, and special abilities. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 

62. Measurement of Intelligence. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 62. 

6$. Visual and Auditory Education. (2 hrs.) 

Emphasis on special materials and methods of visual and auditory education including 
motion pictures and radio. 

Mr. Eliassen 

72. Educational and Vocational Guidance. (2 hrs.) 

General introduction to functions and procedures related to vocational and educational 
guidance. 

Mr. Eliassen or Mr. Kirkpatrick 

73. Primary Methods. (2 hrs.) 

A study of procedures and methods as they apply to the primary grades with special em- 
phasis on new practices that have proved effective. Not offered in 1945-46. 

74. Educational Administration. (2 hrs.) 

Study of federal, state, and local administration of the schools. Functions of the board of 
education, superintendent, principal, and the teacher are stressed. 

Mr. Eliassen 



60 Bethany College Bulletin 

75. Integrated Methods. (3 hrs.) 

A study and laboratory course in procedures and methods as they apply throughout the 
public schools from intermediate grades through the secondary schools. Not offered in 
1945-46. 

Mr. Eliassen and 

81 or 82. Observation and Directed Teaching. (6 hrs.) 

This course is offered each semester and includes observations, participation activities 
and student teaching under supervision in the public schools. Students should not register 
for more than 16 semester hours of work during the semester in which this course is carried. 

Mr. Eliassen, , and Critic Teachers 

85 or 86. Special Methods. (2 or 3 hrs.) 

Many departments of the college offer courses in the teaching of the corresponding sec- 
ondary school subjects. These courses present the most approved methods in teaching 
subjects at the secondary school level. 

Mr. Eliassen and others 
85-86. Public School Music. (3 hrs.) 

See Music 85-86. 

85-86. Public School Art. (3 hrs.) 

This is largely a laboratory course devoted to techniques and procedures in applied arts 
to prepare teachers for directing art activities in the modern school. Not offered in 1945-46. 

91 or 92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Independent study and investigation in the field of professional education. Open only to 
students of unusual ability and adequate background in the field of education. 

Mr. Eliassen and Mr. Kirkpatrick 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 

Aims: 

To give professional insight and understanding in the field of personnel administration 
and labor relations. The courses are for students who plan to prepare for specific phase 
of personnel administration or who want some background as a part of their general 
education. 

^2- Labor Problems. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the position of the wage earner in mpdern industrial society. Historical back- 
ground of various labor problems; trade unionism; collective bargaining; labor legislation; 
problems of income; quest for security; relation of labor problems to social and economic 
objectives. Prerequisite six hours in Economics and Business Administration. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 



Bethany College Bulletin 6i 

54. Personnel Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Procedures, activities, and evaluation of personnel administration in business and indus- 
try. Selection and placement; job analysis and evaluation; training and promotion; job 
satisfaction; wages and hours; safety; manpower utilization; records and controls. Pre- 
reauisite six hours in Economics and Business Administration and six hours in Psychology. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
$$. Practicum. (2 hrs.) 

On-the-job experience in some phase of personnel administration following a well-planned 
program. Must be taken in summer vacation or in semester when student is not in residence. 
Open only to advanced students. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
65. Industrial Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 6$. 

74. Seminar on Personnel Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Independent study and conference reports on significant projects in specific areas of per- 
sonnel administration, i.e., industrial, retail, governmental, etc. Study of techniques, poli- 
cies, trends, and current issues. Open only to students who have professional interest and 
competence. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Andrew Leitch, Head of the Department 

Aims: 

Psychology is intended to acquaint the student with the facts and laws of behaviorj 
especially human behavior — physical and mental, normal and abnormal — and with 
the experimental and scientific approach to problems in this field. The courses offered 
are designed (a) to enable the student to develop a wholesome personality and to 
make adequate social adjustments; (b) to give background preparation for professions 
which relate to individual and group behavior; (c) to equip the student in an elemen- 
tary way for practical work in mental measurements, personnel analysis, and applied 
fields; and (d) to lay a broad foundation for graduate work and professional study in 
this or some related field. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four hours of psychology, which must include Psychology 31-32, 50, 
$3, 62, 64, and 75. A major should also include Biology 11-12 and Education 55. 
Biology 43 and Sociology 31 are recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen hours of psychology, which must include Psychology 31-32, 53, 62, 
and 64. Education 55 is recommended. 



62 Bethany College Bulletin 

31-32. General Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

An introductory course providing a systematic study of the most important facts and laws 
of behavior and mental life with emphasis on their practical significance. 

Mr. Leitch 
43. Introduction to Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

This course satisfies the Navy V-12, PSi requirement. 

Mr. Leitch 
50. Educational Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

An application of psychology in the field of education, with special attention to the learning 
process. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

53. Experimental Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A laboratory course of typical experiments in sensory, motor, intellectual, and emotional 
processes. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch and assistant 

54. Applied Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

The application of psychological principles to problems in the fields of business^ industry, 
and the professions. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 
$$. Social Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

The attitudes, motives, and behavior of the individual in his social relationships. Pre- 
requisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

57. Psychology of Personality. (3 hrs.) 

The phenomena of personality with special attention to the psychology of adjustment. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

58. Abnormal Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A systematic study of mental deficiency, the neuroses, the psychoses (insanity), and ab- 
normal traits in everyday life. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

59. Child and Adolescent Psychology, (3 hrs.) 

The physical, intellectual, emotional, social, moral, and religious development of the in- 
dividual in childhood and adolescence. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 



Bethany College Bulletin 63 

62. Measurement of Intelligence. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the more important techniques for intelligence testing. Laboratory work in 
individual and group tests. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 
64. Aptitude and Personality Testing. (3 hrs.) 

The techniques for measuring the special aptitudes. Personality measurement and rating. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 
6$. Industrial Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

General treatment of the applications of psychology to problems in the industrial and busi- 
ness world. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
75. Contemporary Schools of Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the historical development of the more important trends and schools of psychol- 
ogy. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 
91-92. Problems, (i hr.) 

An advanced course limited to senior majors. 

Mr. Leitch 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

J. J. Knight, Head of the Department 
S. Elizabeth Reed, Instructor 

Aims: 

It is the aim of the department of physical education and health (a) to promote the 
health education and physical development of the student; (b) to provide opportuni- 
ties for students to participate in and secure a reasonable degree of proficiency in 
physical recreation activities; and (c) to train physical education and play leaders for 
educational, industrial, and community situations. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of thirty hours which should include the following courses: Physical 
Education 15 or 16, 37, 67, 77, and 85. Sociology 31, Psychology 31-32, and Education 
31-32 are recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

A minimum of twenty hours in the department with the sequence of courses approved 
by the head of the department. 



64 Bethany College Bulletin 

Requirement for All Students: 

Freshmen — Physical Education 11-12 is required. Physical Education 15 or 16 may 
be elected in the freshman year. 

Sophomores — Physical Education 25, 26 is required of all students, but permission 
may be granted to substitute equivalent hours from courses 21, 22; 23, 24; 3$, 36; 
45, 46; 51, 52; or work in varsity athletics. Physical Education i£ or 16 is to be taken 
before the end of the Sophomore year. 

A season's work in varsity athletics, i.e., football, basketball, track, baseball and 
tennis is credited with one hour of physical education provided proper course regis- 
tration is made. Only two physical education hours may be obtained through varsity 
athletics. 

All students are required to present four hours of credit in Physical Education for 
graduation which must include Physical Education 11, 12 and 25, 26 or approved 
substitute courses. Not more than a total of four hours credit toward graduation will 
be allowed from courses 11, 12, 25, 16 and varsity athletics. 

All students will be required to pass a swimming achievement test prior to graduation. 
Students who are physically unfit as certified by the college physician may petition 
to be allowed to substitute hours in other courses in lieu of activity courses in physical 
education. Students who are not candidates for a degree may be exempt from the 
requirement in physical education. Any petition for exemption from physical education 
should be addressed to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. 

11-12. Freshman Physical Education, (i hr.) 

Outdoor and indoor activities and instruction in the techniques and rules of a wide variety 
of individual and team games. Required of all feshmen. An activity course. 3 periods per 
week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 
15 or 16. Personal Hygiene. (2hrs.) 

Fundamental knowledge of personal hygiene and how the health of the individual may be 
conserved. Especially for freshmen and sophomores. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
21-22. Tap and Character Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practical course starting out with elementary tap steps and combinations working up to 
finished routines and dances. Open to men and women. An activity course. 2 periods per 
week. 

Miss Reed 
23-24. Folk Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practice course in folk dancing from many countries. English and American country 
dances are studied during the first semester and European folk dances during the second 
semester. Open to men and women. An activity course. 2 periods per week. 

Miss Reed 



Bethany College Bulletin 6s 

25-26. Sophomore Physical Education, (i hr.) 

A practice course dealing with individual and team sports. For sophomores who desire to 
elect a general recreation course. An activity course. 3 periods per week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 
31. Scouting, (i hr.) 

Fundamentals of scouting. Elements of scout leadership, troop and pack management, 
program planning, camping, etc. A practical course involving experience with the local 
troop and occasional visits to Camp Bethany. 



32. Community Hygiene. (2hrs.) 

A study of health matters pertaining to the social group. 

Miss Reed 
34. Camping and Outdoors, (i hr.) 

See Biology 34. 

3$. Elementary Swimming, (i hr.) 

Instruction for beginners in buoyance and floating. Preliminary tests for swimming, and 
such strokes as elementary back, side, and crawl. An activity course. 3 periods per week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

36. Advanced Swimming, (i hr.) 

Instruction in the correct form of the more advanced strokes as the trudgen, American 
crawl, racing back, and breast. Diving and life-saving. Prerequisite, Physical Education 3$ 
or equivalent. An activity course. 3 periods per week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

37. Playground Management. (3 hrs.) 

Instruction in playground management, group games, relays, stunts, and rhythmic activi- 
ties for elementary children. Two hours of theory and one hour of practical work. 

Miss Reed 
39. Prevention and Care of Injuries. (2 hrs.) 

Common hazards of play and athletics with a study of preventive measures and treat- 
ment of injuries. Red Cross First Aid Certificate may be earned by those who pass the 
examination. 

Miss Reed and 

45. Tumbling and Stunts, (i hr.) 

Practice course beginning with individual stunts and advancing to more intricate work. 
An activity course. 2 periods per week. 

Mr. Knight 



66 Bethany College Bulletin 

46. Gymnastics and Apparatus, (i hr.) 

A survey course of various gymnastic systems and practice in apparatus. An activity 
course. 1 periods per week. 

Mr. Knight 
47-48. Theory and Practice of Team Sports, (i hr.) 

Intensive practice with opportunity for officiating in team sports of men and women. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 
50. Social Dancing, (i hr.) 

Instruction in the modern social dance steps. Not offered in 1945-1946. 



51-52. Modern Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practice course in contemporary dancing, emphasizing the use of fundamental expressive 
movements in creative work. An activity course. 1 periods per week. 

Miss Reed 
$3. Coaching Football. (2 hrs.) 

A study of fundamentals, offensive and defensive styles of play, conditioning players, rules 
of the game and officiating. 

Mr. Knight 
54. Coaching Basketball. (2 hrs.) 

A study of fundamentals, offensive and defensive types of play, rules and officiating. The 
place of basketball in the intramural program. 

Mr. Knight 
56. Baseball, Track and Field. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the strategy and fundamentals of baseball, track and field. 

Mr. Knight 
58. Community Recreation. (2 hrs.) 

Leisure and its meaning, education for leisure, effect of leisure on personality, recreation 
and social maladjustment, recreational movements and activities in the United States and 
foreign countries. 

Miss Reed 
67. Physiology. (3 hrs.) 

See Biology 67, 

70. Kinesiology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of fundamental bodily movements, and their relation to bodily development and 
efficiency. Prerequisite, Biology 36 and Biology 67. Not offered in 1945-46. 



Bethany College Bulletin 67 

72. Corrective Gymnastics and Normal Diagnosis. (2 hrs.) 

A study of variations of the normal tyjpes of the human organism at different age levels. 
Therapeutic measures will be evaluated, especially those which refer to the correction of 
mechanical defects. Prerequisite, Biology 36 and Biology 67. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

74. Organization and Administration of Physical Educa- 
tion. (3 hrs.) 

This course deals with administrative relationships and procedures in the conduct of 
physical education. 

Mr. Knight 

76. Theory and Practice of Individual Sports. (2 hrs.) 

Intensive practice in badminton, handball, archery, tennis, and golf. A study of the rules 
for each and of methods used in teaching. Open to men and women. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

77. History and Principles of Physical Education. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the development of physical education from ancient times to the present. A 
study of the principles underlying physical education and its educational content. 

Mr. Knight 
85. Methods of Health and Physical Education. (3 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

For advanced students of unusual ability in physical education who can undertake special 
problems for study or who are prepared to develop and project a program. 

Physical Education Staff 

NAVY V-12 PHYSICAL TRAINING PROGRAM 

A general conditioning and maintenance program in physical 
education is required of all students enrolled in the Navy V-12 pro- 
gram. Certain parts of this program are under the direction of the 
members of the college faculty cooperating with the members of 
the Navy staff at the college. Other parts are under the direct 
supervision of the members of the Navy staff. The college allows 
the substitution of these courses in lieu of its requirements in 
Physical Education. 



GROUP III— SOCIAL STUDIES 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

21-22. Introduction to the Social Studies. (3 hrs.) 

A general survey of the social sciences for freshmen, devoted to the study of human in- 
stitutions and their current problems. 

Mr. Woolery and 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

Burton H. Gildersleeve, Acting Head of 

the Department 
Aims: 

To give the student an understanding and appreciation of economic principles and 
problems, to furnish him a basis for intelligent citizenship in dealing with economic 
problems, and to equip him with fundamental and some technical preparation for 
business, for graduate study, and for the teaching of economics. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four semester hours, of which eighteen hours must be upper division courses. 
The major must include Economics 43-44, 45-46, 51, and one semester of Economics 
91-92. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen semester hours in an approved sequence are required for a minor in the de- 
partment. Nine hours must be in upper division courses. 

34. Economic Geography. (3 hrs.) 

See Geography 34. 

43-44. Principles and Problems of Economics. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the nature, scope and organization of economic activities in our modern society. 
Not open to freshmen. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

45. Elementary Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Elementary principles of accounting. Methods of collecting, recording, and reporting ac- 
counting information. Class and laboratory work. Not open to freshmen. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

46. Intermediate Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Further application of the principles covered in Economics 45, with special reference to 
corporation activities. Class and laboratory work. Prerequisite, Economics 45. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 



Bethany College Bulletin 69 

47. Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

Elementary statistical methods applied to both theoretical and practical problems of eco- 
nomic and business data. 

Mr. 

51. Money and Banking. (3 hrs.) 

The study of our present monetary and banking systems, including the Federal Reserve 
System, business cycle, and inflation in war time. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 
$3. Labor Problems. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the wage earner in our industrial society, with special reference to organized 
labor and labor legislation. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 
54. Insurance. (3 hrs.) 

Functions of the more important types of insurance through an analysis of their principles 
and practices. Life insurance and the various forms of property insurance. 

Mr. 

$5. Public Finance. (3 hrs.) 

Theories and principles of government finances, with special reference to taxation and 
reforms. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

61. Business Administration. (3 hrs.) 

The organization and management of business enterprise. For those who wish a general 
survey of functional techniques of business activities. 

Mr. 

62. Marketing. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the marketing institutions, methods and trends, with special reference to costs of 
marketing, policies, and operations. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. 

63. Advanced Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Theory and practical applications involving problems of valuation of assets and liabilities, 
reserves, depreciation, capital accounts and profits, dividends and corporate consolidation. 
Prerequisites, Economics 45 and Economics 46. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

64. Cost Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

General methods of collecting costs of material, labor, and burden and incorporating them 
in the books of account; operation reports and cost statistics; interpretation of cost data for 
commercial and industrial organization; elimination of waste through proper costing. Pre- 
requisites, Economics 45 and Economics 46. 

Mr. 



7<d Bethany College Bulletin 

6$. Business Law. (3 hrs.) 

Study of legal problems relating to the more common business transactions, such as con- 
tracts, sales, property, etc. 

Mr. 

68. Corporation Finance. (3 hrs.) 

Financial management of corporate enterprise; promotion, current administration, ex- 
pansion, failure and reorganization, and security regulation. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 
91-92. Seminar in Economics. (2 hrs.) 

Emphasis on independent study. Members may study problems in theoretical or applied 
economics in which they are particularly interested and in accordance with individual 
needs and preparation. Limited to seniors majoring or minoring in economics. Group meet- 
ings and individual conferences. Prerequisite, at least 15 semester hours in the department. 

Mr. Gildersleeve 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
W. K. Woolery, Head of the Department 

Chandler Shaw, Assistant Professor 

Aims : 

The aims of the courses in History are (a) to acquaint the student with the record of 
mankind and the forces which have created that record; (b) to develop a critical fac- 
ulty of interpreting the past; (c) to encourage an attitude of thought and concern on 
the present problems of public welfare; (d) to offer training for those who wish to 
teach history. The courses in political science are intended to provide training for 
professional careers in public service and in teaching the social studies. 

The content of the courses and the spirit of instruction in the History Department are 
based on the need for an understanding of the problems which war brings to the 
United States, and to the other nations as well, both for the background and for the 
necessities of the peace after the war. 

Requirements for Major: 

Students majoring in History should elect not less than twelve semester hours in 
European history, twelve semester hours in American history, and six hours in Political 
Science. Not less than eighteen hours must be taken in the upper division, and it is 
recommended that twelve hours be taken in each of the last two years. 

Requirements for Minor: 

The minimum requirement for a minor in History is eighteen hours in the department 
with not less than six hours of upper division work. Six hours of the minor may be in 
Political Science. 

A minimum of eighteen hours is required for a minor in Political Science. History 
41-42 may be made a part of the eighteen hours. All courses in Political Science apply 
on the History major but do not alter the minimum requirements for that major. 



Bethany College Bulletin 71 

European History 
11-12. History of Western Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of political, social, and cultural history from ancient times to the twentieth 
century. Intended as a foundation for the social sciences, English, foreign literatures, re- 
ligion, and the arts. 

Mr. Shaw 
51-52. Modern European History. (3 hrs.) 

The political and social development of Europe since 1648. 

Mr. Shaw 
56. Modern Plans for World Reconstruction. (3 hrs.) 

Peace plans, proposals for the coming years, and various pjans and agencies for world re- 
construction. 

Mr. Shaw 
6$. Ancient Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

The development of civilization in the Near East, Greece, and Italy. 

Mr. Shaw 
66. The Middle Ages. (3 hrs.) 

Western Europe from the fifth to the fifteenth centuries. 

Mr. Shaw 

70. The History of England. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of English institutions and the English people from the ninth to the early twenti- 
eth centuries. 

Mr. Shaw 

71. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3 hrs.) 

Studies in social and cultural history from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries. 

Mr. Shaw 
75-76. Contemporary World History. (3 hrs.) 

Political forces and international tensions since 1919. 

Mr. Shaw 
91. Seminar in European History, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Special topics for advanced students majoring in History. 

Mr. Shaw 

American History 
41-42. American History. (3 hrs.) 

Political and social history of the American people from colonial settlements to the present 
time. 

Mr. Shaw 



72 Bethany College Bulletin 

61. The Revolutionary Era. (3 hrs.) 

Constitutional history of the American nation from 1775 to 1825. Personalities as well as 
political constructions in the formative period of the United States. 

Mr. Woolery 

62. The Middle Period. (3 hrs.) 

Social and economic history of the United States from 1830 to i860. 

Mr. Woolery 

63. Hispanic America and the United States. (3 hrs.) 

The peoples of Latin America, their culture and political growth and their relations with 
the United States. 

Mr. Woolery 

64. The Diplomatic History of the United States. (3 hrs.) 

The international relations of the United States, with emphasis on the present period. 

Mr. Woolery 

67. Recent America. (3 hrs.) 

National development and international relations since 1865. 

Mr. Woolery 

68. The Social Record. (3 hrs.) 

Expression of American opinion and types of action, 1800 to 1935. 

Mr. Woolery 
85. Materials and Methods of Teaching History. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

92. Seminar in American History. (2 hrs.) 

A unifying course for advanced students majoring in History. 

Mr. Woolery 

Political Science 

57. Political Parties. (3 hrs.) 

The nature and effect of political ideas, the workings of parties, and the questions of 
political organizations and functions. 

Mr. Woolery 

58. Public Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Concepts and methods in the application of rules of public policy to problems of national, 
state, and municipal administration. 

Mr. Woolery 



Bethany College Bulletin 73 

59. American Government. (3 hrs.) 

Structure, functions, and problems of the national government. 

Mr. Woolery 

72. Constitutional Law. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of the constitutional law of the United States as established in decisions of the 
federal courts. 

Mr. Woolery 

73. Comparative Government. (3 hrs.) 

Government and politics of major European powers and Japan. 

Mr. Woolery 
80. History of Political Theory. (3 hrs.) 

History and analysis of the principal political theories from Plato to the end of the nine- 
teenth century. 

Mr. Woolery 

Naval History 

15-16. Historical Backgrounds of the Present World 
War. (2 hrs.) 

Sources and factors in national development, the course of America in world affairs, and 
the immediate backgrounds of the present war. This course satisfies Navy V-12, H-i and 
H-2 requirements. 

Mr. Woolery, Mr. Shaw 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

E. Hugh Behymer, Assistant Professor 

Aims: 

The course in Librarianship is especially planned for students (a) who may be inter- 
ested in Librarianship as a profession; (b) who are interested in finding out how to use 
the library; and (c) who plan to do high school teaching and who need some practical 
instruction in library method. 

21. Introduction to Librarianship. (3 hrs.) 

A general introductory course planned to give an overview of the field of librarianship, 
to study library development, and to suggest the opportunities for service which the li- 
brary profession offers. 

Mr. Behymer 
51. Library Techniques. (3 hrs.) 

A laboratory course planned to familiarize the prospective library school student with the 
kind of work and the type of problems undertaken in the professional library schools. 
Prerequisite, Library Science 21. 

Mr. Behymer 



74 Bethany College Bulletin 

SECRETARIAL TRAINING 

Pauline Eley, Instructor 

Aims: 

The courses in the department are planned especially for students (a) who want to 
prepare for office work and general business training; (b) who want to prepare for 
teaching commercial subjects in secondary schools by meeting certificate require- 
ments in this field; (c) who want training in typewriting and shorthand as a part of a 
larger educational program. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours are required for a minor in this department. These must be arranged 
in sequence and buttressed by courses in Economics and Business Administration. 

11. Elementary Typewriting. (3 hrs.) 

A beginning course for those who wish to acquire a working knowledge of typewriting for 
personal and incidental vocational uses. 40 words a minute a minimum requirement. 

Miss Eley 

12. Advanced Typewriting. (3 hrs.) 

The purpose of this course is to develop marketable proficiency in the use of the type- 
writer. 50 words a minute a minimum requirement. 

Miss Eley 
15-16. Beginning Shorthand. (3 hrs.) 

Careful study of Gregg Functional shorthand principles and their application in timed 
dictation and transcription. Prerequisite or corequisite, Secretarial Training 11. 

Miss Eley 
29-30. Advanced Gregg Shorthand. (3 hrs.) 

The development of (a) an intensive shorthand vocabulary, (b) a shorthand writing speed 
of at least 1 10-120 words a minute, and (c) a transcribing rate of 35 words a minute. 

Miss Eley 

45. Principles of Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 45. 

46. Principles of Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 46. 

47. Business Mathematics. (3 hrs.) 

Mathematical problems which occur most frequently in ordinary business transactions. 

Miss Eley 



Bethany College Bulletin 75 

50. Secretarial Practice and Office Management. (3 hrs.) 

This course is based on an activity program of simulated and actual experiences and repre- 
sentative types of office situations. 

Miss Eley 

51. Business Letters and Reports. (3 hrs.) 

Principles and practices of business letter writing with special emphasis on the sales letter. 
Prerequisite, or parallel, Secretarial Training n. 

Miss Eley 

52. Filing and Indexing. (3 hrs.) 

The general principles, procedures, and systems of filing, including sufficient practice with 
laboratory sets to develop facility and skill. Individual miniature practice equipment is 
provided for each student. 

Miss Eley 
61. Business Administration. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 61. 

63. Advanced Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 63. 

64. Cost Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 64. 

65. Business Law. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 6$. 

66. Consumer Problems. (3 hrs.) 

Specific principles of buying, budgeting, investments, price control, economic fluctuation 
and change, marketing functions, taxes, and credit. 

Miss Eley 
85. Teaching of Business Subjects. (2 or 3 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

88. Supervised Secretarial Practice. (3 hrs.) 

Practical experience in some approved office situation under guidance and supervision of 
instructor and business representative. Course open to seniors. 

Miss Eley 
91. Problems in Secretarial Training, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A senior seminar devoted to problems of vocational supply and demand; and technique 
involved in obtaining initial employment. 

Miss Eley 



y6 Bethany College Bulletin 

SOCIOLOGY 

E. C. Paustian, Acting Head of the Department 

Aims: 

The curriculum in Sociology is designed (a) to give an understanding of human rela- 
tionships, institutions, social processes; (b) to familiarize students with the nature 
and causes of the social problems; (c) to equip the student with fundamental prepara- 
tion for entering various kinds of social work; and (d) to provide preparation for teach- 
ing Sociology and for post-graduate or professional study. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four semester hours in the department, including Social Science 21-22, 
Sociology 31-32, 43, 91-92, Biology 11-12, Economics 47, Psychology 55, 58. Sociology 
6$ and 73 are recommended for those expecting to major in the field of social work. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours in an approved sequence of which twelve hours must be in upper di" 
vision courses. 

31. General Sociology. (3 hrs.) 

The basic concepts and principles of sociology applied to modern society; social relations of 
the community; race and culture; social maladjustments; social change. 

Mr. Paustian 

32. Family Relationships. (3 hrs.) 

The development of marriage and the family social functions; contemporary problems and 
tendencies of the family. Prerequisite, Social Science 21-22 or Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 
43. Heredity and Eugenics. (2 hrs.) 

See Biology 43. 

47. Social Measurements. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 47. 

52. Population Problems. (3 hrs.) 

History of population theories and policies; qualitative aspects of the population problem 
with reference to eugenics, migration, control of population. Prerequisite, Social Science 
21-22 or Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 
$$. Social Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 55. 

$6. Criminology. (3 hrs.) 

Analysis of the social process by which individuals become criminals and delinquents; 



Bethany College Bulletin 77 

causative factors, techniques of control, and the social treatment of crime. Prerequisite, 
Social Science 21-22 or Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 
58. Abnormal Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 58. 

64. Social Service Practicum. (1-4 hrs.) 

Student training and experience during the summer months on the staff of an approved 
social service agency. Only by prior arrangement with the head of the department can stu- 
dents be given an opportunity to earn credit in this way. Intended primarily for Sociology 
majors. 

Mr. Paustian 
6$. Community Organization. (2 hrs.) 

Social structure and functions of the modern community. Social, economic, and political 
organization of urban and rural populations. Prerequisite, Sociology 31 and Sociology 32. 

Mr. Paustian 
67. Cultural Anthropology. (2 hrs.) 

A study of primitive people and their institutions in pre-historic and modern times. Pre- 
requisite, Social Science 21-22 or Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 
70. Social Disorganization. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the major social lags leading to social breakdowns, unemployment, poverty, 
dependency, delinquency, disease, and crime. Prerequisite, Social Science 21-22 or Sociol- 
ogy 31 and upper division standing. 

Mr. Paustian 

72. Introduction to Social Case Work. (3 hrs.) 

The basic principles and methods of social case work and their application in the treatment 
of individuals and families. Prerequisites, Sociology 31 and Sociology 32, upper division 
standing and permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Paustian 

73. Social Theory. (3 hrs.) 

A summing up of the various systems, classic and modern, of explaining the social behavior 
of individuals and groups. The nature of social control, chief control devices, institutional 
pressures and disruptive factors. Prerequisite, twelve hours of Sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 
80. Group Organization and Leadership. (2 hrs.) 

The organization and leadership of homogeneous groups; significance of social processes 
characterizing such groups on the achievement of socialization and in the treatment of 
pathological behavior. Prerequisite, twelve semester hours in Sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 



78 Bethany College Bulletin 

81. Social Ethics. (2 hrs.) 

A study of applied ethics to the problems of adolescence, sex, courtship and marriage; of 
production and consumption, distribution and conservation of wealth; of capitalism; of 
world citizenship; and of democracy and Christianity. Prerequisite, twelve semester hours 
in Sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 

83. Industrial Sociology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the social forces back of modern industrialism. Social effects of modern indus- 
trialism on health, unemployment, poverty, leisure, the family, and creative intelligence. 
Prerequisite, twelve semester hours in Sociology. 

Mr. Paustian 

84. Play and Recreational Leadership. (2 hrs.) 

A study of leisure-time activities and community play leadership. 

Mr. Paustian 
91-92. Seminar in Sociology, (i hr.) 

An advanced course for major and minor students in the department. The course has three 
purposes: (i) to interpret by summary and interpretation the preceding work in the depart- 
ment; (2) to offer instruction in the techniques and methods of social research; (3) to give 
each student an opportunity to develop his particular interest through a specific study proj- 
ect. Prerequisites, Sociology 47 and upper division standing in the department. 

Mr. Paustian 



GROUP IV— SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 



BIOLOGY 

B. R. Weimer, Head of the Department 

W. J. Sumpstine, Assistant Professor 

Elizabeth J. Murphy, Instructor 

WlLMA M. SUMPSTINE, ASSOCIATE 



Aims: 



The courses are intended (a) to acquaint the student with the living world around him 
and the fundamental dynamic life processes; (b) to demonstrate scientific methods of 
approach to problem solution; (c) to cultivate an attitude of inquiry and research; 
(d) to develop laboratory skill in various types of work in zoology, botany, and related 
fields; and (e) to train students as teachers of biology and for certain professional work 
related to this field. 

Students who plan to teach or become professional biologists should elect the following 
sequence of courses: Biology 11-12, 36, 43, 48, 53, 57, 6$, 67, 78, 81, and 91 or 92. 

Students preparing for work in medicine, dentistry, nursing or as laboratory tech- 
nicians should elect the following sequence of courses: Biology n-12, 36, 43, 53, 76, 
78, 81, and 91 or 92. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four semester hours in the department following a sequence of courses 
approved by the head of the department. A minimum of twelve semester hours of 
chemistry, at least six of which are in organic chemistry, is desirable. 

A minor should be elected in a laboratory science. Either German or French should 
be elected to meet the graduation requirement for foreign languages. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen semester hours in the department exclusive of Biology 34 and 
Biology 85. 

11-12. General Biology. (3 hrs.) 

Systematic study of the fundamental structures and life processes of plants and animals, 
including man, and their important inter-relationships. Required of all premedical students. 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Sumpstine, and assistants 
34. Our Outdoors, (i hr.) 

A general survey course in the field of man's natural environment from the standpoint of 
geology and biology. Estimated cost of the course to the student exclusive of tuition, 
including trips, food, and minor incidentals: $5.00 to #8.00. Not open to freshmen. Enroll- 
ment limited to fifteen. 

Mr. Weimer and others 



80 Bethany College Bulletin 

36. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. (4 hrs.) 

Study of the comparative anatomy of the representative forms of vertebrates. Laboratory 
study of the comparative anatomy of the shark, turtle, and cat. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. 
Required of all premedical students. 

Mr. Weimer, Mrs. Sumpstine, and assistants 
43. Heredity and Eugenics. (2 hrs.) 

A general course covering modern theories and laws of heredity and their relation to man. 

Mr. Weimer 
48. Plant Ecology and Local Flora. (2 hrs.) 

The identification of the common seed plants and ferns by the use of manuals and the 
study of the relation between plants and their environment. Prerequisite, Biology n or 
high school biology. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
$3. Bacteriology. (3 hrs.) 

Morphology and physiology of yeasts and bacteria, principles of laboratory technique, 
cultural characteristics, and environmental influences on bacterial growth. 

Mr. Sumpstine and assistants 

54. Industrial Bacteriology and Clinical Methods. (3 
hrs.) 

A practical laboratory course with occasional lectures, dealing with the bacteriology of 
water and milk, and the general food bacteriology. Some study of the elementary techniques 
in clinical methods such as blood work and urine analysis. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
57. Advanced General Botany. (3 hrs.) 

An advanced study of the structural relationships of various type forms of the plant king- 
dom together with a study of the fundamental life processes of plants; growth, irritability, 
food synthesis, and metabolism. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
65. Invertebrate Zoology. (3 hrs.) 

Survey of the invertebrate animals including phylogeny and morphology. A laboratory 
study of representative forms of invertebrates will be made. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
67. Physiology. (3 hrs.) 

Structure and functions of the human body and the mechanism of bodily movements, re- 
sponses, reactions, and various physiological states. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biol- 
ogy 36. Required of all majors in Physical Education. 

Mr. Weimer and assistants 



Bethany College Bulletin 8i 

76. Histology. (3 hrs.) 

Structure of the cell and its modifications into various tissues. Special attention will be 
paid to the theory and practice of general histological technique. Prerequisites, Biology 
11-12 and Biology 36. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
78. Vertebrate Embryology. (4 hrs.) 

Nature and development of the tissues and organs in vertebrates. Embryos of chick and 
pig are studied in the laboratory. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biology 36. 

Mr. Weimer and assistants 

81. Contemporary Biological Investigations and Litera- 
ture. (1 hr.) 

A survey of the fields of biological investigations and the current literature relating to in- 
vestigations in those fields. Open only to juniors and seniors. Required of all Biology ma- 
jors. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biology 36. 

Mr. Weimer 

85. Methods and Materials in Teaching Biology. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

86. Marine Biology. (4-6 hrs.) 

Credit is given for summer courses taken at the Marine Biological Station at Woods Hole, 
Massachusetts, or at any other station of similar rank. 

91-92. Problems. (1 or 2 hrs.) 

A course in theoretical and advanced morphological biology. The problem may be selected 
by the student, subject to the approval of the instructor, according to interest and future 
needs and may be in either: 

a. Advanced comparative anatomy of vertebrate or invertebrate types not previously 
studied; or 

b. Review of the literature relating to various fields of investigation in biology; or 

c. Study of some problem in biological research. 

No registration for the course will be permitted without previous conference with the in- 
structor. Open only to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12, 36 and 65, or 36 
and 78, and superior achievement in these courses. 

Mr. Weimer 



82 Bethany College Bulletin 

CHEMISTRY 

George W. Bennett, Acting Head of the Department 
Hilda Sarver, Instructor 
Howard B. Trombley, Instructor 

Aims: 

It is the aim of the department (a) to contribute to the student's general culture, his 
understanding of the nature of the physical world and his understanding of the place 
of chemistry in industrial and business life; (b) to provide training in the scientific 
method and logical analysis; and (c) to provide major students with a thorough and 
practical training in chemistry which may be useful in industrial, technical, or educa- 
tional work. 

Requirement for Majors: 

The Department of Chemistry offers two majors. 

The Professional Chemistry Major. This sequence is designed to conform to approved 
curricula for the professional training of chemists. It is a thorough course for superior 
students. Courses required include Chemistry 11-12; 25-26; 61-62; 6^-66; 75-76; 
Physics 31-32; Mathematics 11-12; 01-32; English 11-12; a minimum of 16 hours in 
the humanities above other required courses; German is the specified language. Stu- 
dents in this major cannot expect to graduate on the minimum hours required for 
graduation. 

The Basic Chemistry Major. This sequence is designed to give basic training in che- 
istry and to prepare students for admission to the medical and dental colleges and 
schools of nursing. It is recommended for students wishing to become teachers, tech- 
nicians, or laboratorians. Courses required include a minimum of Chemistry 11-12; 
21 or 22; 61-62; 71, and 87-88. In addition to chemistry, courses in mathematics, 
physics, modern languages and the humanities are recommended in accordance with 
the student's choice of field of major interest. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours with either sequence I or II. 
I. Chemistry 11-12, 25-26, 61-62. 
II. Chemistry 11-12, 21, 61-62. 

11-12. General Chemistry. (4.hrs.) 

A first course in chemistry which conforms to the standards set up by the Division of 
Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society. Prerequisite to all other chemistry 
courses. 

Miss Sarver 
11A-12A. General Chemistry. (4hrs.) 

This course satisfies Navy V-12 Cla-2a requirements. 

Miss Sarver and Mr. Trombley 



Bethany College Bulletin 83 

21-22. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

Minimum essentials of quantitative analysis for pre-medical students. Either semester or 
both. 

Mr. Bennett 
25-26. Quantitative Analysis. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in quantitative analysis for professional chemists and engineers. A 
continuous course. 

Mr. Bennett 
61-62. Introductory Organic Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in organic chemistry for students in both majors. 

Miss Sarver 
6^-66. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A course designed to conform to the requirements of the American Chemical Society for 
the professional training of chemists. Open only to students in the professional major. 
Not offered in 1945-46. 

Miss Sarver 
71. Elementary Physical Chemistry. (3 hrs.) 

A brief introduction to selected areas in physical chemistry for premedical students. 

Mr. Bennett 
75-76. Physical Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in physical chemistry. Prerequisites, Chemistry 25-26, 61-62, Physics 
31-32, Mathematics 31-32. 

Mr. Bennett 
81-82. Engineering Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

Unit operations of chemical engineering and industrial stoichiometry. Open to students 
with approved preparation. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. Bennett 
87-88. The Literature of Chemistry, (i hr.) 

Bibliographic, biographic, and historical library problems. Either semester or both. Pre- 
requisites, Chemistry 21-22 or 25-26 and 61-62. 

Mr. Bennett 
91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Laboratory investigations of an original nature. Open to students with approved prepara- 
tion. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Members of the Staff 



84 Bethany College Bulletin 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

34. Economic Geography. (3 hrs.) 

Study of world production and distribution of food supplies, power, resources, and raw 
materials for manufacture, with reference to the natural and economic determining factors. 
Open to freshmen. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
3$. Principles of Geography. (3 hrs.) 

A discussion of the general principles of the science including such topics as earth origins 
and the results of the dynamic geographical agencies tending to change its surface. Practi- 
cal work in mineralogy, physiography, and stratigraphy is required during the course. 

Mr. Sumpstine 
36. Historical Geology. (3 hrs.) 

The history of the earth as revealed by its strata. Laboratory and field study of the common 
fossils and local formations. 

Mr. Sumpstine 

MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS 

J. S. V. Allen, Head of the Department 

Allen Simmons, Associate Professor 

John S. Cluss, Instructor 

Bradford Tye, Instructor 

Paul E. Brown, Instructor 

Howard B. Trombley, Instructor 

Aims: 

The courses in Mathematics are designed (a) to give the prospective teacher a thorough 
understanding and a wide appreciation of the fundamental ideas of elementary mathe- 
matics; (b) to provide the general student with a knowledge of the mathematical 
foundation of our civilization; (c) to provide a tool for the technical student; (d) to 
give the prospective graduate student a firm foundation for later study and research. 

The courses in Physics are planned (a) to present a survey of the field of physics to 
the general student; (b) to teach the fundamentals of the science of physics to students 
who are training themselves for such professions as medicine, optometry, engineer- 
ing, and the teaching of physics; (c) to familiarize students expecting to enter grad- 
uate school with some of the more advanced materials in physics. The scientific 
method is stressed both in its past applications in solving important problems in phys- 
ics and for its future use by the student in solving new problems. 

Requirement for Major in Mathematics: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in Mathematics including Mathematics 31-32, and 
at least twelve upper division hours. The upper division courses should include Mathe- 



Bethany College Bulletin 85 

matics 53-54. Students interested in science and engineering should elect Mathematics 
71 . Students interested in mathematics as a teaching subject should elect Mathe- 
matics SS~S^' Two courses in the department should be taken in the senior year. 

Requirement for Major in Physics: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in Physics is required. Students interested in science 
and engineering should elect Physics 52. Physics 91-92 and a reading knowledge of 
German and French are recommended for students expecting to do graduate work. 
A minor in Mathematics or Chemistry is strongly recommended. 

Requirement for Minor in Mathematics: 

A minimum of eighteen hours in Mathematics including Mathematics 31-32 and six 
hours in upper division courses. 

Requirement for Minor in Physics: 

A minimum of eighteen hours in Physics. Mathematics 11-12 and Mathematics 3 1-32 
should be elected. 

Mathematics 
11-12. Mathematical Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

Graphical representation of functions, logarithms and the slide rule, plane trigonometry, 
identities and equations, straight line, and analytical geometry of second degree curves. 

Mr. 

Students ranking low in mathematics placement test for freshmen will be required to make 
up their deficiency in Mathematics by attending a special laboratory section. 

13-14. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

For students whose preparation is less than that of those assigned to Mathematics 15-16. 
This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-i and M-2 requirements. 



15-16. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-i and M-2 requirements. 

17-18. Mathematical Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-3 and M-4 requirements. 



Mr. 



Mr. 



Mr. 



21. Engineering Drawing. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of engineering drawing, straight and curved line construction, projection, per- 
spective, and isometric drawing. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. 



86 Bethany College Bulletin 

24. Plane Surveying. (3 hrs.) 

Care and use of surveying instrument, field problems, and computation and mapping. 
One hour class work and four hours field work each week. 

Mr. Simmons 

25. Engineering Drawing. (2 hrs.) 

This course satisfies Navy V-12, D-i requirements. 

Mr. Simmons 

26. Descriptive Geometry. (2 hrs.) 

Prerequisite Mathematics 25. This course satisfies Navy V-12, D-2 requirements. 

Mr. Simmons 
31-32. Differential and Integral Calculus. (3 hrs.) 

A standard course. Technique of differentiation and integration with applications and an 
introduction to infinite series. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12 or equivalent. 

Mr. Tye 

33-34. Calculus I. (5 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12, Mathematics 15-16 or Mathematics 17-18. This course 
satisfies Navy V-12, M-5, requirements. 

Mr. Tye, Mr. Cluss and Mr. Brown 

37. Mathematics of Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

Frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and correlation, regres- 
sion equations, and the theory of probability. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12. 

Mr. 

38. Mathematics of Finance and Investment. (3 hrs.) 

The operation of interest in annuities, amortization of debts and sinking funds, valuation 
of bonds, the experience table, and calculation of premiums for life insurance. Recom- 
mended for students majoring in economics. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12. 

Mr. 

41-42. Elementary Navigation and Nautical Astronomy I 
and II. (3 hrs.) 

This course satisfies Navy V-12, M-8 and M-9 requirements. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
15-16, Mathematics 17-18, or Mathematics 11 -12. 

Mr. Cluss 
53-54. Advanced Calculus. (3 hrs.) 

Theory of the derivative and the integral, partial differentiation and its applications, 
Green's and Stokes' theorems, power series, and Fourier series. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
31-32- 

Mr. Tye 



Bethany College Bulletin 87 

$$. Introduction to Higher Algebra. (3 hrs.) 

Theory of equations, solution of cubic, quartic, and numerical equations, complex num- 
bers, and an introduction to the fundamental concepts of algebra, class, group, field, num- 
ber. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. Tye 

$6. Introduction to Modern Geometry. (3 hrs.) 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, an introduction to synthetic projective geometry, 
the concept of limit and infinity, geometrical constructions, recent developments and theo- 
rems. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or its equivalent. 

Mr. Tye 

59. Advanced Analytic Geometry. (3 hrs.) 

Advanced methods and problems of analytic geometry of two and three dimensions, includ- 
ing loci, the general equation of the second degree, Euclidean transformations, poles and 
polars, quadric surfaces, determinants. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or its equivalent. 

Mr. Tye 

71. Differential Equations. (3 hrs.) 

Methods of solution of ordinary differential equations and their applications to the physical 
sciences. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32 or its equivalent. 

Mr. Tye 

81-82. Mathematics Seminar, (i hr.) 

Special reports prepared and presented by the student under supervision. The work of the 
second semester will help prepare the student for the comprehensive examination. Required 
of all major students in the senior year. 

Mr. Simmons and Mr. Tye 
86. Teaching of Mathematics. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 86. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Advanced work and independent study. Open to seniors of unusual ability who have com- 
pleted eighteen hours in the department. A reading knowledge of French and German will 
be found desirable. 

Mr. Cramblet, Mr. Simmons, Mr. Tye 

Physics 
15. Photography. (3 hrs.) 

A beginning course in photographic theory and practice in general photography with some 
special applications, such as X-ray work, spectroscopy, and astronomy. 

Mr. 



88 Bethany College Bulletin 

i 6. Astronomy. (3 hrs.) 

A course in descriptive astronomy with applications to navigation. Two lectures per week 
and observations with the io-inch reflecting telescope. 

Mr. 

21. Elements of Radio. (3 hrs.) 

A beginning course in radio theory and practice. The laboratory work includes the con- 
struction of oscillators, amplifiers, and receivers. 

Mr. 



31-32. General Physics. (4 hrs.) 

An elementary treatment of mechanics, sound, and heat; magnetism, electricity and light. 
This is the fundamental course in physics which is a prerequisite to all advanced physics 
courses. Prerequisite, Mathematics n or its equivalent. 

Mr. Allen 
25. Basic Electronics. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

A course in the fundamentals of electronics. Four hours credit is possible if the laboratory 
work is also elected. Prerequisite or corequisite, Physics 32. 

Mr. Allen 

52. Mechanics. (3 hrs.) 

A fundamental course in physics, including a treatment of classical mechanics with appli- 
cation of principles; and a brief consideration of wave mechanics. 

Mr. Allen 

53. Advanced Light and Physical Optics. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

Theories of light, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, polarization, geometrical 
optics, optical instruments, vision, and spectroscopy. Four hours credit is possible if the 
laboratory work is also elected. Prerequisite, Physics 31-32 and Mathematics 31-32. 

Mr. Allen 

61. Electrical Engineering. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Physics 31-32. This course satisfies Navy V-12, EE2 requirements. 

Mr. Allen 

62. Elementary Heat Power. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Physics 32 and Mathematics 12, 14, 16, or 18. This course satisfies the Navy 
V-12, ME2 requirements. 

Mr. Allen and Mr. Simmons 

63. Electricity and Magnetism. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

An advanced treatment of electrostatics and magnetics, electro-chemistry, circuit theory, 
electrical machinery, and electronics. A consideration of the theoretical and practical 
applications of electricity and magnetism. Four hours credit is possible if the laboratory 
work is also elected. Prerequisite, Physics 31-32 and Mathematics 31-32. 

Mr. Allen 



Bethany College Bulletin 89 

64. Heat. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

An advanced study of temperature, quantity of heat, calorimetry, expansion, conductivity, 
change of state, and radiation. Some consideration will be given thermodynamics and ki- 
netic theory. Four hours credit is possible if the laboratory work is also elected. Prerequi- 
site, Physics 31-32 and Mathematics 31-32. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. Allen 

65. Radio and Television. (3 hrs.) 

A more advanced course in the theory of radio, carrier-current communication, radar, and 
television. Prerequisite, Physics 32. 

Mr. Allen 
67-68. Spectroscopic Analysis, (i hr.) 

A laboratory course employing an E-i Hilger Spectrograph and auxiliary equipment for 
analytical work. Much of the work in this course consists of original research and publica- 
tion of the results. Admission by permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Allen 
73. Analytical Mechanics I (Statics). (2 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, or corequisite, Mathematics 32 or 34. This course satisfies Navy V-12, Al 
requirements. 

Mr. Simmons 
75. Electronics. (3 hrs.) 

A more advanced course in electronics, concerned with thyratrons, ignitrons, converters, 
inverters, and industrial control circuits. Prerequisite, Physics 35. 

Mr. Allen 
85. Teaching of Physics. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Readings, experiments and investigations in radioactivity, spectroscopy, radio, and elec- 
tronics, or in the field of the student's interest. Open to juniors and seniors of superior abil- 
ity and accomplishment who are majoring or minoring in the department. 

Mr. Allen 



GROUP V— RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY, AND 

FINE ARTS 



RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

Dwight E. Stevenson, Head of the Department 

Irvin T. Green, Professor 

Harry L. Ice, Professor 

James B. Miller, Instructor 
Aims: 

(a) To provide for all students in the liberal arts a focus of religious meanings for the 
integration of knowledge and for the guidance of life, more especially as that system 
of meanings is to be discovered in the Bible record of the Jewish and Christian faiths. 

(b) To prepare students planning to enter the various branches of the Christian Minis- 
try for graduate study in professional schools of religion and divinity schools. 

(c) To give enough professional guidance to enable a graduate of the college to enter 
immediately into Christian service as a minister or religious educator, until such time 
as graduate study may be possible for him. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours, of which eighteen hours shall be in the upper division. For pre- 
ministerial students this shall include Bible 33-34, 53-54. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours, of which twelve hours shall be in the upper division. A minimum of 
eighteen hours in Philosophy is required for a minor in Philosophy. 

Requirement for Graduation: 

Six hours of work in The English Bible are required of all students qualifying for grad- 
uation. Any of the following courses may be taken without prerequisite to satisfy this 
requirement: In the sophomore year — Bible 31-32. In the junior or senior year: — 
Bible 53-54; 55-56; 65-66; 71-72. Only students studying for the Christian ministry 
are permitted to take Bible 31 in the freshman year; most students planning to 
major in other departments will take their basic requirement in the sophomore year. 

The Bible 

31. The Growth of Bible Religion. (3 hrs.) 

The development of several great religious ideas through the progressive stages of biblical 
literature. To be taken in the sophomore year. 

Mr. Stevenson 

32. New Testament History. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the life and message of Jesus, the origin of the Christian Church, and the work 



Bethany College Bulletin 91 

of Paul. Ministerial students should elect a full year, Bible 33-34, in place of this course. 
To be taken in the sophomore year. 

Mr. Green 
33-34. New Testament Survey. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of all books of the New Testament. The first semester will be devoted to the 
Four Gospels. 

Mr. Green 
53-54. Old Testament History. (3 hrs.) 

A history of the political and religious development of the Hebrew people to the time of the 
Maccabees. 

Mr. Stevenson 
^. The Prophets. (3 hrs.) 

The origin and development of prophecy among the Hebrews. Special attention to social 
and political backgrounds. 

Mr. Stevenson 
56. Old Testament Religion. (3 hrs.) 

A study of religious faith and practice in the Old Testament. 

Mr. Stevenson 
6$. The Teachings of Jesus. (3 hrs.) 

The teachings of Jesus in relation to the movements of his time, and to the Jewish and 
Greek backgrounds. 

Mr. Green 
66. The Teachings of Paul. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the fundamental doctrines of the Epistles of Paul in the New Testament. 

Mr. Green 
71-72. The Bible as Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the various types of literature in the Bible together with their composition and 
transmission. 

Mr. Stevenson 
73-74. New Testament Greek. (3 hrs.) 

The Gospel of Luke and selections from the Pauline Epistles will be read and studied. The 
grammar of the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: two years of classical Greek. 

Mr. Green 
83-84. Biblical Doctrine. (3 hrs.) 

An investigation of the various doctrines of the New Testament; studied in relation to later 
Christian thinking. 

Mr. Green 



92 Bethany College Bulletin 

91-92. Problems. (2 hrs.) 

An investigation of special problems of Biblical scholarship. An advanced course for ma- 
jors. Problems to be selected by the individual student on the basis of personal interest 
and faculty advice. 

Mr. Green, Mr. Stevenson 

Church History 
51-52. History and Literature of the Disciples. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the rise and development of the Restoration Movement, including an evalua- 
tion of the literature produced. 

Mr. Green 

69. The Ancient Church. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of church history from the beginning to the reign of Charlemagne. 

Mr. Green 

70. The Reformation. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of church history from Charlemagne to the close of the Reformation. 

Mr. Green 

Religious Education and Homiletics 

37. The Theory of Religious Education. (3 hrs.) 

A lecture and reading course to acquaint the student with the principles of religious edu- 
cation, factors involved in religious growth and development, functions of family, church, 
and state in religious education. 

Mr. Miller 

38. The Educational Work of the Church. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the total educational program of the church, with special emphasis on the 
Church School. Alternates with Religious Education 40. 

Mr. Miller 
40. Special Projects in Religious Education. (3 hrs.) 

Emphasis on week-day religious education, public school courses in religion, the vacation 
Church School. Alternates with Religious Education 38. 

Mr. Miller 
61-62. The Theory of Preaching. (3 hrs.) 

The preparation and delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Green 



Bethany College Bulletin 93 

63-64. The Work of the Pastor. (3 hrs.) 

The organization of the local church, including a study of financial methods, evangelism, 
worship and social problems. 

Mr. Green 
Philosophy 

53-54. History of Philosophy. (3 hrs.) 

A rapid survey of western philosophical thought from the seventh century B.C. to modern 
times. 

Mr. Stevenson 
^. Reflective Thinking. (3 hrs.) 

An analysis of deductive and inductive reasoning; practice in the detection of logical fal- 
lacies. 

Mr. Stevenson 
^6. Ethics. (3 hrs.) 

The theory of the moral life as developed in the history of western thought and applied to 
personal and social problems. 

Mr. Stevenson 



57. Contemporary Philosophy. (3 hrs.) 

A study of western philosophical thought since 1900. 



Mr. Stevenson 



58. Philosophy of Religion. (3 hrs.) 

Investigation of the life situation out of which religion rises for the individual and for 
society; a study of religion in belief and in practice. 

Mr. Stevenson 
61-62. Plato. (3 hrs.) 

A critical study of the philosophy of Plato and its influence on ancient and modern thought 
and culture. 

Mr. Gay 

6^. Problems of Philosophy. (2 hrs.) 

Five or six of the major problems of knowledge and existence will be investigated i,n the 
writings of great philosophers ranging from Plato to modern times. A seminar course. 

Mr. Ice 
64. Contemporary Trends in Religious Thinking. (2 hrs.) 

An introduction to current movements of life and thought in the contemporary religious 
world. Inter-faith relations and the eccumenical movement will be studied along with cer- 
tain developments in theology. 

Mr. Ice 



94 Bethany College Bulletin 

MUSIC 

Rush Carter, Head of the Department 
George Hauptfuehrer, Instructor 

Aims: 

The department aims (a) to provide opportunity for students to develop an under- 
standing and appreciation of music as a part of a general education; (b) to provide a 
well-balanced and complete four-year course for students who major in music for the 
purpose of becoming professional performers or private teachers; and (c) to provide a 
course for students who desire to become supervisors and teachers of music in elemen- 
tary and high schools. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four hours in the department, including eighteen upper division hours. 
The major may be earned in (a) theory of music, or (b) teaching of music in the schools. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen hours in the department, approved by the department head. 

Literature and Theory of Music 
11-12. Ear Training and Sight Singing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of tonal relationships, simple rhythms, melodies in both major and minor modes, 
simple melodic forms and harmonic progressions. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
31-32. Music Appreciation. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the aesthetic significance of the main types and periods of music leading to an 
intelligent appreciation and enjoyment of the world's great music. A general course requir- 
ing no technical background. 

Mr. Carter 

35. Harmony I. (3 hrs.) 

A study of major and minor scales, all intervals and relation to scales, the use of tonic and 
dominant seventh chords in all positions of four-part harmony, with all by-tones. 

Mr. Carter 

36. Harmony II. (3 hrs.) 

A study of all primary and secondary harmonies used in four-part writing and with simple 
accompaniment; the beginning of modulation. 

Mr. Carter 
51-52. Music History. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the historical significance of the main periods and types of music. A technical 



Bethany College Bulletin 95 

course primarily for those looking toward a major or minor in music, or for those with suffi- 
cient musical background. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
$$. Harmony III. (3 hrs.) 

A study of chromatic harmony and advanced modulation. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. Carter 
$6. Form and Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the structural designs upon which music is based, including polyphonic, classic, 
romantic, and modern periods. Not offered in 1945-46. 

Mr. Carter 
61-62. Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training. (2 hrs.) 

An advanced study of tonal relationships, including chromatics, syncopated and difficult 
rhythms, recognition of harmonic progressions, including simple modulations. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
6$. Counterpoint. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles of contrapuntal harmonization in two, three, and four parts, and 
the practical application of counterpoint in the form of invention. 

Mr. Carter 
66. Orchestration. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the beginning principles of instrumentation and orchestration, including a 
thorough understanding of transposing instruments, and the problems of writing for such 
groups of instruments as are most commonly found in the average school or community 
orchestra. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
75-76. Conducting. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the technique of the baton, and the different problems to be met in conducting 
chorus, orchestra, and band; the introduction to score reading; and an opportunity for prac- 
tical experience through the conducting of the college choral and instrumental group. 
Offered only to advanced students of music. 

Mr. Carter 

83. Instrumental Technique in the Public Schools. (3 
hrs.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching instrumental music in the 
public schools. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
85. The Teaching of Music in the Schools. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching music in the grades. 

Mr. Carter 



96 Bethany College Bulletin 

86. The Teaching of Music in the Schools. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching music in junior and senior 
high schools. 

Mr. Carter 
91-92. Problems, (i hr.) 

An advanced course for major students of music, which may include methods of piano 
teaching, composition, or other problems to prepare the individual for his particular inter- 
ests in music. Offered in junior or senior year. 

Mr. Carter 

Applied Music 
15C-16C. Choir, (i hr.) 

A study of choral literature and rendition of cantatas, oratorios, and selected numbers of 
recognized merit. 

Mr. Carter 
150-160. Orchestra, (i hr.) 

Orchestral instruments in their various combinations. Study and rendition of concert 
repertoire. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
150-160. Band, (i hr.) 

Study and performance of standard band repertoire. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
2ip-22p. Piano, (i hr.) 

Technique, theory, and literature of the piano. Open to students who have some performing 
ability on the piano. Private lessons. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
210-220. Organ, (i hr.) 

Technique, theory, and literature of the organ. Open to students who have had some train- 
ing in either piano or organ. Private lessons. 

Mr. Carter 
2iv-22v. Voice, (i hr.) 

Vocal technique, theory, and literature. Open to all students with adequate native ability, 
with or without previous vocal training. Private lessons. 

Mr. Carter 

Note: Music 15C-16C, 150-160 and I5b-i6b are open for credit only to students above the 
freshman year who are properly qualified and accepted by the director. These courses may 
be repeated for full credit. 



Bethany College Bulletin 97 

Only twelve semester hours of academic work in Applied Music can be applied toward meet- 
ing the minimum requirements for the baccalaureate degree. 

ART APPRECIATION 

31-32. Introduction to Art. (3 hrs.) 

Development and character of the architecture, sculpture and painting of Egypt, Greece, 
Rome and Europe in relation to the civilization of which they are a permanent expression. 

Miss Mahaffey 
33-34. Painting. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the Italian masters of the sixteenth century, and of the leading painters of Spain 
and northern Europe. In the second semester emphasis will be on Modern Painting, with 
especial attention to the work of American artists. 

Miss Mahaffey 



EQUIPMENT AND RESOURCES 



LOCATION 



Bethany College is situated in the northern panhandle of West 
Virginia, seven miles southeast of Wellsburg on State Route 67, 
fifteen miles north of Wheeling on State Route 88, and forty-five 
miles southwest of Pittsburgh. A map indicating automobile routes 
to Bethany is printed on the inside back cover of this bulletin. A 
bus line operates on regular schedule between Bethany and Wells- 
burg. In Wellsburg connections are made with local bus lines for 
Steubenville, Ohio, Wheeling, West Virginia, and Washington, 
Pennsylvania. Good railroad connections are possible by way of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad to Steubenville, Ohio and Wellsburg, 
West Virginia, or by way of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to 
Wheeling. Bethany is eight miles from the Wheeling Ohio County 
Airport now under construction. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The College Campus — The college campus, consisting of 
about fifty acres, is located on a hilltop overlooking the beautiful 
Buffalo Creek. 

The Main College Building is an imposing structure of 
Gothic architecture and contains about forty rooms, most of 
which are used as class rooms. 

Commencement Hall — This building contains an auditorium 
which seats approximately six hundred people and has an equipped 
stage, pipe organ, and facilities for motion pictures. On the lower 
floor are class rooms and laboratories for physics as well as prac- 
tice rooms, a studio, and recitation rooms for music. 

Oglebay Hall — This hall was donated to the college by the 
late Earl W. Oglebay, of the Class of 1869. The building is used 
mainly for the teaching of the sciences. It contains chemical and 
biological lecture rooms, laboratories and supply rooms. 

Carnegie Library — A three-story library building made pos- 
sible by the gift of Andrew Carnegie in 1906, containing not only 
the collection of books and periodicals but special collections and 
treasured materials connected with the historical growth of the 
college. 



Bethany College Bulletin 99 

Irvin Gymnasium — This gymnasium was donated in 1920 by 
the Irvin family of Big Run, Pennsylvania. It is equipped with a 
swimming pool, trophy room, and running track, in addition to 
the gymnasium floor. 

Rine Recreation Field — As a memorial to the late Edwin M. 
Rine, friend and benefactor of the college, the Board of Trustees 
designated certain areas of land directly west of the campus to be 
known as the Rine Field. Facilities are now available for football, 
baseball, track, cross country, soccer, rifle range and obstacle 
course. 

Nature Trail — Margaretta Parkinson bequeathed the Parkin- 
son Farm to the college in 19 14. Through tracts of oaks, elms, 
birches, and beeches, several miles of nature trails have been con- 
structed for the use of students and friends of the college. 

Percy B. Cochran Hall — Hon. M. M. Cochran, of the Class of 
1875, donated this dormitory for men in 19 10 as a memorial to his 
son, Percy B. Cochran, of the Class of 1900. The building is four 
stories high and is built of white brick. 

Phillips Hall — This dormitory for women was originally 
donated to the college by Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, Sr., of New 
Castle, Pennsylvania. In 1930 a splendid new dormitory was com- 
pleted to replace and include the original building. There are stu- 
dent rooms for over a hundred women. In addition to the dormi- 
tory space the building provides a central dining room for all col- 
lege women and facilities for other important services of the col- 
lege. At the present time Phillips Hall is used by the Navy V-12 
Unit, and will again be occupied by women later in the coming 
year. 

Bethany House — This new dining hall for men is planned to 
provide dining facilities for men of the college and an informal so- 
cial center for the entire student body. 

Helwig House — This is a well-appointed dormitory for twenty 
five college women, named in memory of Miss Anna L. Helwig 
of Wheeling. It is operated under conditions similar to those gov- 
erning residents in Phillips Hall with a faculty resident in charge. 

Gateway Hall — This is a well-appointed dormitory for forty- 
five college women. It is operated under conditions similar to those 
governing residents in Phillips Hall with a faculty resident in 
charge. 

Residence Homes for Women — The college operates other 



ioo Bethany College Bulletin 

residence buildings for college women. Some of these are occupied 
by chapters of national sororities. 

In the present war time when the Navy V-12 unit occupies 
Phillips Hall and the enrollment of civilian men is drastically re- 
duced, young women of the college have been housed in the former 
fraternity houses and in Gay House, a large, modern, commodious 
dwelling. Each house is under the supervision of a resident who is 
responsible to the Academic Adviser for Women. 

Pendleton Heights — A short distance to the north of the 
Main Building on the campus is the home of the president of the 
college, known as Pendleton Heights. 

Cochran Central Heating Plant — The college came into 
possession of this building and its equipment through the generos- 
ity of Hon. M. M. Cochran of the Class of 1875. The college build- 
ings and the Bethany Memorial Church are heated from this 
source. 

College Farm and Farm Buildings — Through the generosity 
of the late E. W. Oglebay of the Class of 1869, Bethany College 
owns the Alexander Campbell farm of 205 acres. By deed bearing 
date of April 7, 1914, Miss Margaretta E. Parkinson gave to the 
college the farm of 251 acres adjoining the college campus on the 
north. The Point Breeze Farm was purchased in 1937. Other hold- 
ings of the college bring the total land owned to over one thousand 
acres. 

LIBRARIES 

Library and Reading Room Equipment — The Bethany Col- 
lege Library contains more than 40,700 volumes of carefully se- 
lected books and periodicals designed primarily to meet the needs 
of the students of an undergraduate liberal arts college, approxi- 
mately 5,000 volumes of unbound periodicals and a large collection 
of vertical file material and government documents. The Library 
subscribes to one hundred and eighty-three periodicals and nine 
newspapers including, in normal times, three foreign language 
papers. 

INSTRUCTIONAL EQUIPMENT 

Biology Laboratories — The biology laboratories and confer- 
ence rooms are located on the first floor of Oglebay Hall. The lab- 
oratories are adequately equipped to take care of courses in 



Bethany College Bulletin ioi 

general biology, plant morphology, as well as physiology, bac- 
teriology, comparative anatomy, embryology, and histology. 

Chemical Laboratories — These laboratories occupy the sec- 
ond and third floors of Oglebay Hall. They consist of a general 
laboratory, an analytical laboratory, and separate laboratories 
for organic and physical chemistry, a spectroscopic laboratory, 
balance room, and a small machine shop. 

Physics Laboratories — The rooms used for physics labora- 
tories are located on the first floor of the Main Building and of 
Commencement Hall. They include not only the equipment for 
elementary courses in physics, but also for advanced work in spec- 
troscopy, radio, electronics, and similar branches. A small observa- 
tory is located on the southwest corner of the campus, equipped 
with an electrically operated telescope. 

Psychological Laboratory — The laboratory for experimental 
psychology is located on the second floor of the Main Building, 
in connection with the psychology lecture room. It is equipped 
for individual work in elementary experimental psychology and 
some phases of applied psychology. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 

One of the expressed aims of the college is "To provide higher 
education in an atmosphere sympathetic to Christian ideals and 
Christian faith and to conserve and develop the moral character 
and religious life of its students." This aim is meant to bear upon 
instruction, counseling, and social life as well as formal religious 
services. 

Convocation — A fifty minute convocation is held each Tues- 
day and Thursday at eleven o'clock. Most services are devotional. 
Lectures by faculty members and noted visitors, drama, music and 
student presentations are the most frequent elements of the con- 
vocation service. Attendance is obligatory for all students. The 
convocation service is non-sectarian. 

The College Church — All students regardless of denomina- 
tional affiliations are welcome as "Student Members" of the Beth- 
any Memorial Church. One of the active organizational groups of 
the church is the Council on Student work through which are co- 
ordinated the various religious activities of the student body. Op- 
portunity of personal counseling with the minister is offered. 

Instruction — Since its inception, the Bible has been a recog- 
nized textbook in the college and each student is asked to pursue 
this study for at least one year. The approach is intended to be 
sympathetic and constructive. 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

One of the privileges of the student body of Bethany College is 
that of hearing outstanding lectures, musicians, and leaders of 
thought. During the current year there have appeared before the 
student body sixteen speakers from off the campus and nine 
musical soloists and ensembles. 

SPECIAL DAYS 

Scholar's Day — Each year a special convocation is held for the 
recognition of outstanding academic achievement by individual 
students and student groups. 

Play Day for High School Girls — On Saturday in the late 



Bethany College Bulletin 103 

spring the Department of Physical Education invites girls from 
many nearby high schools to a Play Day. 

Vocational Conference — A weekend program is planned for 
the young women of the college. At this time women leaders in 
various vocations are brought to the campus for conference with 
the women students on vocational problem and possibilities. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student Board of Governors — As a means of governing and 
directing student interest and student activities, the Student 
Board of Governors is maintained by the student body as a legis- 
lative and executive body. Matters pertaining to athletics, debat- 
ing, student publications, social affairs, and general student inter- 
ests are given attention. 

Athletics — In order to supplement the courses in physical edu- 
cation which are required of all freshmen and sophomores who are 
found upon examination to be physically able to carry the work, 
Bethany College maintains intramural and intercollegiate teams 
in many sports. 

Bethany has taken a position of leadership among tri-state col- 
leges by its established athletic policy, which eliminates all pro- 
fessionalism from its program. Intercollegiate competition in foot- 
ball, basketball, tennis, cross-country, track and field continues. 
An intramural program has been developed in order to provide 
opportunity for all to participate in some form of athletic en- 
deavor. Sports which are provided for on the intramural program 
are soccer, volleyball, swimming, archery, tennis, Softball, hand- 
ball, hockey, basketball, and touch football. 

Students participating in intramural and intercollegiate ath- 
letics do so at their own risk. While the college assumes no respon- 
sibility for accidents or injuries of any kind, experienced coaches 
are provided and every precaution is taken to avoid hazards. Stu- 
dents are expected to have a complete physical examination each 
season. 

Association of Women Students — This Association, of which 
every woman student is automatically a member upon her en- 
trance into college, has as its main purpose the building of larger 
and wider life attitudes through giving the college woman a fuller 
opportunity for experience in leadership and for sharing with the 
college the responsibility for her conduct. 



104 Bethany College Bulletin 

Women's Athletic Association — The Women's Athletic As- 
sociation encourages and fosters the participation of all women of 
the college in swimming, the dance, and many different sports and 
games. The Athletic Board of the W. A. A. is made up of sports 
leaders of the college. 

Student Publications — Under the management of the Stu- 
dent Board of Publications the students publish the "Bethanian," 
issued at spaced intervals in magazine form to be compiled through- 
out the year into a final yearbook form. 

The students also print twice a week a small one-sheet publica- 
tion called "Tell" in which is published up-to-the-minute news of 
campus activities. 

The student fee covers the cost of these publications and every 
student is entitled to a copy of each issue. 

Ministerial Association — This association is made up of the 
young men of the student body who are preparing for the work of 
the Christian ministry. 

Y.W.C.A. — Membership in the Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation is open to all women students. This organization strives 
to serve religious, aesthetic, and social needs by conducting regular 
worship services, entertaining guest speakers from various fields, 
and sponsoring discussion groups concerning campus and personal 
problems. 

Clubs and Societies — The following clubs and societies are 
sponsored by the various departments of the College: the Chemis- 
try Club, the French Club, the German Club, the Spanish Club, 
the International Relations Club, the Psychology Club, the Sociol- 
ogy Club, and the Writers' Club. 

The H. T. McKinney Chapter of the Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica was chartered at the college in the fall of 1942. 

Fraternities — Several of the strong Greek letter fraternities 
have chapters at Bethany. The fraternities for men are: Beta 
Theta Pi, Sigma Nu, Phi Kappa Tau, Kappa Alpha, and Alpha 
Kappa Pi. The sororities for women are: Alpha Xi Delta, Zeta Tau 
Alpha, Kappa Delta, and Phi Mu. All have national affiliation. 

MUSIC AND DRAMATICS 

College Choir — This mixed chorus of thirty-six voices sings 
each Sunday morning at Bethany Memorial Church, and gives 



Bethany College Bulletin 105 

special programs, in and away from Bethany. Membership is 
open to all students accepted by the director. 

College Orchestra — This musical organization is made up of 
students who have proficiency on orchestral instruments. Admis- 
sion is gained by satisfactorily passing an individual examination 
given by the director. 

College Band — The college band is open to all students who 
show by individual examination a sufficient mastery of their in- 
strument for the type of music to be played. 

Dramatics — The program of drama enjoys a prominent place in 
the life of the college. Two clubs constitute the nuclei of play pro- 
duction : The Bethespian of open membership ; and a chapter of the 
national dramatic fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, in which students 
may become members by meeting the national requirements. 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Student Scholarship — The average size of the classes as or- 
ganized enables the instructors to give each student individual at- 
tention; in many cases classes are divided into several sections to 
secure this result. At stated times students whose work in any de- 
partment is unsatisfactory are reported to the Admissions and 
Personnel Office by the instructor in charge of the work in ques- 
tion. 

Classification of Students — The classification of students is 
determined at the beginning of each year according to the follow- 
ing plan: for sophomore rank a student must have at least twenty- 
five hours of academic credit and twenty-five quality points. Ad- 
mission to the upper division or full junior standing is conditioned 
upon the student's having at least sixty hours of academic credit, 
sixty quality points, freshman orientation completed, and he must 
have passed the sophomore general examination. For senior class 
rank the student must have at least ninety-four hours of academic 
credit and ninety-four quality points, and have completed all pre- 
scribed courses for graduation. 

No student is considered a candidate for the baccalaureate de- 
gree until granted senior classification. 

The Grading System — The class standing of a student in 
courses pursued is reported by the use of letters. The meaning of 
letters used may be given as follows: 



106 Bethany College Bulletin 

A, Excellent — 3 quality points for each hour of credit. 

B, Good — 2 quality points for each hour of credit. 

C, Average — 1 quality point for each hour of credit. 

D, Inferior — Hour credits but not quality points given. 

con., Conditional Failure. The student is granted the privilege of 
taking an examination to remove the condition, or, in case 
of a continuous course, it may be automatically removed by 
the student making a grade of C or better the following 
semester. Failure to do so within the following semester will 
result in the grade being changed to F. Regardless of the 
manner of removing the condition no higher grade than D 
will be allowed. 

inc., This abbreviation denotes uncompleted work as a result of 
sickness or some other justifiable reason. An incomplete 
mark should be removed by the end of the fourth week of 
following semester, unless an extension of time is granted. 
It is not possible for a student to remove an incomplete 
mark after twelve months. 
F, Failure. The letter F denotes work that is definitely unsatis- 
factory and the course not passed. 
W, Withdrawn. The mark WF means that the student was 
failing at the time of withdrawal, and WP means that he 
was passing at the time of withdrawal. 

A report of the scholastic standing of students is received at the 
office of Admissions and Personnel at the mid-semester time in ad- 
dition to the final semester reports. These reports are sent to the 
faculty counselor of each student and to parents or guardian. 

Probation — The term "on probation" is applied to students 
who are continued in college after having failed to satisfy academic 
requirements to a proper degree, or who, by reason of deportment, 
do not meet the standards expected by faculty and administration. 

A student shall be placed on probation for one semester if in the 
semester preceding he has failed to pass in nine hours of regular 
college work and earn at least six quality points. He shall be con- 
tinued on probation until the end of that semester. If he passes in 
twelve hours of college work and earns twelve quality points in the 
semester, he may be removed from probation. 

If he fails to pass twelve hours and earn twelve quality points, 
he can not be continued except by action of the Committee on Ad- 
missions and the recommendation of his faculty counselor. It is 



Bethany College Bulletin 107 

understood that one semester on probation is to be the limit and 
that it is not the intention of the faculty to have students continue 
in college if they do not do satisfactory academic work. Only in un- 
usual cases will a student be continued if he fails to meet the re- 
quirement set for probation students. 

A student who fails to pass in less than six hours of academic 
work in any one semester can not be continued into the next semes- 
ter. In case of unusual circumstances the Committee on Admis- 
sions may grant permission for the student to continue one semes- 
ter on probation or to be continued as an unclassified student. 

During the period of probation a student may be limited in his 
academic schedule, in participation in extra-curricular activities, 
or in social life. Such limitation may be imposed by his faculty 
counselor or by any proper officer of administration. The determi- 
nation of actual eligibility to participate in intercollegiate or ex- 
tra-curricular activities shall rest with the counselor and the Com- 
mittee on Admissions and Classifications. 

Provisional Enrollment — The term "provisional enroll- 
ment" is applied to the status of students who are permitted to en- 
roll for a provisional period of two weeks pending the receipt of 
secondary school record, the payment of the required amount on 
account, or pending the fulfillment of any other proper require- 
ment of the administration. This is intended to cover the cases 
with which the Dean of Students, the Committee on Admissions 
and Classifications, or the Bursar have to deal. 

Penalty for Late Registration — Students in attendance 
during any semester must register on the opening day of the follow- 
ing semester, if they desire to continue their work. For the first 
three days two dollars is charged for each day of delay in registra- 
tion and class absences will be counted against the student for all 
days missed. This rule does not relate to students entering for their 
first semester. 

Student's Schedule — A student ordinarily carries fifteen or 
sixteen credit hours of academic work each semester but it is pos- 
sible for a student to carry additional credit hours with the permis- 
sion of his counselor and the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications. Under the accelerated program a normal load is 
increased to eighteen hours. It is ordinarily expected that no stu- 
dent will carry more than nineteen credit hours in any one semes- 
ter. 



108 , Bethany College Bulletin 

Courses should not be changed or dropped except within the 
first week at the start of any one semester. In special cases a change 
can be made in courses or schedule with the consent of the instruc- 
tors concerned, the student's counselor, and the Dean of the Fac- 
ulty. After the first week it is possible for a student to drop a course 
only if the counselor and the Dean feel that the best interests of 
the student will be served by such a procedure. Students are not 
permitted to drop any course without adequate reason and ap- 
proval. 

Class Absences — Students are expected to attend all class or 
laboratory meetings of a course and to participate in any outside 
activities which are a part of the course. The final decision as to 
approving absences which may be required because of illness or 
urgent matters of any kind is in the hands of the Dean of the Fac- 
ulty and, in case of illness, the college doctor or the college nurse. 
Proper penalities or requirements may be imposed by any instruc- 
tor for absences of any kind. 

Students of superior ability and achievement are often allowed 
much freedom in the matter of class attendance and specific re- 
quirements. 

Withdrawal — An honorable discharge will be granted to any 
student who is in good academic standing and is not subject to 
discipline, who may desire to withdraw from the college, if he has 
satisfied his counselor and a responsible officer of the college, that 
there is a good reason to justify such action. Students asking to 
withdraw should present such a request to the counselor with a 
written statement of approval from parent or guardian. The rec- 
ommendation of the counselor should then be presented to the 
Provost for final approval and record. No withdrawal will be con- 
sidered complete until this action has been taken. 

Special Examinations — A student who has been marked Con- 
ditional (Con) in a course at the end of a semester may, with the 
consent of the instructor, be given an opportunity to take a second 
final examination on the payment of a fee of $2.00. Fees for special 
final examinations and other regularly scheduled tests must be 
paid at the office of the Bursar before the examinations are taken. 
The Bursar's receipt must be presented to the instructor at the 
time of the examination and delivered by the instructor to the 
Recorder together with the grade given the student. 

The fee for special examinations may be remitted by the Dean 



Bethany College Bulletin 109 

of the Faculty in which case his approval must be secured in lieu 
of the statement from the Bursar's office. 

Report of the Student's Progress— At any time parents or 
guardians are free to request further information concerning the 
development, ability, and progress of a student. Requests should 
be made to the Provost or the Recorder. 

Advance Enrollment — All students of the college are obliged 
to fill out advance enrollment blanks indicating the courses of 
study planned for the coming year. In the case of freshmen, these 
courses are selected under the direction of the freshman counselors. 
In the case of students who have selected a major, the professor in 
charge of the department elected will counsel regarding the stu- 
dent's curriculum. 

Transfer of Records — Students wishing to transfer from 
Bethany College to another institution should request the Admis- 
sions and Personnel Office to send an official transcript of record 
and notice of honorable dismissal, giving notice of at least one 
week. One transrcipt is furnished for each student without charge; 
for each additional record a fee of one dollar is charged; this fee to 
be sent to the office with the request. All financial obligations to 
the college must be paid before a transcript can be issued. 

Fraternity and Sorority Initiation — Students shall not be 
initiated into any fraternity or sorority until they have satisfied 
entrance requirements of the college, have fifteen hours of resident 
collegiate work credited on the college books, and have earned at 
least fifteen resident quality points. 

Junior Year Abroad — Specially qualified students may substi- 
tute for the work of the junior year in the college a year of study 
in France or in Germany, under the supervision of the Foreign 
Study Plan of the University of Delaware. This plan has been sus- 
pended for the duration of the war by order of the State Depart- 
ment. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

Medical and Physical Examination — A medical and physical 
examination of every new student is made during the first weeks 
of the college year by the college physician. It is strongly recom- 
mended that all students be examined at least once each year by 
the family physician and dentist. All students are expected to be 
vaccinated and to have tuberculin and blood tests either at home 
or at the college dispensary. 



no Bethany College Bulletin 

Vaccination — All applicants for admission must have been 
vaccinated within the past three years, or they must arrange to be 
vaccinated by the Student Health Service within one month after 
entrance unless excused by the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications. 

Physical Education — All freshman and sophomore students 
are required to take activities courses in physical education and a 
course of lectures in personal hygiene. An elementary course in 
mental hygiene is offered as an elective in the Department of Edu- 
cation. These courses carry regular college credit. 

Sickness — Each student is expected to report to the college 
dispensary in case of sickness of any kind. In the case of con- 
tagious or infectious disease, students will be expected to give ab- 
solute observance to any regulations which may be prescribed by 
the college officers or the county health officials. 

The college physician is at the dispensary each day for consulta- 
tion, examination, and treatment. Students are urged to report all 
injuries, diseases, or untoward symptoms, no matter how trivial 
they may seem. No extensive medical or surgical procedures are 
carried out at the dispensary but all minor ailments will be cared 
for, and some medicines will be supplied. Arrangements can be 
made for vaccinations, cold serums, and special treatment. The 
college physician is available for consultation and professional 
service without charge only at the dispensary. 

Students are required to report all illnesses which entail ab- 
sences from 8:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. classes to the house hostess 
or faculty resident before 9:00 a.m. The hostess will call the col- 
lege nurse at the dispensary and inform the nurse if the student is 
unable to report there. Students may not call to request nursing 
services outside the dispensary. They should clear these matters 
through the house hostess, faculty resident or officials of the col- 
lege^ 

Dispensary hours are daily except Sunday 10:00 a.m. to n :oo 
a.m. Daily except Saturday and Sunday, 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Sunday, 1 130 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 

Students are free to employ either the college physician or a 
physician of their own choice in any case of illness. Other well 
trained physicians are available in Wellsburg and Wheeling. 

Infirmary — The college infirmary in charge of the college nurse 
and her assistant is maintained while college is in session. It in- 



Bethany College Bulletin hi 

eludes the doctor's office, treatment room, medicine room, and 
wards for men and women. The infirmary is not open for dispen- 
sary service, diagnosis or treatment, and the services of the college 
physician are not available there without charge. It is intended 
only for bed-patients. The college nurse is in charge of the infirm- 
ary and is available at all hours at the college dispensary or in- 
firmary for emergencies, but she is not subject to call for minor 
matters, dispensary service, or any services that can be cared for 
at the college dispensary during regular office hours. Situations 
calling for special attention elsewhere should be reported to the 
resident or house hostess or an official of the college. If special 
professional services are required the costs of the same will be at 
the expense of the student. In case of need each student is entitled 
to three days of care in the infirmary with no additional charge. 
For periods in excess of this time a nominal charge of $>i.po per 
day is made. Students not boarding in college dining halls will be 
charged $1.00 per day for board during the period of hospitaliza- 
tion. 

SOCIAL REGULATIONS 

Student Residence — No student in any college year shall be 
permitted to reside or board in any place which has not been listed 
as approved. Fraternity and sorority houses, private dwellings, 
and dormitory rooms where students are living, must at all times 
be open for inspection and appraisal as to influences and conditions 
relating to morals, health, and social culture. All freshmen are re- 
quired to live in the college dormitories through the entire first 
year. 

Social Life — The men and women of the college meet under 
conditions intended to provide a pleasant and wholesome social 
life. A reasonable amount of social recreation is encouraged, 
though such diversion is restricted within limits considered most 
favorable to the welfare of the students. It is understood and ex- 
pected that all students will observe the usual social conventions 
and individual students will be governed by discretion and regard 
for propriety, without the existence of minute and specific rules. 
Immorality, drinking, or other gross misconduct on the part of 
students may result in immediate suspension or dismissal from the 
college. 

The women of the college live either in Phillips Hall, Gateway 



H2 Bethany College Bulletin 

Hall or in sorority houses. Each is presided over by a house 
hostess or a faculty resident. The Academic Adviser for Women 
is in charge of the general supervision of the college women, with 
the direct responsibility for regulation of social life, residence and 
social privileges, etc., in charge of the Head of Residence for 
Women. 

All student organizations are required to obtain permission from 
the Head of Residence for Women before giving an entertainment 
or function of any kind either on or off the campus. A social calen- 
dar is kept in her office in which all public functions must be regis- 
tered in advance. 

Student Conduct — In the administration of college regula- 
tions it is the policy of the administration to be guided in the treat- 
ment of the individual cases largely by the recommendtaion of the 
student's counselor and by the general attitude of the student 
toward the college, i.e., whether or not he has proved himself a 
creditable member of the college community, as shown by regular- 
ity in attendance, promptness in the fulfillment of his obligations, 
earnestness in his endeavors to profit by the college opportunities, 
and in consideration of high standards in social and moral conduct. 

The whole record of each student will be reviewed at the end of 
each semester with reference to his conduct in the community as 
well as his academic attainments. It is expected that a student 
who earns credits at Bethany College must satisfy the faculty as 
to uprightness of character as well as accomplishments in scholar- 
ship. If the student's conduct has been unsatisfactory and is likely 
to remain so, the administration will consider whether the student 
is justifying his candidacy for a college degree. Students who do 
not show promise of accomplishment will not be allowed to con- 
tinue. 

It is earnestly desired that undergraduates may be influenced to 
good conduct and good scholarship by higher motives than fear of 
punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the courtesy and gener- 
ous feeling natural to young men and women engaged in liberal 
pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of conduct. It is the 
policy of the college administration and faculty to allow in all 
things as much liberty as will not be abused, and the students are 
invited and expected to cooperate with the faculty and college 
officers. Students are also answerable for their conduct during 
vacation. 



Bethany College Bulletin 113 

There is no need for students to maintain automobiles in Beth- 
any and they have proved a detriment to scholarship and a temp- 
tation to waste time. The maintenance of an automobile or motor- 
cycle in Bethany or vicinity without the permission of the college 
faculty is positively forbidden. 

Changes in Regulation Covering Courses of Study, De- 
grees, Discipline, Etc. — The college administration reserves the 
right to amend the regulations covering the granting of degrees, 
the courses of study, and the conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of a degree are privileges, not 
rights. The college reserves the right, and the student concedes to 
the college the right, to require the withdrawal of any student at 
any time without explanation or trial. 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN COURSE 

On October ii, 1944 

Bachelor of Arts 

Summa Cum Laude 
Evelyn Sabolia 

Magna Cum Laude 
Jeanne Jordan 

Cum Laude 

Beverly Barnes Shirley Skilton 

Mary Virginia Joseph Mary Wilkin 

Rite 

Elizabeth Bannen Harriet Kolson 

Gladys Brooks Elaine Landgrebe 

Frank Buechley Esther McCracken 

Barbara Chapman Jean Rylander 

LeRoy Hall Janet Whetstone 
Ruth Judy 

Bachelor of Science 

Summa Cum Laude 
Esther McCandless 

Magna Cum Laude 
Rita Ganz Herman Steinberg 

Cum Laude 

Robert Stealey 

Rite 
Harold Carstensen * Frank Reusche" 

John Padden Nancy Tomasek 

Anthony Puglisi * 
* In Absentia. 

SENIORS PASSING COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 
WITH DISTINCTION OCTOBER 1944 

Beverly Barnes Music 

Rita Ganz Biology 

Jeanne Jordan English 

Mary Virginia Joseph. History 

Esther McCandless Biology 

Evelyn Sabolia French 

Robert Stealey Biology 

Herman Steinberg Chemistry 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN COURSE 

On February i8, 1945 
Bachelor of Arts 

Summa Cum Laude 
Herta Sylvia Lehrer 

Rite 
Leland Davis Betty Shaffer 

Charlotte Gay Marilyn Waugh 

Velma Rimko 

Bachelor of Science 

Cum Laude 

Arthur Beard* 
Reuben Ott 

Rite 

Dorothy Bright 
Mary Buccieri 
Emmet Moyers, Jr.* 
* In Absentia. 

SENIORS PASSING COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 
WITH DISTINCTION FEBRUARY 1945 

Arthur Beard Chemistry 

Herta Sylvia Lehrer Psychology 

Reuben Ott Chemistry 

IVJarilyn Waugh Sociology 

The two groups of students graduated on October ii y 1944 and 
on February 18, 1945 together with the group to be graduated at 
the Annual Commencement on June 19, 1945 will compose the 
Class of 1945 and will be so listed on the records of the college. 



ROSTER OF STUDENTS 

i 944-1 945 
Seniors 

Ball, Patricia 633 Main Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Bannen, Elizabeth 223 Isabella Street, Oakmont, Pa. 

Barnes, Beverly 21 18 Commerce Street, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Bright, Dorothy 15611 Walden Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 

Bright, Martha May R.F.D. 1, Verona Road, Verona, Pa. 

Brooks, Gladys 602 Edna Street, Connellsville, Pa. 

Buccieri, Mary 900 Brookline Blvd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Buechley, Frank Box 541, R.F.D. 3, Johnstown, Pa. 

Burns, Marion 24 DeKalb Street, Tonawanda, N.Y. 

Chapman, Barbara 605 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pa. 

Chason, Alvin 115A West 168 Street, New York 58, N.Y. 

Cowen, Nancy 3%33 Highland Avenue, Shadyside, Ohio 

Flint, Janet Martha Road, Harrington Park, N.J. 

Foley, Betty. 4246 Franklin Street, Bellaire, Ohio 

Galm, June 58 Elm Avenue, Floral Park, N.Y. 

Ganz, Rita., 80 Avenue P, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Gay, Charlotte Bethany, W.Va. 

*Gilbert, Pauline Bethany, W.Va. 

Golden, Helen 2201 Richland Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Goss, Aimee 2213 Vance Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Grimshaw, Eugenia 101 Wayne Street, Aliquippa, Pa. 

Harrington, Nancy Pleasant Avenue, R.F.D. 3, Hamburg, N.Y. 

Harvey, Alice 305 15th Street, N.E., Washington 2, D.C. 

Hutchinson, Harry. 1419 Columbus Avenue, Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Ishino, Sakaye 7-3 -A Rohwer Relocation Branch, McGehee, Ark. 

Jones, Betty R 51 LaSalle Avenue, Kenmore, N.Y. 

Jones, Katherine Box 632 Grove Road, Pittsburgh 10, Pa. 

Jordan, Jeanne 720 Valley View Road, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Joseph, Virginia 121 St. James Place, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Judy, Ruth 120 Bell Avenue, Dover, Ohio 

Kammen, Harold 212 West 85th Street, New York 24, N.Y. 

Karp, Olga Sheridan Lane, Boonton, N.J. 

Kolson, Harriet. 325 79th Street, North Bergen, N.J. 

Kruse, Carol 146 81st Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Landgrebe, Elaine 1857 Burnette Avenue, East Cleveland, Ohio 

Lazear, Isa 1600 Denniston Avenue, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

Lehrer, Sylvia 31-82 36th Street, Astonia, Long Island City, N.Y. 

Michaels, Rhoda East Chateau, Woodmere Blvd., Long Island, N.Y. 

Miles, Phyllis 116 Moore Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Myers, Julian Center Avenue, Burgettstown, Pa. 

McCandless, Esther Box 37, Bolivar, Pa. 

McCrackcn, Esther 112 Pennsylvania Avenue, Cameron, W.Va. 



Bethany College Bulletin 117 

Opie, Martha 1540 Asbury Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Padden, John 843 Hanover Street, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Perry, Virginia 501 Duquesne Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Reske, Betty Ann 3 120 Wabash Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Reusche, Frank 2130 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 

Rimko, Velma 603 Romine Avenue, McKeesport, Pa. 

Rodgers, Ruth Bethany, W.Va. 

Rose, Barbara Kate 511 South Niagara Street, Tonawanda, N.Y. 

Rylander, Jean Country Club Road, Fairmont, W.Va. 

Sabol, Evelyn 3050 Orchard Street, Weirton, W.Va. 

Schwab, Willi 2424 Pine Avenue, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Shaffer, Betty 473 Carnegie Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Shankroff, Dorris 857 Park Place, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Skilton, Shirley Strong Terrace, Winsted, Conn. 

Steinberg, Herman 200 Northland Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Stewart, Virginia 119 Nicholas Street, Clarksburg, W.Va. 

Todd, Annabelle 59 Stuyvesant Avenue, Larchmont, N.Y. 

Tomasek, Nancy R.F.D. 4, Box 182B, Uniontown, Pa. 

Wagner, Ruth Burkham Court, Elm Grove, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Waugh, Marilyn. R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Weimer, Margaret Bethany, W.Va. 

Whestone, Janet Forest Avenue, Hopwood, Pa. 

Whitehead, Nancy Harrison City Road, Manor, Pa. 

Woodhouse, Betty Bethany, W.Va. 

Wright, Frances Wilson Mills Road, South Euclid, Ohio 

Young, J. Donald 805 Charles Street, Carnegie, Pa. 

Juniors 

Alexander, Jeanne R.F.D. 1, Box 421, Turtle Creek, Pa 

Brendlin, Velma 3704 Bowne Street, Flushing, N.Y. 

Brown, Anne 762 Lebanon Avenue, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Bryan, Evelyn 804 Market Street, Toronto, Ohio 

Coners, Margaret 40 Oakland Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

*Culley, Marion Bethany, W.Va. 

Davidson, Marjorie 347 East Liberty Street, Girard, Ohio 

Edgar, Mary 365 South Atlantic Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ellis, Jean 1813 Virginia Street, Moundsville, W.Va. 

Fagan, Patricia 500 West End Avenue, New York 24, N.Y. 

Fowler, Jean 45 Union Avenue, Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Gallagher, Doris 148 37th Street, Union City, N.J. 

*Germon, Sara R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Gibson, Gladys Carnahan Bethany, W.Va. 

Harries, Elizabeth 1333 Arlington Avenue, Steubenville, Ohio 

Harvey, Carolyn 298 Cherry Street, Naugatuck, Conn. 

Houghton, Winifred Box 152 Dodd Street, Middlebourne, W.Va. 

Humphrey, Shirley Main Street, Tiltonsville, Ohio 

Jameson, Lois 73 Koster Row, Eggertsville, N.Y. 

Jewell, Richard Belleview Heights, Bellaire, Ohio 



1 1 8 Bethany College Bulletin 



Kenny, Benjamin 850 Country Club Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Kerfoot, Frances 511 Lebanon Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Lancaster, La'Reva 75°6 Church Avenue, Ben Avon, Pa. 

Marron, Lorraine 30 Crescent Avenue, Babylon, N.Y. 

Mikels, Beverly 318 Sumner Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Monzcynski, Dorothy 58 Decker Street, Buffalo, N.Y. 

McMullen, Jane 10 Franklin Avenue, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Northrup, George Bethany, W.Va. 

Phillips, Irving 1677 Weston Avenue, Youngs town, Ohio 

Rankin, Janet 15 10 Vance Avenue, Coraopolis, Pa. 

Rauscher, Mary 19 Pearl Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Repp, Frances R.F.D. 2, New Kensington, Pa. 

Saeltzer, Doris 219 Bronx River Road, Yonkers, N.Y. 

Scheer, Robert 2280 Loring Place, New York 53, N.Y. 

Smith, Robert 360 Franklin Street, Marion, Ohio 

Steiniger, Dan 709 Warwood Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Stevenson, Altha R.F.D. 4, McDonald, Pa. 

Stuart, Mary 107 Fahnestock Road, Aspinwall, Pa. 

Taylor, Jean 265 Rye Beach Avenue, Rye, N.Y. 

Teater, Marjorie 130 South Park Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Truxal, Louise Box 1 $6> Manor, Pa. 

Waugh, Patricia R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Williams, Juanita 3713 Highland Avenue, Shadyside, Ohio 

Wilson, Joan 519 Tenth Street, Moundsville, W.Va. 

Winski, Marjorie 1915 Main Street, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Sophomores 

Ammon, Emma Lou 4 America Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Baker, Betty Lou 906 North Hickory Street, Scottdale, Pa. 

Benedic t, David Bethany, W.Va. 

Bode, Doris 134 Hemphill Street, N.S. Pittsburgh 14, Pa. 

Cain, Anaruth 119 Wayne Street, Claysville, Pa. 

Chambers, Margaret Ann 1030 Main Street, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Clark, Marjorie 16850 Santa Rosa Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

D'Aliberti, Alfred 13 18 Park Street, Steuvenville, Ohio 

Dodd, Jean Brilliant, Ohio 

Eaton, Aimee 2106 Sunset Blvd., Steubenville, Ohio 

Fannin, Donald 1920 McCauslen Manor, Steuvenville, Ohio 

Fitch, Malcolm 1524 Westwood Avenue, Lakewood, Ohio 

Flaherty, Margaret 44 Sheridan Avenue, Bellevue 2, Pa. 

Fletcher, Louise Highland Park, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Fowler, Julia 45 Union Avenue, Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Frisch, Alan 54 Evelyn Place, New York S3, N.Y. 

Furber, Dorothea 223 Berkley Place, Brooklyn 17, N.Y. 

Galati, Dennis 117 {Stanhope Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Gibbons, Rita 21600 Roberts Avenue, Euclid, Ohio 

Golden, Gordon 2201 Richland Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 



Bethany College Bulletin 119 

Gordon, Mary Josephine 125 Linden Avenue, Pittsburgh 18, Pa. 

Gutierrez, Josephine Garcia , 134 Eleanor Street, Langeloth, Pa. 

Heinlein, Bernice 423 Hill Street, Sistersville, W.Va. 

Henshaw, Dorcas R.F.D. 1, Box 44, Uniontown, Pa. 

Kahn, Stephen 513 South Huron Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Kallman, Burton 2719 Morris Avenue, New York 58, N.Y. 

Kerr, Betty Jane 1 1406 Frankstown Road, Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

Koller, Millicent 4989 Atcheson Road, Bellaire, Ohio 

Levet, Shirley l 74&3 Clifton Blvd., Lakewood, Ohio 

Loose, Pauline Leesport, Pa. 

Mason, Shirley 77 18th Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Nawotka, Amelia 23 Sherman Street, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Neumeister, Alice 345 Washington Blvd., Orrville, Ohio 

Ott, Patricia 68 St. Johns Avenue, Kenmore, N.Y. 

Pardew, Betty Lee 1562 Tolma Avenue, Dormont, Pa. 

Parker, Carolyn 118^ Marietta Street, St. Clairsville, Ohio 

Perez, Elsie 312 West 98th Street, New York, N.Y. 

Powell, Jean Main Street, Brilliant, Ohio 

Pushkarow, Dorothy 231 49th Street, Union City, N.J. 

Quen, Jacques 1064 Carroll Place, New York $6> N.Y. 

Rebholz, Ruth. . . 109 Main Entrance Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Reuther, Betty 1056 Broadway, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Risberg, Marjorie J 53 2 4 Clifton Blvd., Lakewood, Ohio 

Rittner, Lynette .363 Linden Avenue, East Aurora, N.Y. 

Rogers, Elaine 527 Chestnut Street, Scottdale, Pa. 

Rohlf, Eleanor 803 Ninth Street, S.W., Massillon, Ohio 

Rowland, Dorothy. 527 Midland Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Santiago, Edna. . 733 Kelly Street, Bronx, N.Y. 

Schoonmaker, Lois 717 Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio 

Scott, Norma Jean Rogersville, Pa. 

Shaffer, Joan 473 Carnegie Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Sheline, E. Richard , 3738 Stannard Drive, Toledo, Ohio 

Sheline, Robert 3738 Stannard Drive, Toledo, Ohio 

Shoemaker, Virginia Sylvan Place, Haworth, N. J. 

Slobodkin, Lawrence 106 West 69th Street, New York 23, N.Y. 

Smith, Betty Jean 290 North Wells Street, Sistersville, W.Va. 

Smith, Katherine 30 Maryland Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Snyder, Mary 340 Beach 91st Street, Rockaway Beach, N.Y. 

Spiegel, Hans 99-58 66th Avenue, Forest Hills. N.Y, 

Stacko, Mary . .R.F.D. 2, Avella, Pa. 

Stimmel, Thomas 1 89 Franklin Avenue, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Truman, Betty Lee 241 McClelland town Road, Uniontown, Pa. 

Turnamian, Virginia .4528 Hudson Avenue, Union City, N.J. 

Unger, Barbara 345 East 58th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 

Vogt, Shirley 29 South Willow Street, East Aurora, N.Y. 

Wancheck, Ann House 96, Bobtown, Pa. 

Weinrich, Marcel 1434 Morris Avenue, New York $6> N.Y. 

Wells, Arthur. . . Newell, W.Va. 



120 Bethany College Bulletin 

Wohrley, Melville Fairview Road, Box 791, Newark, Ohio 

Zettler, Howard 44 Florence Avenue, Norwood, Mass. 

Zinsmeister, Thelma 1521 Grandin Avenue, Dormont, Pa. 

Freshmen 

Albertsen, Robert 206 West Eighth Avenue, Huntington, W.Va. 

Allen, Patricia 608 Greendale Avenue, Edgewood, Pa. 

Ames, Dorothea 27 Norma Place, Buffalo 14, N.Y. 

Ashworth, Marguerite Great Barrington, Mass. 

Aull, Helen 403 Union Avenue, Ingram, Pa. 

Baldwin, Constance 104 Bixley Heath, Lynbrook, N.Y. 

Barnard, Betty Jo The Meadows, Claysville, Pa. 

Baumgarten, Irene 511 West 113th Street, New York 25, N.Y. 

Bell, Anna Marie Box 346, R.F.D. 1, McKeesport, Pa. 

Belli, Florence in Bergen Avenue, Clifton, N.J. 

Bendler, Pauline. 16607 Parkside Avenue, Detroit 21, Mich. 

Benson, Thamar Seventh Street, New Kensington, Pa. 

Bishop, Geraldine 345 East 36th Street, Paterson, N.J. 

Blaschak, Veronica 914 Bank Street, Toronto, Ohio 

Broderick, Patricia 6017 Buffalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Buchanan, Lizabeth R.F.D. 4, Bethlehem, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Burig, Betty 103 Main Street, Claysville, Pa. 

Burton, Donna Beth. 15 Cumberland Road, Glen Rock, N.J. 

Butterworth, Betty Ann 405 Franklin Avenue, Nutley, N.J. 

Byers, Mary Margaret 19 Warden Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Cambeis, Marjorie 246 Battery Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Clemens, Virginia 1 244 Biltmore Avenue, Dormont, Pa. 

Cole, Marjorie 2303 Sunset Avenue, Wanamassa, N.J. 

Collier, Charlotte Church Street, Smithfield, Pa. 

Cooperrider, Nancy 1401 Highland Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Davis, David 213 South Wayne Street, St. Marys, Ohio 

Deer, Elva Mae 717 Sherwood Avenue, Pittsburgh 4, Pa. 

Dewey, Dorothy 80 Amherstdale Road, Snyder, N.Y. 

Dickinson, Elizabeth 375 Riverside Drive, New York, N.Y. 

Duff, Nancy 1603 Union Street, McKeesport, Pa. 

Eaton, Jane 2106 Sunset Blvd., Steubenville, Ohio 

Elder, Diana 485 East Washington Street, New Castle, Pa. 

Engel, Samuel 120 Cove Road, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Ertle, Walter Avella Heights, Avella, Pa. 

Fairbanks, Beverly 88 Stockbridge Road, Yonkers 3, N.Y. 

Ferguson, Robert 392 Hazel Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Finney, Lois 147 Mason Drive, Glenshaw, Pa. 

Fleming, Ann Franklin Avenue, East Oakmont, Pa. 

Flood, Ruth Ann 436 West 38th Street, Ashtabula, Ohio 

Foedish, Elizabeth 2624 Geneese Street, Utica, N.Y. 

Fox, Rose Anne Twin Oaks, Llewellyn Park, West Orange, N.J. 

Galm, Edna 58 Elm Avenue, Floral Park, N.Y. 

Garner, Rose Eleanor Bethany, W.Va. 



Bethany College Bulletin 121 

Gillis, Elizabeth Foxon Road, East Haven 12, Conn. 

Gottlieb, Stuart. . 1678 Grand Avenue, New York 53, N.Y. 

Grove, Dorothy 3026 Broad Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 

Hager, Pauline Box 32, Fairbank, Pa. 

Hagman, Louise 435 East 66th Street, New York 21, N.Y. 

Haley, Joan 201 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn 5, N.Y. 

Halley, Vivian 239 86th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Hallock, Helen Akron Road, Medina, Ohio 

Haney, Jean 450 Riverside Drive, New York, N.Y. 

Harner, Anne 811 Vine Street ,Versailles Boro, McKeesport, Pa. 

Harrison, Esther North Street, North Branford, Conn. 

Henne, Margaret 311 22nd Street, N.W., Canton, Ohio 

Hilf, Dorothy 274 Beverly Road, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Hixson, Barbara 324 Orchard Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Hughes, Robert 42-26 82nd Street, Elmhurst, N.Y. 

Ilvento, Peter. . . 927 West Side Avenue, Jersey City, N.J. 

Jeffries, Virginia 221 Highlands Avenue, Ben Avon, Pa. 

Jones, Betty G 1608 Lee Avenue, McKeesport, Pa. 

Jordon, Jeanne 1296 Kensington Avenue, Buffalo 15, N.Y. 

Kane, Irene Apt. 3D, 762 Riverside Drive, New York 31, N.Y. 

Karavanic, Violet William Penn Highway, Weirton, W.Va. 

Keckley, Beryl Ann. 970 Mt. Vernon Road, Newark, Ohio 

Keller, Marjorie 2144 Marshall Avenue, Elm Grove, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Kenny, Nancy. 850 Country Club Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Koleszar, John 297 Avenue C, Bayonne, N.J. 

Koon, Eileen 1701 Morgantown Avenue, Fairmont, W.Va. 

Lee, Elizabeth Jane 49 Park Avenue, Bloomfield, N.J. 

Leonard, Ruth. ^ R.F.D. 1, Westfield, Mass. 

Linnard, Carloyn 618 Pierce Street, Maumee, Ohio 

Loeser, Eugene 237 Tacoma Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Long, Doris Jean Pine Grove, W.Va. 

Mahan, Lois 517 Washington Avenue, Charleroi, Pa. 

Marmoci, Norma 100 Lefferts Avenue, New York 25, N.Y. 

Martin, Mary Jo White Chapel Road, Newark, Ohio 

Maynard, Beverly 16190 Greenlawn Avenue, Detroit 21, Mich. 

Meissner, Marie 241 Academy Avenue, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Meyer, William 17 East 18th Street, New York 26, N.Y. 

Miller, Marghretta 2064 East 88th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 

Moody, Antoinette 43 Balmiere Parkway, Cranford, N.J. 

Morris, Dorothy 1247 Illinois Avenue, Dormont, Pa. 

Morris, Rheda Box 72, McClellandtown, Pa. 

McCabe, Joan 101 Bromleigh Road, Stewart Manor, N.Y. 

McFadden, Estella. Bethany, W.Va. 

Oliver, Agnes , Box 87, R.F.D. 1, East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Onasch, Shirley 33~i$ 80th Street, Jackson Heights, N.Y 

Ornold, Joyce 517 North Front Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Orthey, Eugenia 5218 Amboy Road, Staten Island 12, N.Y. 

Otto, Jean : 85-26 122nd Street, Richmond Hill, N.Y. 



122 Bethany College Bulletin 

Owen, Pauline 872 Wright Avenue, Schenectady, N.Y. 

Palmer, Kathryn 58 Dewey Avenue, Newark, Ohio 

Paxson, Maxine 1116 South Zane Highway, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Pease, Mary Lois 297 High Street, Wadsworth, Ohio 

Pernettas, Shirley 2325 24th Street, Sacramento, Cal. 

Peters, Ralph 66-67 Fresh Pond Road, Ridgewood, Long Island, N.Y. 

Pierson, Marilyn 897 East Broad Street, Westfield, N.J. 

Pinter, Gloria 31 Tenafly Road, Englewood, N.J. 

Pisciotta, Toinette 1466 77th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Poole, Margaret 48-11 Browvale Drive, Little Neck, N.Y. 

Radulovic, Mildred 3107 Auberle Street, McKeesport, Pa. 

Raymond, Doris 125 Victoria Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Renner, Robert R 1259 Oakridge Drive, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Reynolds, Marie 72 Baldwin Place, Bloomfield, N.J. 

Richey, Elizabeth Ann 75 Fairview Avenue, Port Washington, N.Y. 

Robinson, Betty Bethany, W.Va. 

Russell, Franklin 207 Linden Road, Mineola, N.Y. 

Russell, George 207 Linden Road, Mineola, N.Y. 

Russo, Frances 642 Esplanade, Pelham Manor, N.Y. 

Schlanger, Gladys 215 East Gun Hill Road, New York, N.Y. 

Sesler, Jeffrey Ann 308 Morgantown Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Smith, Jo Ann 626 West 44th Street, Ashtabula, Ohio 

Smith, Marilyn - Rudolph, Ohio 

Stanton, Eleanor Germonds Road, New City, N.Y. 

Steffy, Jane 532 Maple Avenue, Trenton, N.J. 

Stein, Josiah 156 Kruger Street, Elm Grove, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Strehan, Margaret 100 Palmer Place, Leonia, N.J. 

Stricklin, Alma Elizabeth Box 45, Triadelphia, Wheeling, W r .Va. 

Unsworth, Edith 3S~34 84th Street, Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

Wade, Elaine 7 Steele Avenue, Brownsville, Pa. 

Watson, Ann 67 Wilson Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Weser, Emma Lou R.F.D. 1 , Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Wheaton, Glenn 1705 Second Street, Moundsville, W.Va. 

White, Virginia 1010 Michigan Avenue, Maumee, Ohio 

Zaphyr, Peter 2408 Jacob Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Unclassified Students 

Fleming, Mrs. Eugenia L Bethany, W.Va. 

Jones, Evelyn Bethany, W.Va. 

Montoya, Graciela Plaza Bolognesi 558, Lima, Peru 

Redding, James A Bethany, W.Va. 

Sage, Alvin H., Jr Bethany, W.Va. 

Sarver, Hilda Bethany, W.Va. 

Sleszynska, Ceslas Bethany, W.Va. 

* Part-time students 



ROSTER OF NAVY V-12 STUDENTS 

1 944-1 945 

Agraphiotis, Arthur 316 Coltart Avenue, Pittsburgh 13, Pa. 

Aitken, Jack 402 Beechhurst Avenue, Morgantown, W.Va. 

Alderman, John 1059 Indiana Avenue, Fairmont, W.Va. 

Altemus, Braden 811 Vickroy Avenue, Johnstown, Pa. 

Andress, Frank 625 Crown Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Armstrong, Gorman 1020 Ross Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Arter, David Wellsville Road, Lisbon, Ohio 

Ashby, Donald 1811 Coventry Road, Columbus, Ohio 

Ayers, Richard 1910 North Madison Street, Arlington,Va. 

Bachman, John 178 Orchard Lane, Columbus, Ohio 

Bagosi, Joseph .' 304 Jefferson Avenue, Ellwood City, Pa. 

Baileys, Donald , R.F.D. 4, Elizabeth, W.Va. 

Bannon, Richard 47 McMunn Avenue, Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 

Barrington, Rodney 822 East Elm Street, Lima, Ohio 

Bassett, Harry 521 1 Keystone Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bauer, James Beechwood Blvd., Ellwood City, Pa. 

Beal, Chester 72 Evergreen Drive, Independence, Ohio 

Beathard, Maurice 172 Washington Avenue, London, Ohio 

Bell, Ross 29 Morrison Avenue, Morgantown, W.Va. 

Bennett, John Mather, Pa. 

Beyersdorfer, John 3418 Bishop Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Birchard, Raymond R.F.D. 3, Cambridge Springs, Pa. 

Bisceglia, Charles 10 Connoquenessing Terrace, Ellwood City, Pa. 

Bobofchak, Raymond 34 2 3 West 119 Street, Cleveland 11, Ohio 

Bolger, William 511 Maple Lane, Sewickley, Pa. 

Bollens, Alfred 232 N. Fairmount Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Booher, David Auburn, Kentucky 

Booth, Max Edon, Ohio 

Born, Donald R.F.D. 1, Reedsville, W.Va. 

Boulton, James 271 5 Merrimac Blvd., Toledo, Ohio 

Bowman, Robert 513 S. Sandusky Avenue, Upper Sandusky, Ohio 

Brattain, Edwin 5979 Monroe Street, Sylvania, Ohio 

Bredt, Jack 19291 Battersea Blvd., Rocky River, Ohio 

Brendle, Dorsey R.F.D. 7, Box 41 1, Johnstown, Pa. 

Brown, David 2107 Calumet Street, Toledo, Ohio 

Brown, Edward R.F.D. 1, Box 715, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Brown, Kenneth 241 E. Blake Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 

Brown, Richard 1706 Virginia Street, E., Charleston 1, W.Va. 

Brown, Robert Box 202, Romney, W.Va. 

Brown, Warren R.F.D. 4, Pottstown, Pa. 

Buck, Donald * 40 Lounez Avenue, Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Buck, Rudolph 3002 Walnut Street, McKeesport, Pa. 

Burford, Cecil R.F.D. 1, Poca, W.Va. 

Butler, Robert 1217 Collis Street, Charleston, W.Va. 



124 Bethany College Bulletin 

Callahan, James 93 Williamson Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Campbell, Frederick 129 Fourth Street, McDonald, Pa. 

Campbell, Thomas 46 Highland Avenue, Shadyside, Ohio 

Carnahan, Robert 301 South Huron Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Carney, James Wallace 103 1 Leishman Avenue, New Kensington, Pa. 

Carr, Lloyd R.F.D. 1, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Catania, Alexander 171 Thomas Street, Monongah, W.Va. 

Catlett, John 36% David Street, Keyser, W.Va. 

Caudle, Ralph Box 1 14, Anawalt, W.Va. 

Caver, John Box 1200, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Chetlin, Norman 532 Grandview Avenue, East Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Chiaverini, Giovanni 620 Ohio Avenue, Midland, Pa. 

Cicerchi, Robert 3271 W. 32nd Street, Cleveland, Ohio 

Claggett, Donald 27 Lonsdale Avenue, Dayton, Ohio 

Clark, Dwane 225 Locust Street, Meadville, Pa. 

Clark, James 19 Oakmont Road, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Clark, Walter 222 Plumer Avenue, Emsworth, Pa. 

Clawson, Frederic R.F.D. 2, Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Clemens, James 124 Vincennes Avenue, Oakdale, Pa. 

Clowes, George Brant Road, Ingomar, Pa. 

Cochrane, Frank 1921 Massey Circle, South Charleston, W.Va. 

Cohen, Morris 201 1 — B 38th Street, S.E., Washington, D.C. 

Coleman, Paul 26 Raymond Avenue, Shelby, Ohio 

Craumer, Jean 534 Vineland Road, Bay Village, Ohio 

Crockett, Peter 219 Second Street, California, Pa. 

Crosset, Richard 35°7 Principio Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Damrau, Edward 1227 Milton Avenue, Swissvale, Pa. 

Dasovich, Daniel Amherstdale, W.Va. 

Davis, Charles 4720 Applegate Road, Youngstown, Ohio 

Davis, Elmer 705 W. Third Street, Delphos, Ohio 

Davis, Leland .Jackson Center, Ohio 

Davis, Walter 222 Worth Street, Johnstown, Pa. 

Day, Malcolm 123 61st Street, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Deem, Howard Slate, W.Va. 

Deringer, John 417 West Ninth Avenue, Tarentum, Pa. 

Dooley, Daniel. 311 Main Street, Sharonville, Ohio 

Doolittle, Robert R.F.D. 2, Reedy, W.Va. 

Dorencamp, Donald 518 Maple Street, East Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dorocak, Donald 4416 Sackett Avenue, Cleveland Ohio 

Dorsett, Charles Minden, W.Va. 

Dorsey, Daniel 3 Hobart Street, Welch, W.Va. 

Dorsey, William R 6243 Monitor Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Drayer, William 427 E. Montgomery Street, Miamisburg, Ohio 

Dreesen, William 7012 Hamilton Avenue, Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 

Dugan, Alfred 1 147 School Street, Indiana, Pa. 

Dunlap , Raymond 3503 Rose Avenue, Wesleyville, Pa. 

Early, Anderson Highland Avenue, Mullens, W.Va. 

Echols, Archie David 122 Arnold Avenue, Lancaster, Ohio 



Bethany College Bulletin 125 

Eichar, Donald Wiltshire, Ohio 

Eicher, David. 1077 Church Street, Indiana, Pa. 

Eppley, Donald 113 Homstead Avenue, Johnstown, Pa. 

Ertell, Kenneth 90 Oviatt Street, Hudson, Ohio 

Eskey, Chester 2241 Chapline Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Evans, John 3826 Earlscourt, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Evers, Anders 509 Reid Street, Palatka, Florida 

Fabek, Thomas 2817 Mary Street, Youngstown, Ohio 

Failinger, Walter 826 N. Main Street, Washington, Pa. 

Favero, Valentine Route 2, Box 61, New Kensington, Pa. 

Figuly, Robert 1612 Huron Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Fisher, Robert 422 New York Avenue, Rochester, Pa. 

Fithian, Rober t 3S°3 Glenwood Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Fogo, Joseph 215 N. Fourth Street, Indiana, Pa. 

Frasure, Richard 337 North Street, Logan, Ohio 

Freas, Donald Verner. 349 Oakland Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Frey, Frederick 1913 Mt. Vernon Avenue, Point Pleasant, W.Va. 

Friedman, Samuel 5402 Beacon Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Frondorf, Edwin 343 Erkenbrecher Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Geldbach, Donald 1304 Chamberlain Avenue, Fairmont, W.Va. 

Gibbs, Clarence 326 E. Street, N.E., Washington 2, D.C. 

Gibson, Harold 2010 Hayward Street, Columbia, S.C. 

Gilbert, Lee 1393 Mulford Road, Columbus, Ohio 

Glowacki, Zigmond 1140 Muldowney Avenue, Lincoln Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Goldstein, Arthur 499 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, N.Y. 

Gordon, Raymond 11 23 South Thomas Street, Barcroft, Apt. 2, Arlington, Va. 

Gore, Harry 417 Linden Avenue, Johnstown, Pa. 

Guist, Guyer 909 Ross Street, Tarentum, Pa. 

Hackney, James *. R.F.D. 1, Brownsville, Pa. 

Haddle, Gillian 1 57 D Street, Johnstown, Pa. 

Hall, LeRoy 866 Center Street, Versailles, Pa. 

Handlan, William 17 Laurel Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Harlan, David 208 Edgewood Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Harmon, Raymond 73 Reynolds Street, Charleston, W.Va. 

Hartley, Richard 1438 Hildreth Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Hartmeyer, George 907 Franklin Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Hawkins, George 848 Fifth Avenue, Coraopolis, Pa, 

Helm, Cyrus 209 Queen Street, Kittanning, Pa. 

Henry, Leo 926 Jancey Street, Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

Himelick, Robert 3546 St. Albans Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Hofer, Rudolph 390 Jayson Avenue, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Hoffman, William 353 Walnut Street, Sharpsville, Pa. 

Holmes, Glenn Reedsville, W.Va. 

Hughes, Philip 32 Oregon Avenue, Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 

Hurst, Nelson 3220I Far Hills Avenue, Dayton, Ohio 

Jahnke, William 2932 Glenmawr Avenue, Sheraden, Pittsburgh 4, Pa. 

James, John 36 Rebecca Street, Shinnston, W.Va. 

Jeffrey, Ora Jeffrey, W.Va. 



126 Bethany College Bulletin 

Jenkins, John 328 Beaver Street, Zelienople, Pa. 

Jergel, Alvin 5412 Camelia Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Johnson, Warren 1 140 Second Street, Beaver, Pa. 

Johnston, Robert 516 N. Spring Street, Logan, Ohio 

Jones, Richard 416 Hawkins Avenue, N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Joyce, John 5628 Bryant Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Kelemen, Emery Box 13, Que Creek, Pa. 

Kennelty, Harry R.F.D. 2, Oakford Hts., Jeannette, Pa. 

Kirkpatrick, William 328 East Pearl Street, Butler, Pa. 

Kissinger, Donald 2396 Almont Street, Pittsburgh 10, Pa. 

Kloss, Lester 144 Strawbridge Avenue, Sharon, Pa. 

Knezevich, Anthony 613 Hemlock Way, Glassport, Pa. 

Knight, Henry Wilsonburg, W.Va. 

Kobaly. Michael R.F.D. 1, Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Korby, Andrew R.F.D. 2, Lowellville, Ohio 

Kozokoff, Norman 1 23 Upland Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Krumpack, Rudolph 158 West 18th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Latkin, Jack 6342 Douglas Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Latorre, Joseph 229 W. Saylor Street, Atlas, Pa. 

Lavrinc, George 2684 Woodstock Avenue, Swissvale, Pa. 

Lehman, Alfred 3 North Colonial Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

Leifeld, John 1805 Baldridge Road, Columbus, Ohio 

Lephard, James 309 W. South Street, Arcanum, Ohio 

Lescoe, Richard 20 Plough Street, N.S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Lewis, William 340 Craft Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Link, Robert 60 Hillcrest Lane, Uniontown, Pa. 

Lohr, Maurice Paden City, W.Va. 

Loufman, John Deimling Road, Perrysville, Pa. 

Lough, Otis R.F.D. 1, Captina, W.Va. 

Loveless, David R.F.D. 2, West Farmington, Ohio 

Lucas, William 1581 Elizabeth Place, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Madden, Frank 105 Jacksonia Street, N.S., Pittsburgh 12, Pa. 

Magoto, Robert R.F.D. 1, Versailles, Ohio 

Mahoney, Joseph 4625 Mahoning Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Marsh, Walter 60 Olive Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Marshall, Thomas 751 Snyder Street, Morgantown, W.Va. 

Martin, Wandyl 1208 Red Oak Street, Charlestown, W.Va. 

Matto, Elmer Box 517, Star Junction, Pa. 

Mehalick, John 3401 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mellin, Gilbert 107 Washington Avenue, Oakmont, Pa. 

Meyer, Kenneth 1512 Brown Street, Dayton, Ohio 

Miller, Emmett 4538 Manchester Road, R.F.D. 10, Akron, Ohio 

Miller, William 6825 Meade Street, Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 

Miner, Wilbert 1414 Eighth Street, Moundsville, W.Va. 

Mitchell, John 227 S. Second Street, Clearfield, Pa. 

Mocha, Joseph 234 S. Third Street, St. Clair, Pa. 

Molinaro, John 7655 Baxter Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Monteleone, James R.F.D. 1, Box 47, Wheeling, W.Va. 



Bethany College Bulletin 127 

Moore, Ruskin Hollansburg, Ohio 

Moore, William R R.F.D. i, Lowellville, Ohio 

Morris, Romie Box 233) Fort Hill, Charleston, W.Va. 

Mundell, James '. 1616 Rhode Island Avenue, Washington, D.C. 

Murphy, James ' 1 33 5 Chadsey Drive, Euclid 17, Ohio 

Muryn, Stephen 408 Delaware Street, Monessen, Pa. 

McCaul, James 41 1 8 Main Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McClain, Lloyd Rainelle, W.Va. 

McMahon, Walter. 342 Henry Street, Crestline, Ohio 

Nicely, Louis , Star Route E, Ligonier, Pa. 

Nicklas, Robert 205 Bon Air Avenue, Pittsburgh 10. Pa. 

Oatney, Richard . . . . R.F.D. 1, Pleasantville, Ohio 

Ondrechen, John 2234 Main Street, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Orr, William Weldon Plan, McKeesport, Pa. 

Owen, Donald 872 Wright Avenue, Schenectady, N.Y. 

Pandak, William 249 13th Street, Conway, Pa. 

Parrett, Olin 240 E. State Street, Athens, Ohio 

Parsons, Jack 127 Gambel Avenue, Elm Grove, W.Va. 

Patterson, David 4503 Washington Blvd., Wilmington, Del. 

Payne, Kenneth 517 Nancy Street, Charleston, W.Va. 

Peat, James 383 Corrine Street, Johnstown, Pa. 

Perryman, Clifton 3657 Stoer Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Peters, Raymond Linn Road, Brownsville, Pa. 

Peters, Robert 704 N. Second Street, Apollo, Pa. 

Phillips, Guy Donald 6 Wyoming Street, Pittsburgh 11, Pa. 

Plazak, Cyril. 1136 Eighth Avenue, Brackenridge, Pa. 

Plough, Arlo 528 Franklin Avenue, Vandergrift, Pa. 

Pond, William 402 N. Sheppard Street, Richmond, Va. 

Poulson, George R.F.D. 1, Thornville, Ohio 

Pratt, James 526 Villa Drive, Corpus Christi, Texas 

Prestier, Rudolph 115 Earl Place, S.E., Canton, Ohio 

Price, Robert Fairview Drive, Fort Hill, Charleston, W.Va. 

Pritchard, William 373 Park Lane Drive, Galesburg, 111. 

Rader, Homer 1503 14th Avenue, Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Randolph, Morris 668 Madison Avenue, Meadville,. Pa 

Reardon, James R.F.D. 2, Brunswick, Ohio 

Reed, Andrew Joe Glenville, W.Va. 

Reiling, Gebhart 442 S. Dallas Avenue, Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 

Resler, Edwin 33 Wellington Drive, West View, Pa. 

Riedel, Robert 3541 Eoff Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Rinetti, Edward 41-02103 Street, Corona, New York, N.Y. 

Roberts, James R.F.D. 3, Washington, Pa. 

Roberts, John 171 1 Rail Road Avenue, Charleston, W.Va. 

Robinson, Sydney Walton, W.Va. 

Robinson, William 232 Tremont Avenue, Greensburg, Pa. 

Ross, Raymond 4 Liberty Street, Oil City, Pa. 

Ruckman, John West Liberty, W.Va. 

Rumbaugh, Robert 35 W. Campbell Street, Blairsville, Pa. 



128 Bethany College Bulletin 

Rutherford, Frank 234 Tazewell Park, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Salata, Thomas 910 Wabash Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Samuels, William 202 Fairmont Avenue, New Castle Pa. 

Sanders, Morris 561 Second Street, Pitcairn, Pa. 

Sanker, Allan 3716 Beatrice Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Schaffer, Donald 319 West 40th Street, Shadyside, Ohio 

Scheel, George 1 52 N. Oak, London, Ohio 

Schoener, Walter 44 Estella Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Schrecengost, John 655 Shad Drive E., Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Schreiber, Richard 314 Velsack Road, Glenshaw, Pa. 

Schroth, William 102 Kittanning Pike, Pittsburgh 15, Pa. 

Schubert, Richard 709 Welty Street, Greensburg, Pa. 

Selekman, Milton 5810 Bryant Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Selvig, Walter 2343 Birtley Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Shepard, John First Avenue, Valencia, Pa. 

Short, Leo 3103 Ashlyn Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Silber, William R.F.D. 5, Wheeling, W.Va 

Siman, Matthew 2625 Hunter Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Sisler, Burhl Randonville, Terra Alta, W.Va. 

Slovik, Florian R.F.D. 3, Box 42, McDonald, Pa. 

Smith, Homer Alma, W.Va. 

Smith, Ralph Bond New Vienna, Ohio 

Smith, William 914 Viand Street, Point Pleasant, W.Va. 

Spauling, Carl West Liberty, W.Va. 

Spurlock, Eldon R.F.D. 1, B arbours ville, W.Va. 

Stansbery, David 716 Marseilles Avenue, Upper Sandusky, Ohio 

Stengel, Charles 943 Norwich Avenue, Pittsburgh 26, Pa. 

Stephens, Robert Comfort, W.Va. 

Stephens, William 1440 Cornell Avenue, Berkeley, Calif. 

Stewart, Charles M R.F.D. 1, Mineral Wells, W.Va. 

Stewart, Charles W 266 First Street West, Ceredo, W.Va. 

Stewart, James 2635 Highland Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Stitt, Leonard 1246 Denisonview Street, Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 

Stultz, Robert 109 Elmhurst Street, Morgantown, W.Va. 

Sudac, David 2302 Manor Avenue, Swissvale, Pa. 

Swain, J. Robert 1605 Laurel Avenue, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Tachovsky, Hilary . 508 Eighth Avenue, New Brighton, Pa. 

Terry, Charles 508 Old York Road, Abington, Pa. 

Thompson, David 3645 Perrysville Avenue, Pittsburgh 14, Pa. 

Thompson Kenneth 1250 River Road, Beaver, Pa. 

Thwaite, Edwin 191 5 Warwood Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Toprani, Carl 424 Fourth Street, Donora, Pa. 

Trabits, James Railwood Avenue, Avonmore, Pa. 

Trefzger, Herbert 3444 Cheviot Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Trent, Willis Gilbert, W.Va. 

Truslow, Thomas Fifth Avenue, Box 483, Montgomery, W.Va. 

Turner, Talmadge Santa Anna, Texas 

Van Camp, Charles 3349 Franklin Street, Bellaire, Ohio 



Bethany College Bulletin 129 

Vande Linde, Otto Box 177, Danville, W.Va. 

Van Tol, John Mildred Street, Charles Town, W.Va. 

Varrati, Anthony 503 Summit Avenue, Ellwood City, Pa. 

Vickers, George 314 Sixth Avenue, Montgomery, W.Va. 

Vido, Bernard 3823 W. 143 Street, Cleveland, Ohio 

Von Bargen, Glenn 1424 Jefferson Avenue, Reading, Ohio 

Walters, John 254 N. Craig Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ward, Kent 127 Winston Road, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Wasko, Andrew Box 413, Fredericktown, Pa. 

Watkins, Robert 5617 Elgin Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Watts, Ronald Seth, W.Va. 

Wenzel, Donald 839 Brighton Avenue, Toledo 9, Ohio 

Weston, David 64 Park Avenue, Bloomfield, N.J. 

Wharton, Lewis 1428 — 30th Street, Parkersburg, W.Va. 

Whi taker, Robert 2068 Malowe Avenue, Lakewood, Ohio 

White, Robert 206 Main Street, Reynoldsville, Pa. 

Wick, Earl 1 195 Arch Street, Washington, Pa. 

Williams, James R 2862 Castlegate Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wilson, Joseph 1 10419 Forbes Road, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Witt, Cornelius 200 Garfield Avenue, Long Branch, N.J. 

Witwicki, Raymond . 521 Hulton Street, Carnegie, Pa. 

Wojcik, George 305 Bow Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Wolfe, Joseph 519 East Winter Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Wolschlag, Richard 2004 Guadalupe Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Young, Philip 721 Baldwin Street, Meadville, Pa. 

Young, Wayne South Main Street, Columbiana, Ohio 

Yount, Marlin R.F.D. 4, Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Zilka, John Box 229, Bentley ville, Pa. 

Zimmer, Lionel 124 Hancock Avenue, Hamilton, Ohio 

Navy V-12 students are not classified until they make application for degree. 



Summary of Students 1 944-1 945 

Summer Semester 1944 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 5 21 26 

Juniors 5 $6 41 

Sophomores 7 39 46 

Freshmen 19 28 47 

Unclassified (Special Students) 1 4 5 

Total 37 128 165 

Navy V-12 Students 313 

Total Enrollment 478 



130 Bethany College Bulletin 

Winter Semester 1 944-1 945 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 2 16 28 

Juniors 8 40 48 

Sophomores 8 38 56 

Freshmen 18 99 117 

Unclassified (Special Students) 2 3 5 

Total 38 206 244 

Navy V-12 Students 212 

Total Enrollment 456 

Spring Semester 1945 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 5 32 37 

Juniors 5 33 38 

Sophomores 17 37 54 

Freshmen 9 90 99 

Unclassified (Special Students) o 1 1 

(Postgraduate) o 2 1 

Total 36 195 231 

Navy V-i 2 Students 147 

Total Enrollment 378 

For the College Year 1 944-1945 

Men Women Total 

Seniors 10 58 68 

Juniors 7 38 45 

Sophomores 19 52 71 

Freshmen 18 108 126 

Unclassified (Special Students) .2 5 7 

Total 56 261 317 

Navy V-12 Students 313 

Total Enrollment 630 

The enrollment figures for the college year do not agree with those for each semester 
because of the reclassification of students. 



Bethany College Bulletin 131 

Enrollment by States and Foreign Countries 

1 944-1 945 

Civilian Students 

Arkansas i 

California I 

Connecticut 4 

District of Columbia 1 

Massachusetts 3 

Michigan 4 

New Jersey 11 

New York 80 

Ohio 50 

Pennsylvania 87 

Peru 1 

West Virginia 62 

Total 317 

Navy V-12 Students 

California 1 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 4 

Florida 1 

Illinois 1 

Kentucky 1 

New Jersey 2 

New York 4 

Ohio 78 

Pennsylvania 142 

South Carolina 1 

Tennessee 1 

Texas 1 

Virginia 3 

West Virginia 70 

Total. . ■ 313 



132 Bethany College Bulletin 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF BETHANY COLLEGE 

The Alumni Association of Bethany College had its origin in 1846, six years after the* 
founding of the college, when the members of the first three graduating classes met during 
the commencement season and organized the "Society of the Alumni of Bethany College." 
The constitution, drawn up and adopted at that time, remains as one of the interesting 
historical documents of the college. In later years there was no continuous and active 
alumni program. 

Alumni records and activities are now under the direction of Mr. George C. Hettler, who 
is the Executive Secretary. In the determination of policies and program the leadership is 
taken by the Alumni Advisory Council of Bethany College. This council is composed of the 
officers of the alumni association and representatives from the geographical districts. The 
alumni office at the college preserves records concerning the activities of alumni, publishes 
throughout the year several alumni issues of the Bethany College Bulletin, assists in the pro- 
grams of branch associations, and seeks, in various ways to promote alumni activity and 
interest. All graduates and former students automatically become members of the associa- 
tion when they leave the campus. The association is affiliated with the American Council. 

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

President R. D. Hurl, Shelby, Ohio 

Vice President Francis J. Love, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Secretary George C. Hettler, Bethany, W.Va. 

President of the Alumni Advisory Council R. D. Hurl, Shelby, Ohio 



INDEX 



Attention is called to the special announcement on the inside of the front cover 



Page 

Academic Information 105 

Academic Recognition 3 

Accounts, Payment of 27 

Activities, Student 103 

Administration, Officers 7 

Administration Staff 13 

Admissions and Induction 17 

Advanced Standing 18 

Advanced Standing by Achievement 

Tests 19 

Freshman Admission 17 

General Requirements 17 

Method of Enrollment 21 

Orientation Program and Registra- 
tion 20 

Placement Tests for Freshmen 20 

Pre-College Guidance 20 

Reservation of Dormitory Rooms. . . 21 

Special Students 19 

Advanced Standing 18 

Advanced Enrollment . 109 

Alumni Association 132 

Art Application 97 

Bequests, Forms for 136 

Bible 90 

Biology 79 

Board . . . . 24 

Board of Trustees 5 

Buildings and Grounds 98 

Business Administration 68 

Calendar, College 4 

Chemistry 82 

Classification of Students 105 

Comprehensive Examination 40 

Concerts 102 

Contents, Table of 2 

Convocation 102 

Degrees 

Conferred October 1944 114 

Conferred February 1945 115 

Requirements for 34 



Page 

Departments of Instruction 45 

Art Appreciation 97 

Bible 90 

Biology 79 

Business Administration 68 

Chemistry 82 

Church History 92 

Economics 68 

Education 58 

English 50 

French 55 

Geography 84 

Geology 84 

German $6 

Greek 48 

History, American 71 

History, European 71 

History, Naval 73 

Homiletics 92 

Journalism 54 

Latin 49 

Library Science 73 

Mathematics 85 

Music 94 

Naval Organization 47 

Orientation 47 

Personnel Administration 60 

Philosophy 93 

Physical Education 62 

Physics 87 

Political Science 72 

Psychology 61 

Secretarial Training 74 

Social Science 68 

Sociology 76 

Spanish 57 

Speech and Dramatics S3 

Dramatics 54 

Economics 68 

Education 58 

Educational Program 39 

Comprehensive Examination 40 

Instruction 39 



Page 

Lower Division 39 

Student Guidance 40 

Upper Division 40 

English 50 

Enrollment 

Method of 21 

Summary of 129 

Equipment and Resources 98 

Buildings and Grounds 98 

Instructional Equipment 100 

Libraries 100 

Location 98 

Examinations 

Comprehensive 40 

Special 108 

Expenses 22 

Board 24 

Breakage and Guarantee Deposits. . . 26 

Fees 22 

Payment of Accounts 27 

Room Rent 23 

Summer Term 26 

Tuition 22 

Faculty of Instruction 8 

Functional Committees of 14 

Fees 22 

Financial Aids 32 

Fraternities 104 

French 55 

Freshman Days 20 

General Information 102 

Academic Information 105 

Lectures and Concerts 102 

Music and Dramatics 104 

Religious Life 102 

Social Regulations in 

Special Days 102 

Student Activities 103 

Student Health 109 

Geography 84 

Geology 84 

German : . . 56 

Grading System 105 

Graduation and Honors 34 

Degree Requirements 34 

Honors 36 



Page 
Greek 48 

History 7° 

History and Purpose 15 

Homiletics 9 2 

Honors 34 

Instructional Equipment 100 

Instruction, Departments of 45 

Journalism 54 

Laboratories 100 

Latin 49 

Lectures and Concerts 102 

Libraries 100 

Library Science 73 

Library Staff 12 

Location 98 

Lower Division Courses 39 

Mathematics 85 

Music 94 

Music and Dramatics 104 

Navy Staff 12 

Occupational Preparation 42 

Business Administration 43 

Business Training for Women 43 

Christian Ministry 43 

Dentistry 43 

Education — Training of Teachers ... 43 

Engineering 43 

Graduate Study 44 

Guidance and Counselling 43 

Journalism 43 

Law 43 

Librarianship 43 

Medical Technology 43 

Medicine 43 

Navy V-12 16 

Nursing 43 

Personnel Administration 43 

Physical Education and Recreation. . 43 

Professional Chemistry 43 

Public School Music 43 

Public Service 43 



Page 

Secretarial Training 43 

Social Work 43 

Special Programs 42 

Officers of Administration 7 

Orientation 47 

Payment of Accounts 27 

Philosophy 93 

Physical Education 63 

Physics 87 

Placement 33 

Political Science 72 

Pre-College Guidance 20 

Probation 106 

Provisional Enrollment 107 

Psychology 61 

Purpose and History 15 

Registration, Orientation Program and . 20 

Religious Life 102 

Requirements 

For Admission 17 

For Degrees 34 

Residence Halls 23 

Residents of College Dormitories 13 

Room Rent 23 

Room Reservations 21 

Roster of Students 116 

Scholarships and Financial Aids 28 

Financial Aids 32 



Page 

Freshman Scholarships 28 

Scholarships for Upperclassmen 29 

Secretarial Training 74 

Social Regulations in 

Social Science 68 

Sociology 76 

Spanish 57 

Special Days 102 

Special Examinations 108 

Special Fees 25 

Special Students 19 

Speech and Dramatics S3 

Student Activities 103 

Student Guidance 40 

Student Health 109 

Student Roster 116 

Summary of Students 129 

Summer Term 4, 26 

Transcripts 109 

Trustees, Board of 5 

Committees 6 

Officers 6 

Tuition 22 

Upper Division Courses 40 

Veterans, Admission 19 

Withdrawal 108 



BEQUESTS 

Gifts to the college may take the form of lectureships, of scholarships, of professorships, 
of additions to the material equipment, or of contributions to the permanent endowment 
fund or the current expense fund of the college. Special conditions may, of course, be 
attached to any gift. Forms of bequests are suggested as follows: 

A. UNRESTRICTED BEQUEST 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation 
established by law at Bethany in the Commonwealth of West Virginia, the sum of 

dollars, to be applied to the general uses and purposes of the said 

institution. 

B. UNRESTRICTED BEQUEST MAKING THE COLLEGE 
RESIDUARY LEGATEE 

All the rest, residue, and remainder of my estate, real and personal, I devise and bequeath 
to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation established by law at Bethany inthe 
Commonwealth of West Virginia, to be applied to the general uses and purposes of the 
said institution. 

C. BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation 
established by law at Bethany in the Commonwealth of West Virginia, the sum of 

dollars to be invested and preserved inviolably for the endowment of 

Bethany College. 



IIP" 






etkai^u K^&lleae 



hi 
West Virginia 

"Our purpose To 

provide higher education 
in an atmosphere sympa- 
thetic to Christian ideals 
and Christian faith and 
to conserve and develop 
the moral character and 
religious life of its stu- 
dents:' 



PRESIDENT WILBUR H. CRAMBLET 



B 



•ETHANY COLLEGE WAS founded in 1840 by Alexander Campbeli 
and chartered by the State of Virginia. It is a small co-educational 
college of the liberal arts and sciences, privately controlled by a self 
perpetuating board of trustees. The college is accredited by all regional 
and national agencies. 




- 



DEAN OF THE 

FACULTY 
B. R. WEIMER 




OGLEBAY GATES 



From the beginning of his college 
career each student has an individual 
faculty counselor who is concerned 
with his total adjustment and develop- 
ment. The counselor and student have 
the help of specialists on the college 
staff whose services are always avail- 
able. When the student selects his 
major field of study, a member of the 
staff in that department, usually the 
department head, is appointed as the 
student's counselor to direct his 
academic program. A modern and 
adequate program of educational and 
aptitude testing is provided. 

DEAN OF STUDENTS 
F. H. KIRKPATRICK 





COMMENCEMEN 



HALL AND MAIN BUILDING 



Commencement Hall, the Main Building, and Oglebay Hall stand s 
together as one unit but ore separate in construction. All ore of Col- 
legiate Gothic architecture. Commencement Hall houses the auditor- 
ium and the Department of Music. The Main Building contains class- 
rooms, seminar rooms, and laboratories for physics and psychology. 




AN EXPERIMENT 
WITH ELECTRONICS 
EQUIPMENT 




OGLEBAY HALL 



The laboratories and lecture rooms for chemistry and biology are 
located in Oglebay Hall. 

The general apparatus in science reflects the completeness of the 
facilities available throughout the college. One faculty member to 12 
students makes possible individualization in instructional methods and 
program. 



A CLASS 

IN CLINICAL 

METHODS 





BACTERIOLOGY 




ORGANIC 
CH EM I S 




CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



* The library con- 
pins more than 
1,000 bound vol- 
m e s , numerous 
brrent periodicals, 
eve ra I special 
pllections. In 
i:aching procedure, 
pany courses are 
brary centered. 



REFERENCE 
DESK 





PHILLIPS HALL FOR WOMEN 



Phillips Hall is now occupied 
by the Navy V-12 Unit. It will 
be available for women after 
November 1, 1945. 





COCHRAN HALL F 
FACILITIES FO 



music for church 
ege functions. 




v^ PHILLIPS HALL 




S^e***' 




PHILLIPS HALL FOR WOMEN 



Phillips Hall is now occupied 
by the Navy V-12 Unit. It will 
be available for women after 
November 1 , 1 945. 





COLONIAL HOUSE 



DRAWI NG 




COCHRAN HALL PROVIDES ROOMING 
FACILITIES FOR FRESHMEN MEN 




There are four national so- 
rorities for women and five 
national fraternities for men. 




A PHILLIPS HALL 



SIGMA NU HOUSE 




GATEWAY HALL FOR WOMEN 



The men's fraternity houses are being operated temporarily by the 
college as residence halls for women. 



BETHANY HOUSE— STUDENT CENTER AND DINING HALL 






& 



iethany College founded by 
Alexander Campbell is the 
Idest college of the Disciples 
f Christ. A strong program 
i ministerial training is includ- 
d in the offerings of the 
ollege. 




THE BETHANY MEMORIAL CHURCH 




THE CHOIR ON 

THE CORRIDOR 

The college choir provides music for church 
services as well as for college functions. 



Campus and recreational areas of the col- 
lege comprise more than 60 acres. 



ACROSS 

TH E CAMPUS 





EXPERIMENTAL 
PSYCHOLOGY 



A SEMINAR 

IN ENGLISH 

L ITER ATU RE 




BETHESPIANS PRESENT "THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER" 






. % 






Except for official Navy j 
functions, the college 
band is open to all men 
2nd women students 



THE NAVY 

BAN D 





THE 

CAPTAIN'S 
REVIEW 



A CLASS IN SPEECH 





>1^JR. 



THE 



ISON IN ACTION ON RINE FIELD 



A 



COMPREHENSIVE sports program provides every student with 
an opportunity to participate in some form of athletic recreation. Rine 
Fields and the Irvin Gymnasium offer a varied program throughout 
the year. Swimming, football, tennis, cross-country, basketball, hockey, 
boxing, archery, volleyball, socker, handball, track, and baseball are 
among the sports available at Bethany. The all-weather court and miles 
of wooded nature trails are further centers of recreation. 





FIVE FIRSTS IN CROSS-COUNT 




A COMPLETE PROGRAM OF SPORTS FOR ALL 



E I R V I N 
G YMN AS I UM 




THE VI CTOR Y MARCH 



Preliminary Application for Freshman Class 

To secure priority in registration I hereby make application for admission to Bethany 
College for (month) , . , (year) . , 

I understand that actual acceptance to Bethany College depends upon my graduation 
from an accredited high school or preparatory school and upon my class rank being in 
the upper half. 

As soon as possible I shall fill out and file the complete application for admission. With 
this blank I am sending the required admission fee of $10.00. 

The application fee of $10.00 is refundable if the applicant is not accepted by the college. 
If the applicant is accepted, and then cancels his application ninety days prior to the open- 
ing of the semester in which he wishes to register and so notifies the Director of Admissions, 
$7.00 of the application fee will be refunded. If cancellation occurs after the above specified 
period, no part of the application fee will be refunded. 

(Signed) 

(Address) , 



Church membership or preference 

Nationality Race , 

Age Condition of health 

Preparatory or high school attended 

Date of graduation 

Headmaster or principal 

Address of school 



Occupational interest, 



Date. 



Send this blank to: 

Director of Admissions 
Bethany College 
Bethany, W.Va. 






BETHANY COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 
1946-1947 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA 
March I 946 



' 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Vol. XXXIX March, 1946 ' No. 3 

Entered as second class matter at Bethany Post Office, Bethany, W. Va. 

Published every month except July and August by Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. 



C ATA L O G U E 

i 9 4 6 - i 9 4 7 



CURRICULAR ANNOUNCEMENTS 

for 
i 946-1 947 



CHARTERED IN 1840 BY THE STATE OF VIRGINIA 



ACADEMIC RECOGNITION 

Bethany College is on the approved list of colleges of 
the Association of American Universities and is accredited 
by thq North Central Association of Colleges and Second- 
ary Schools as a degree granting institution. 

Bethany College is a member in good standing of the 
Association of American Colleges and the American Coun- 
cil on Education. 

Bethany College is recognized by various state depart- 
ments of education as an institution for the training of 
teachers. Women graduates of Bethany College are eligible 
to membership in the American Association of University 
Women. 



PART I 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ADMINISTRATION 
FACULTY 
COMMITTEES 



1946 



SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 


8 


9 


10 


II 


12 


13 


i+ 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


IS 


x6 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


IS 


ib 


17 


18 


19 


10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


IS 


16 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


20 


27 


28 


29 


30 




















DECEMBER 






















S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


S 


6 


7 


















8 


9 


10 


II 


12 


13 


14 






























IS 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 






























22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






























29 


30 


3i 

























1947 







JANUARY 










MAY 










SEPTEMBER 




s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 








1 


2 


^ 


4 






1 


2 


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CALENDAR 

1946 

Fall Semester 

September 13 and 14, Friday and Saturday — Faculty Seminar. 

September 15 to 18, Sunday to Wednesday — Evaluation and Registration for first semester 

entrants — "Freshman Week." 
September 1 8, Wednesday — Registration for fall semester. 
September 19, Thursday — 8:00 a.m., Classes begin. 
November 16, Saturday — Mid-semester grades are issued. 
November 21, Thursday — Thanksgiving, A college holiday. 
December 21, Saturday — 12:00 a.m., Christmas recess begins. 

1947 

January 3, Friday — 8:00 a.m., Christmas recess ends. 

January 21 to 24, Tuesday to Friday — Final Examinations for first semester. 

Spring Semester 

January 30 to February 3, Thursday to Monday — Evaluation and Registration for second 

semester entrants — "Freshman Week." 
February 3, Monday — Registration for spring semester. 
February 4, Tuesday — 8:00 a.m., Classes begin. 
March 29, Saturday — Mid-semester grades are issued. 
April 2, Wednesday — 5:00 p.m., Easter recess begins. 
April 8, Tuesday — 8:00 a.m., Easter recess ends. 
May 12, Monday — Reading Period begins for Seniors. 

May 26 to 30, Monday to Friday — Comprehensive Examinations for Seniors. 
June 2 to 6, Monday to Friday — Final Examinations for second semester. 
June 7, Saturday — Alumni Day. 
June 8, Sunday — Annual Commencement. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1948 

Thomas W. Phillips, Jr Butler, Pa. 

John M. Smith 1321 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

R. A. Balderson Farmers Nat'l. Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John Marshall Union Trust Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Robert D. Hurl Shelby Salesbook Company, Shelby, O. 

Daniel F. Mullane 202 Kenneth Avenue, Greensburg, Pa. 

Austin V. Wood Board of Trade Bldg., Wheeling, W. Va. 

Thomas E. Millsop Weirton Steel Company, Weirton, W. Va. 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1947 

*W. H. Fields 843 Main Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

W. S. Wilkin Wellsburg, W. Va. 

F. O. Carfer 50 Lincoln Blvd., Kenmore, N. Y. 

Dr. R. R. Renner 12900 Euclid Ave., E. Cleveland, O. 

H. O. Evans Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sidney C. Porter Box 765, East Liverpool, O. 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1946 

Judge Bennett Champ Clark. . . .United States Court of Appeals, Washington, D. C. 

J. C. Morris East Main Street, Shelby, O. 

Alfred E. Wright 101 Ben Lomond Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Dr. J. Parke McMullen Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Frank M. Hesse Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dr. Russell B. Bailey Wheeling Clinic, Wheeling, W. Va. 

George J. Barthold. . . .Miners & Mechanics Savings & Trust Co., Steubenville, O. 

John W. Love 340 Allison Avenue, Washington, Pa. 

Robert McKinney 17 DeHart Street, Morristown, N. J. 

* Deceased June 21, 1945 

Faculty Representative for 1946-1947: Professor Chandler Shaw 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

W. S. Wilkin, Chairman 

W. H. Cramblet, President and Treasurer 

N. W. Evans, Secretary 

COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Budget and Finance: 

Mr. Hesse, Chairman, Mr. Barthold, Mr. Hurl, Mr. Porter 

Executive: 

Mr. Wilkin, Chairman, Mr. Hurl, Vice-Chairman, Dr. Bailey, Mr. Barthold, Mr. 
Hesse, Dr. McMullen, Mr. Mullane, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Porter, Mr. Wright, Mr. Kirk- 
Patrick, Secretary 

Investment 

Mr. Mullane, Chairman, Mr. Cramblet, Mr. Hesse, Mr. McKinney 

Library: 

Mr. Evans, Chairman, Mr. Love, Dr. Renner, Mr. Wood 

Nominations: 

Mr. Marshall, Chairman, Mr. Morris, Dr. McMullen, Mr. Porter 

Student Welfare 

Dr. Bailey, Chairman, Mr. Millsop, Mr. Hurl 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet President of the College 

Bernal Robinson Weimer Dean of the Faculty 

Forrest Hunter Kirkpatrick. Dean of Students 

Florence Marian Hoagland Academic Adviser for Women 

Nbwton Wallace Evans Bursar 

John Gerald Patterson Director of Admissions and Alumni Secretary 



I 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION* 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet, President of the College on the M. M. Cochran Foundation 
and Professor of Mathematics. (Professor 1917; President 1934) 

A.B., Bethany College; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh. 



Jean Corrodi Moos, Professor-Emeritus of Music. (1 897-1934) 

College of Music, Zurich; Royal Conservatory of Music, Leipzig; A.M., Mus.D., 
Bethany College; Oberlin College; Columbia University. 

Henry Newton Miller, Professor-Emeritus of Bible School Pedagogy on the Herbert 
Moninger Foundation. (1 914-1 937) 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; D.D., Bethany College. 

Ebenezer Lee Perry, Professor-Emeritus of Latin. (1908-1939) 

A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; A.M., Columbia University; Litt.D., 
Bethany College. 



Pearl Mahaffey, Professor of Modern Languages. (1908) 

A.B., Miami University; University of California; A.M., Columbia University; Uni- 
versity of Grenoble; McGill University; University of Paris; Harvard University; 
National University of Mexico; Litt.D., Bethany College 

Andrew Leitch, Sarah B. Cochran Professor of Psychology. (1920) 

A.B., A.M., Butler College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; Columbia University; 

University of Chicago; University of Pennsylvania; Harvard University. 

William Kirk Woolery, Provost and George T. Oliver Professor of History and Political 
Science. (1921) 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., University of California; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

Bernal Robinson Weimer, Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Biology. (1921) 
A.B., A.M., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Irvin Taylor Green, Professor of New Testament and Church History. (1921) 

A.B., Transylvania College; A.M., B.D., Bethany College; University of Chicago. 



* The names are arranged in order of faculty rank and seniority of appointment. The 
date in parentheses indicates first appointment to this faculty. 
1 On sabbatical leave in second semester 1 945-1 946. 
Deceased May 20, 1946. 



Forrest Hunter Kirkpatrick, Dean of Students and Professor of Education. (1927) 

A.B., Bethany College; University of Dijon; A.M., Columbia University; University 
of Pittsburgh; University of London. 

1 Emmett Ephriam Roberts, Professor of English. (1928) 

A.B., Ohio University; A.M., Ohio State University; New York University. 

sOsborne Booth, T. W. Phillips Professor of Old Testament. (1929) 

A.B., Hiram College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. 

John J. Knight, Professor of Physical Education. (1930) 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College; University of Michigan; Ohio State University. 

John Stanley Valentine Allen, Professor of Physics. (1933) 
B.Eng., M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Florence Marian Hoagland, Academic Adviser for Women and Professor of English. 

(1936) 
A.B., Cornell University; A.M., Columbia University; University of Wisconsin, Ph.D., 
Cornell University; University of Cambridge. 

Reuben Hamilton Eliassen, Professor of Education. (1936) 

A.B., St. Olaf College; University of Minnesota; A.M., Columbia University; Stanford 
University; University of Chicago; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Dwight Eshelman Stevenson, Professor of Religion and Philosophy. (1936) 
A.B., Bethany College; B.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. 

Harry Lawrence Ice, Director of Ministerial Training and Professor of Religion and 
Philosophy. (1944) 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Ph.D., George Washington University; D.D., Bethany 
College. 

Erwin C. Paustian, Professor of Sociology. (1944) 

A.B., Central Wesleyan College; A.M., Northwestern University; University of Chi- 
cago; University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Paul Warren Ellis, Prof essor of Economics and Business Administration. (1945) 

A.B., Willamette University; A.M., University of Oregon; Ph.D., Columbia Univer- 
sity. 

Richard Chaffey von Ende, Professor of Music. (1945) 

A.B., A.M., Carnegie Institute of Technology; Grove City College; Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh; Pennsylvania State College. 

Charles Flemming Brown, Professor of Chemistry. (1946) 
A.B., M.Sc, Ph.D., West Virginia University. 



1 On leave of absence from October 20, 1945 to February 1, 1946. 

2 On leave of absence in service with U. S. Navy during 1 945-1 946. 



Chandler Shaw, Associate Professor of History. (1935) 

A.B., Rollins College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; American Academy 
in Rome; Royal University, Perugia, Italy. 

Earl D. McKenzie, Associate Professor of Modern Languages. (1937) 

A.B., Brown University; A.M., Columbia University; University of Frankfort am 
Main; Yale University; University of Pittsburgh. 

1 George W. Bennett, Associate Professor of Chemistry,, (1943) 

B.S., Denison University; M.S., Washington and Jefferson College; University of 
Pennsylvania; Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

2 Wilbur John Sumpstine, Assistant Prof essor of Biology and Geology. (1925) 

B.S., Bethany College; West Virginia University; M.S., University of Chicago; Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. 

Margaret Carrigan, Social Director and Assistant Prof essor of English. (1939) 
A.B., Columbia University; A.M., Syracuse University; Cornell University. 

Edgar Hugh Behymer, Librarian with rank of Assistant Prof essor. (1941) 

A.B., Indiana University; A.B.L.S., University of Michigan; A.M., University of 
Chicago. 

Bradford Tye, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. (1943) 

B.S., Alma White College; Rutgers University; M.S., New York University; Columbia 
University. 

Stuart Wilson McFarland, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administra- 
tion. (1946) 
B.S., Ohio University; A.M., Ohio State University; State University of Iowa. 

Carl L. Spicer, Assistant Professor of History. (1946) 
B.Sc, A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

'James Wagner Alexander, Instructor in English. O940) 

A.B., A.M., University of Georgia; University of Perugia; University of Padua; Uni- 
versity of Grenoble; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

4 Pauline Eley, Instructor in Economics and Business Administration. (1942) 
A.B., Western Kentucky State Teachers College. 

Margaret Roberts Woods, Instructor in Modern Languages. (1943) 

A.B., Wellesley College; A.M., Pennsylvania State College; Middlebury College; 
Columbia University; Colorado College; University of Besancon; University of San 
Luis Potosi. 



1 Resigned June 9, 1946. 

2 Deceased September 30, 1945. 

3 On leave of absence in service with U. S. Army. 

4 Resigned May 4, 1946. 



1 Blandina Foster, Instructor in English. (1944) 

A.B., Albright College; A.M., University of Michigan; Duke University; New York 
University. 

Elizabeth Jean Murphy, Instructor in Biology. (1944) 

B.S., Bethany College; M.S., University of New Hampshire. 

George K. Hauptfuehrer, Instructor in Music. (1945) 

A.B., B.M., Friends University; A.M., University of Kansas. 

James Blair Miller, Instructor in Religious Education. (1945) 
A.B., Bethany College; B.D., Yale University. 

S. Elizabeth Reed, Instructor in Physical Education. (1945) 

A.B., Muskingum College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; University of Wisconsin; 
New York University. 

Ralph B. Holter, Instructor in Music. (1946) 

B.Ed., Minnesota State Teachers College; University of Minnesota; Lawrence College. 

Daniel Chalmers McLean, Instructor in Chemistry. (1945) 

B.S., Tufts College; M.S., Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. 

John Gerald Patterson, Director of Admissions and Alumni Secretary with rank of In- 
structor (1946) 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., University of Virginia 

Mary Louise Truxal, Instructor in English (1946) 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Priscilla Allen, Instructor in English (1946) 

A.B., West Virginia University; A.M., Cornell University. 

, Instructor in Economics and Business Administration (1946) 



-, Instructor in Physical Education (1946) 

-, Instructor in Music (1946) 

-, Associate in Modern Languages (1946) 



1 Resigned June 9, 1946. 



ADMISSIONS AND PERSONNEL OFFICE 

Alberta Frances Quinlin Recorder 

A.B., Bethany College; Columbia University. 

Helen Jane Shriner Psychometrist and Associate in Student Personnel Administration 

A.B., Pennsylvania College for Women; University of Pittsburgh 

Agnes O'Masta Associate in Student Personnel Administration 

BUSINESS OFFICE 
Harry Milton Myers Bookkeeper 

Dessie Mae Rupe Assistant Bookkeeper 

Virginia Franz Cashier 

COLLEGE LIBRARY 

Edgar Hugh Behymer Librarian 

A.B., Indiana University; A.B.L.S., University of Michigan; A.M., University of 
Chicago. 

Joseph N. Whitten Assistant Librarian 

A.B., Mississippi College; George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Charles Penrose Assistant Librarian 

A.B., LL.B., College of William and Mary in Virginia; A.B.L.S., University of Michi- 
gan. 

Margaret S. Irby Cataloguer 

A.B., North Texas State Teachers College. 

2 Robert Lee Martin Cataloguer 

A.B., Bethany College; A.B.L.S., Peabody College for Teachers. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Edgar Wade Mahan, M.D College Physician 

A.B., Bethany College; M.D., University of Maryland. 

Catherine Springer, R.N College Nurse and Supervisor of Infirmary 

Gladys C. Gibson, R.N Associate Nurse 



1 Resigned March I, 1946. 

2 For part of the year. 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Lucille Ball Head Dietitian and Dormitory Manager 

A.B., Bethany College; University of Pennsylvania. 

Clayton E. Benedict Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

George C. Hettler Executive Secretary 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Lillian Wilson Manager, Bethany House 

Secretary to the Recorder 

Nancy Cowen Secretary to the President 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Flora Jane Dye Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Mary Jane Helfer Secretary to the Dean of Students 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Constance Patricia McBride Secretary to the Dean of the Faculty 

Secretary to the Executive Secretary 

Elsa Myers Secretary in Department of Ministerial Training 

Pauline Potts Secretary to the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

RESIDENCES FOR WOMEN 

Margaret Carrigan, Head of Residence and Social Director 
Mary Belle Carman Ethel D. Metzner 

Vira M. Hettler Elsie Porterfield 

Grace Hine Margaret Wilson 

Bess Magee Margaret Woods 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Admissions and Classifications 

Mr. Kirkpatrick, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Weimer 

Athletics and Physical Recreation 

Mr. Leitch, Mr. Knight, Miss Reed, Mr. Booth 

Audio and Visual Aids 

Mr. Eliassen, Mr. Allen, Mr. Shaw, Mr. von Ende 

Campbell Mansion and College Memorabilia 

Mr. Stevenson, Mr. Behymer, Mr. Green, Mr. Shaw 

Gans Awards 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Allen, Mr. Brown, Miss Hoagland 

Honors 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. McKenzie, Mr. Paustian, Mr. Spicer 

Lectures and Concerts 

Mr. Booth, Miss Carrigan, Mr. Roberts, Mr. von Ende 

Library 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Behymer, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Leitch 

Religious Life 

Mr. Stevenson, Mr. Ellis, Miss Mahaffey, Mr. Miller 

Scholarships and Financial Aids 

Mr. Kirkpatrick, Mr. Cramblet, Mr. Patterson 



Council on Instruction 

Mr. Weimer, Mr. Behymer, Mr. Kirkpatrick, Heads of Major Departments 

Council on Alumni and Public Relations 

Mr. Patterson, Mr. Hettler, Mr. Ice, Mr. Kirkpatrick, Mr. Weimer 

Council on Student Affairs 

Mr. Kirkpatrick, Mr. Booth, Miss Carrigan, Miss Hoagland, Mr. Weimer 



PART II 

ADMISSION 

EXPENSES 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



ADMISSION 



General Requirements — Only young men and young women 
who are well qualified to benefit from the type of educational 
experience and academic life available at Bethany College will be 
admitted. All applicants for admission must furnish evidence of 
good moral character, sound physical and mental health, adequate 
scholastic preparation, and intellectual maturity. The Committee 
on Admissions and Classifications will consider the best interests 
of the applicant and the college before final acceptance is made. 

Only students who are graduates of first grade high schools or 
preparatory schools with class rank in the upper half should apply. 
It is expected that all applicants will be taking regular academic 
work as candidates for a baccalaureate degree. 

All applicants for admission must have been vaccinated within 
the past three years, or they must arrange to be vaccinated by the 
Student Health Service within one month after entrance unless 
excused by the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. 

Freshman Admission — Applicants for admission to the fresh- 
man class will be judged acceptable in terms of scholastic prepara- 
tion and intellectual maturity by any one of the following three 
plans: 

I. By Certificate 

Graduates of any accredited high school or secondary school 
may be admitted to freshman standing on presentation of state- 
ment signed by proper school authorities, showing the kind and 
the amount of scholastic work done, provided: 

(a) the scholastic work completed is of such quality as to place 
the student in the upper half of his graduating class. Excep- 
tions to this will be made only upon adequate evidence from 
scholastic aptitude tests administered at the college on days 
designated by the Chairman of the Committee on Admis- 
sions and Classifications. 

(b) the students record indicates the completion of at least 
fifteen acceptable units of secondary school work. Students 
from senior high schools may be admitted with eleven units 
of senior high school work.* 

* Note: Not less than one-half unit will be accepted in any subject and not less than one 
unit will be accepted in any foreign language, algebra, plane geometry, chemistry, physics, 
or shorthand. 



22 Bethany College Bulletin 

(c) two-thirds of the units of secondary school work accepted 
for entrance must be in English, foreign languages, mathe- 
matics, natural sciences, and social studies. These units 
should normally include three units of English, at least 
three units of a foreign language or social studies, and two 
units of mathematics or science. In the case of graduates of 
senior high schools the same general pattern of units is 
desired. 

II. By Examination 

Students who have not been regularly prepared for college 
in a recognized secondary school may apply for admission by mak- 
ing a complete statement regarding qualifications and training. 
Such students can be regularly admitted if they qualify in a bat- 
tery of examinations on general educational development given 
at the college under the direction of the Committee on Admissions 
and Classifications. The examinations will be given upon the 
scholastic work covered by the list of secondary units approved by 
the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

College Entrance Board Examination certificates will be ac- 
cepted in lieu of high school certificates or examinations by 
Bethany College. 

III. By Cumulative Record 

The Committee on Admissions and Classifications will 
receive cumulative standard test records and other objective data 
which may give evidence of an applicant's ability to profit by 
college experience. Such records or data should (i) cover at least 
the three most recent years of the applicant's school life, (2) pro- 
vide fairly reliable information as to his intellectual capacity, (3) 
include an accurate record of the results of comparable achieve- 
ment measures in various academic subjects. Data obtained from 
all tests will be interpreted in authenticated comparable terms, 
such as well established public school or independent school 
percentiles. 

Advanced Standing — Students from other accredited colleges 
may be admitted upon the presentation of evidence that they have 
satisfied the general requirements for admission and that they 
were in good standing in the institution last attended. All applica- 
tions for admission from students for advanced standing must be 



Bethany College Bulletin 23 

accompanied by official certificates stating the nature and extent 
of college courses completed and all disciplinary or academic items 
that belong to such a record. Such a statement must be signed by 
the president or other official of the institution where the work was 
done. 

The evaluation and acceptance of credits earned at an accredited 
institution will depend upon the quality of the academic work 
completed. Only a minimum of academic work ranked below 
"average" (grade C) will be accepted. Not more than sixty-five 
hours will be allowed for junior college work. 

Effective as of 1945-1946, all former students who have been 
in the Armed Services for any length of time and may now be clas- 
sified as Veterans of World War II will be allowed eight semester 
hours of academic credit with record made as follows: 

^Physical Education and Personal Hygiene 8 semester hours 

* granted for service in World War II 
The granting of this credit will automatically relieve all such 
students from taking the courses in Physical Education which are 
required for the baccalaureate degrees. 

This credit will be in addition to, and not counted as duplicating, 
courses in Physical Education which the student may have already 
completed. This credit will not bar him from taking any additional 
courses in Physical Education and it will not count as satisfying 
any courses in Physical Education which may be specifically re- 
quired to complete a major in that department. 

Some academic credit may be allowed for training courses and 
educational experiences in the Armed Services by the Committee 
on Admissions and Classifications according to the general pat- 
tern recommended by "A Guide to the Evaluation of Educational 
Experiences in the Armed Services" issued by the American Coun- 
cil on Education, provided such courses or experiences are ap- 
propriately related to a college of liberal arts and sciences. 

Credit will be allowed for work done in non-accredited institu- 
tions only by special action of the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications. This Committee may require that the applicant 
be classified one class below that attained in the institution from 
which the credits were presented. 

A student transferring to Bethany cannot be granted a degree 
unless he has been in attendance at the college at least during his 
senior year. 



24 Bethany College Bulletin 

Special Students — A very limited number of students who are 
not candidates for a degree may be admitted to the college as 
"Unclassified Students" with permission to pursue selected courses. 
Approval for enrollment in this manner will be given only if the 
applicant can satisfy the Committee on Admissions and Classifica- 
tions that he can pursue the courses with profit, that he has a 
serious purpose in mind, and that he can meet the general re- 
quirements as to health, character, and mental ability. 

Advanced Standing by Achievement Tests — Any students 
who have anticipated the subject matter of any of the prescrip- 
tions for degrees listed under the requirement of hours may make 
application to take an achievement test. If the result of this test 
indicates sufficient mastery of the subject the prescription will be 
waived. Passing the achievement tests will not give credit in hours 
toward the degree. The application for an achievement test should 
be made to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. It 
should state the achievement tests which the student desires to 
take and the basis of his preparation for the test. 

Placement Tests for Freshmen — For purposes of educational 
guidance all freshmen are required to take placement examinations 
in certain academic subjects such as English, history, and foreign 
languages. These examinations are given before the final registra- 
tion at the beginning of the college year in order that failures due 
to misplacement in courses may be avoided if possible. The type 
of examination used is designed to test the readiness with which 
the student can adapt his knowledge to the requirements of college 
work. The results of these examinations are used to determine a 
students placement in courses and in sections. 

Evaluation and Registration — The college recognizes the 
need of giving its newly entering students some introduction to 
their work, and for this purpose it requires freshmen to come to 
Bethany two or three days before the formal registration of all 
other students. This "Freshman Week" is devoted to efforts to 
help the freshmen get a proper adjustment. 

The time designated for "Freshman Week" will be used for the 
following activities: 

a. Registration and payment of fees. 

b. Physical examination. 

c. Placement and achievement tests which will enable the 
faculty to place the student in the classes for which he is best 
fitted. 



Bethany College Bulletin 25 

d. Getting acquainted with the faculty, staff, and equipment 
of the college. 

e. Conferences with the faculty counselor as to educational and 
vocational program. 

Attendance during "Freshman Week" is required of all who will 
enter as freshmen. The dates for the 1946-1947 session are Septem- 
ber 15 to 18, 1946. 

Method of Enrollment — All business matters related to the 
enrollment of new students are in charge of the Director of Admis- 
sions. The proper form to be used in making application for admis- 
sion and blanks to be used in making application for a room in one 
of the college dormitories will be supplied by his office. The Ap- 
plication for Admission and the Admission Fee of $ 10.00 should be 
filed as early as possible. These should be mailed directly to the 
Director of Admissions. 

The application form requires rather complete data as to the 
applicant's personal and educational background together with an 
official record of his scholastic preparation. The Committee on 
Admissions and Classifications will review applications within 
three weeks after they are received and notice of action taken 
will be sent directly to the applicant. 

Reservation of Dormitory Rooms — All rooms in college 
dormitories must be engaged in advance, and an advance payment 
must be made on the student's account at the time the room is 
reserved. In case the student remains in the dormitory for the full 
year, the Admission Fee will be refunded, except for proper charges 
for breakage and inspection. In the case of withdrawal from the 
dormitory — or from college — after room reservation has been filed, 
the Admission Fee and the advance payment are forfeited by the 
student. An applicant for admission who finds that it will be im- 
possible to enter college can get a refund of these payments if no- 
tice is given to the Director of Admissions on or before July 1, 
1946. 

Plans showing the arrangement of rooms in the dormitories, 
detailed statement of prices, and reservation blanks may be ob- 
tained from the Director of Admissions. 



EXPENSES 



Tuition — The tuition for each semester is one hundred and 
fifty dollars for fifteen academic hours or less. For each academic 
hour in excess of fifteen, an additional ten dollars is charged. No 
charge is made for activity courses in physical education taken to 
meet graduation requirements. 

Tuition for special students carrying less than twelve hours is 
twelve dollars and fifty cents per semester hour. Special fees will 
be charged as usual in such cases. 

By special action of the Board of Trustees, members of families 
of home and foreign missionaries actively in service are allowed 
free tuition for regular academic work at the college. 

Admission Fee — A fee of ten dollars is required with each Ap- 
plication for Admission. At the time a student enrolls at the college 
this fee becomes a breakage deposit on the room of a student living 
in one of the college dormitories. The college reserves the right to 
make legitimate charges against the room and breakage deposit 
fee for any damage done to the room or its furnishings, and to 
declare forfeiture of the key deposit fee if keys are not returned 
immediately after the room is vacated. If the applicant is not plan- 
ning to live in a college dormitory, the fee will be applied on the 
tuition charge. 

The college may require the student to replace the breakage de- 
posit to the total of $10.00 at any time. The breakage deposit, or 
balance remaining thereof, will be refunded to the student after 
the end of the academic year if the student has not made reserva- 
tion of a dormitory room for the next year. 

Room Payment Deposit — To reserve a room in a college dormi- 
tory an advance payment of twenty-five dollars must be made on 
or before June first. This represents the first payment on the room 
rental charge and is required of new students as well as students 
already living in dormitory rooms. This is in addition to the ad- 
mission fee or breakage deposit mentioned above. 

If a student fails to occupy the room for the full year for any 
reason, the advance payment will be forfeited. 



Bethany College Bulletin 27 

Health, Library, and Matriculation Fee — A health, library, 
and matriculation fee of ten dollars each semester is charged to all 
students. 

Student Activities Fee — A student activities fee of ten dollars 
each semester is charged to all students. This fee covers partial 
expenses in connection with athletic competitions and contests, 
lectures and concerts, and a variety of social and extra-curricular 
activities directly managed by the Student Board of Governors. 

MEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS 

Cochran Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $75.00 per 
semester for each student. Single and double rooms are provided. 

Bedspreads and curtains are furnished and laundered for all 
residents. Young men rooming in this hall are expected to furnish 
their own bed linen, blankets, towels, study lamps, and rugs. 
They are expected to care for their own rooms. 

Supplemental Dormitories — The F. P. H. A. has agreed to 
furnish temporary dormitory housing for students attending the 
college and eligible for education and training under Public Law 
16 or Public Law 346. These buildings are arranged in suites with 
accommodations for four men in each suite. These facilities are to 
be operated with rates and management plan approved by the 
F. P. H. A. They will be available in 1 946-1 947. 

WOMEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS 

Phillips Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $75.00 per 
semester for each student. Most of the rooms in this building are 
for two residents. 

Gateway Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $75.00 per 
semester for each student. Most of the rooms in this building are 
for two residents. 

Young women rooming in these dormitories are expected to 
furnish curtains, bed linen, bedspreads, blankets, towels, study 
lamps, and rugs. They are expected to care for their own rooms. 

Dormitory Houses — These buildings include Helwig Hall, 
Colonial House, and such other dwelling houses as may be avail- 
able. 

Rooms in certain of these houses are reserved for young women 
affiliated with sorority groups. They are rented by the individual 



28 Bethany College Bulletin 

student who signs a rental contract for her room under the same 
conditions which apply in other residence halls but the sorority 
group is responsible for providing a minimum number of oc- 
cupants. If this number is not provided the group can be charged 
a monthly rental to take care of the loss of income to the college. 

The rent for rooms in these houses is $70.00 per student when 
operated as a dormitory by the college. When the house is occupied 
by a sorority group, the rent is $65.00 per student. Single and 
double rooms are available. 

Young women in any of the college dormitory houses are ex- 
pected to furnish curtains, bed linen, bedspreads, blankets, towels, 
study lamps, and rugs. They are expected to care for their own 
rooms. 

Accommodations for Married Students — The college is 
operating Point Breeze as a cooperative home for married students. 
A competent manager is in charge. Occupants are responsible for 
the care of their own rooms and share in the operation of a common 
dining room. Accommodations are available for eleven couples. 
A limited number of apartments and private rooms are available 
in the community. Charges for rent vary from $25.00 to $40.00 per 
month. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS IN ALL RESIDENCE HALLS 

Permission for the installation of radios and special electrical 
equipment in any of the halls must be obtained from the Head of 
Residence and a charge may be assessed for such items. 

Room assignments in all college dormitories are made for the 
academic year. For freshmen they are made in the order of applica- 
tion; for upperclassmen, in the order of class membership, supple- 
mented by the drawing of lots. Any request for a change of assign- 
ment must be approved by the officer in charge, and a new contract 
issued. Preference is given to upperclassmen only for a limited 
time. 

Single and double rooms are available in all residence halls. 
Double rooms may not be reserved by one student without extra 
charge. 

Residence halls will be open for freshmen for each semester the 
day before Freshman Days, and for upperclassmen the day before 
registration. 

Residence halls will be closed when college is not in session. 



Bethany College Bulletin 29 

Bethany College reserves all rights in connection with the as- 
signment, termination of occupancy, and reassignment of rooms 
in all dormitories. 

BOARD 

All students in residence at the college are expected to board at 
college dining halls. Young women will board at Phillips Hall. 
Young men will board at the Bethany House. The price of board is 
figured at the rate of $8.00 per week. The price of board is subject 
to revision at any time to conform to change in general price levels. 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR SEMESTER 

Tuition $150.00 

Room in College Dormitory $6$ .00 to $75 .00 

Board at College Dining Hall ($8.00 per week) $136 .00 

Student Activities Fee $10.00 

Health, Library, and Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Total required fees for semester $371 .00 to $381 .00 

MISCELLANEOUS FRESHMAN FEES 

Admission Fee (All new students) $ 10.00 

(This fee must be paid before any action is taken on 
Application for Admission.) 

Freshman Days Fee. (First term or semester only) $ 10.00 

(Freshman Evaluation and Orientation Program, etc.) 

Deposit for Dormitory Room Key $ 1 .00 

To the above costs must be added fees for special courses, the 
cost of books, clothing, laundry, travel, and personal spending 
money. The cost of books for the college year (two semesters) 
averages $25.00 to $40.00. The other items are not unusual but 
will be determined by the individual student. 

The college is required to collect the West Virginia Sales Tax of 
2% on room and board in addition to published charges for the 
same. 

LABORATORY AND COURSE FEES 

Biology ii, 12, 36, 48, S3, 54, 57, (>S> 67, rf, 
78 $ 8 .00 per semester 



30 Bethany College Bulletin 

Biology 34 6 .00 per semester 

Biology 91, 92 (each hour) 8 .00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 65, 66 8.00 per semester 

Chemistry 25, 26, 61, 62 12.00 per semester 

Chemistry 91, 92 (each hour) 8 .00 per semester 

Economics 32 8 .00 per semester 

Education 63 5 .00 per semester 

Education 81, 82 20.00 per semester 

Mathematics 21 , 24, 25 5 .00 per semester 

Physics 2i, 31, 32, 3$ y 53, 63, 64, 67, 68 5.00 per semester 

Physics 91, 92 (each hour) 5 .00 per semester 

Psychology $3, 62, 64 5 .00 per semester 

Secretarial Studies 11, 12, 53 6.00 per semester 

Speech and Dramatics 71, 73, 74 2 .00 per semester 

MUSIC FEES 

Private Lessons, two lessons a week, per semester $50.00 

Private Lessons, one lesson a week, per semester 30.00 

Organ Practice, one hour each day, per semester 20.00 

Piano Practice, one hour each day, per semester 5 .00 

Piano Practice, three hours per week, per semester 3 .00 

Practice Room for instrumental music, one hour each day 

per semester 2 .00 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Comprehensive examination for students not in residence . . $25 .00 
Each academic hour when less than twelve, per semester. . 12.50 

Each change in registration after first two weeks 1 .00 

Freshman Days fee 10 .00 

Graduation and diploma fee 10.00 

Infirmary charge, per day (after three days) 1 .00 

Late registration, first three days, per day 2 .00 

Radio use fee, per semester 50 

Room reservation fee for upperclassmen 5 .00 

Special examinations in any department or course 2.00 

Special placement or achievement test in any department . . 2 . 00 
Transcript fee (after first issue) 1 .00 



Bethany College Bulletin 31 

BREAKAGE AND GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 

Certain fees are charged to cover cost of materials placed in the 
hands of students or as a guarantee of proper performance of 
duties assigned. Unused balances of these fees are refunded at the 
end of the college year. 

Biology 34 $ 5 .00 per semester 

Biology 53, 54 3 .00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 75, 76, 91, 92 3.00 per semester 

Chemistry 25, 26 6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 61, 62, 6$, 66 7.00 per semester 

Chemistry 81, 82 (travel) 10.00 per semester 

Deposit on lock in gymnasium 1 .00 

Guarantee Deposit for Student Employment 5.00 
Key deposit for all dormitory rooms 1 .00 

NOTE: A deposit on locker keys is charged to all students en- 
rolling in activity courses in physical education or to those re- 
serving lockers in the gymnasium for personal use. 

SUMMER TERM EXPENSES 

Tuition for courses taken during the Summer terms of the col- 
lege will be charged at the rate of ten dollars per credit hour. 
Charges for required and special fees will be determined in the light 
of services available to the individual student. Board and room 
will be determined on the basis of time the student is in residence 
at the rate of $1 1 .50 per week. The West Virginia Sales Tax of 2% 
must be collected on room and board. 

Scholarships and other forms of student aid will be available on 
the basis of arrangements made with the individual student. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Tuition, room rent, student fees, health and matriculation fees, 
and other special fees are due and payable on Registration Day of 
each semester. Board in Phillips Hall and the Bethany House is 
charged for the entire semester and must be paid at least two weeks 
in advance. All accounts are payable to the Bursar of Bethany 
College. 

Upon request, a period of two weeks after the opening of the 
semester may be allowed for the payment of tuition, room rent, 



yi Bethany College Bulletin 

and fees as listed on the invoice. It is required in each case, how- 
ever, that the student shall make a minimum cash payment of at 
least #50.00 on the Registration Day of each semester. Students 
are not considered to be properly enrolled any semester until this 
minimum payment has been made. Scholarship awards or other 
grants cannot apply on the required minimum payment. In case 
the student's account is less than #50, full payment of the same is 
required in advance. 

All accounts must be paid in full within two weeks after registra- 
tion. For the first semester of 1 946-1 947, the final day for settle- 
ment of accounts is October 2, 1946, and for the second semester 
the final day is February 17, 1947. In some cases, arrangements 
may be made for a deferred payment on accounts. When tuition, 
room rent, and fees are not paid on the Registration Day, the 
same are charged with an additional ten per cent carrying charge 
which is added to the college account. This carrying charge is 
cancelled upon any part of the account that is paid during the 
two weeks period. After that day, this charge becomes a part of the 
regular account and must be settled for under terms described 
below. There can be no change in the tuition or fees charged a 
student because of a reduction in credit hours in his schedule of 
courses after the first two weeks of any semester. 

When arrangements have been made to take care of the stu- 
dent's account by deferred payment, an Application for Deferred 
Payment, addressed to the Committee on Financial Aids, must 
be filed in the Bursar's Office before or at the time of registration. 
This application must state the student's willingness to sign a note 
to cover the balance due to the college. These notes must be signed 
by the student and endorsed by the parents or guardian. These 
are drawn so that the installments will fall due on the fifteenth of 
each month in amounts agreed upon in connection with the ap- 
proval of the application for deferred payment. These notes, 
properly executed, must be in the Bursar's Office before the end 
of the period of two weeks allowed for the settlement of accounts. 

No student will be allowed to take final examinations or to re- 
ceive academic credit for any kind in any semester until all his 
financial obligations to the college have been met. In case a student 
withdraws from college, all charges except certain special fees are 
refunded on a pro rata basis, figured to the end of the week in 
which the withdrawal takes place. Scholarship awards are not ap- 



Bethany College Bulletin 33 

plied on the accounts of students who withdraw before the end of 
the semester. 

Freshmen will register Monday, September 16, 1946, and 
"Freshman Week" fee is payable on this day at the Bursar's 
Office. The "Freshman Week" fee covers board and room for the 
days of this week that are given over to freshman orientation and 
academic placement activities. 

Final registration for freshmen is on Wednesday morning, Sep- 
tember 18, 1946 and all accounts for freshmen are payable at that 
time. All other students will register and make payment of their 
college accounts on Wednesday, September 18, 1946. Registration 
for the second semester is February 3, 1947, and all second semes- 
ter accounts are payable on that date. 

Students certified under Public Law 16 or Public Law 346 are 
required to make provision for the minimum cash payment of 
$50.00 on Registration Day of each semester if they are living in 
college dormitories and taking their meals in college dining halls. 
This will be credited as an advance payment for room and board. 
Additional payments are required each month for the succeeding 
month. 

Any veterans of World War II who are admitted to the college 
without certificates of entitlement from the Veterans Administra- 
tion are required to make the same financial arrangements as all 
other students. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AIDS 



FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS 

Honor Scholarships — A limited number of scholarships to the 
amount of $250 may be awarded to entering freshman students 
who rank in the highest honor group of their secondary school 
graduating class. These provide a stipend of } 100 for the freshman 
year, $75 for the sophomore year, and $75 for the junior year. The 
award will not be continued beyond the freshman year if the stu- 
dent fails to maintain an academic point average of 1.5. 

Trustee Scholarships — A limited number of scholarships to 
the amount of $175 may be awarded to entering freshmen who 
rank high in their secondary school graduating class and who 
would not be able to attend college without such financial help. 
Such a scholarship provides a stipend or #75 for the freshman year, 
$50 for the sophomore year, and $50 for the junior year. The 
award will not be continued beyond the freshman year if the 
student fails to maintain an academic point average of 1.25. 

Competitive Scholarships — Early in the spring the college 
holds a competitive examination for high school seniors, and 
scholarships are awarded to students making top scores on the 
examinations. These awards are on the basis of $1 50 for each of the 
four college years. An academic point average of 1.5 after the 
freshman year must be maintained in order to have the stipend 
continued. 

Regional Alumni Scholarships — Ten regional alumni scholar- 
ships are to be awarded to freshmen of unusual ability upon recom- 
mendation of alumni groups in various districts. These scholarship 
awards are for an amount of $600 applicable on the tuition account 
of the student at the rate of $75 per semester. The scholarship may 
be discontinued at any time the student fails to make an academic 
point average of 1.5 at the end of any one semester. 

To be eligible for any one of these awards, the student must 
come from the upper quarter of his high school or preparatory 
school graduating class, he must have demonstrated interest in 
extracurricular activities by active participation, he must be well 
recommended by responsible school officers, and he must have the 
endorsement of the Bethany alumni in his area. 



Bethany College Bulletin 3$ 

General Regulations — All scholarships for freshmen are 
awarded by the Committee on Financial Aids after consultation 
with the Dean of Students and the Director of Admissions. The 
stipends that go with each scholarship award are applied on the 
tuition charge on the basis of one-half for the first semester and 
one-half for the second semester. Applications must be filed with 
the Director of Admissions at least three weeks prior to the date of 
admission to the college. All applications from new students must 
be accompanied by a transcript of secondary school work and the 
required Application for Admission and Admission Fee. 

Students will be eligible to receive only one award. Students 
qualifying for more than one must select the award which they 
prefer to accept. 

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UPPERCLASSMEN 

Trustee Scholarships — Sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
may apply for scholarship awards to the amount or $50 to $150, 
which have been authorized by the Board of Trustees for students 
above the freshman rank who maintain a high grade of academic 
work and who would be unable to continue in college without such 
financial assistance. It is expected that in each case the applicant 
shall have met the following conditions: 

1. His academic record must be above 1.25 average in the aca- 
demic year preceding the application. 

2. His financial obligations to the college must be met promptly. 

3. His influence on the student body should be in every sense 
wholesome. 

4. His continuance in college should depend upon some financial 
assistance. 

5. He shall have made a worthwhile contribution to the life of 
the college and the college program. 

Scholarships of $150 are not usually awarded to students who 
have other forms of financial aid such as student employment. 
Academic standing and accomplishment are the chief criteria for 
scholarship awards. 

It is understood that the following reasons will operate to cancel 
this scholarship for the next semester: 

1. Failure to maintain an academic point average of 1.25. 

2. Serious academic censure for any cause. 

3. Unsatisfactory conduct. 



36 Bethany College Bulletin 

All applications for scholarships awards from members of the 
student body must be filed with the Committee on Financial Aids 
three weeks before the end of the semester. Applications received 
after that time cannot be acted upon for the next college year. 

Designated Scholarships — The following scholarships have 
been especially designated by friends of the college and are subject 
to such special provisions as are mentioned. 

Mary A. Morrison Scholarship — This is a scholarship cover- 
ing three-fourths of the cost of tuition. 

Isaacs Mills Scholarship — This scholarship covers a part of 
the tuition charge, the benefits of which are to be received by a 
ministerial student. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship — This scholarship of $100 per 
semester applies on tuition. The student receiving the benefits of 
the same is to be nominated by a member of the Willett family. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship — This scholarship covers $30 on 
tuition cost per semester. 

Albert C. Israel Scholarship — This scholarship yields $20 
per semester to apply on tuition of a descendant of Albert C. 
Israel. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship — The income from this scholar- 
ship fund is awarded for the purpose of helping students who are 
preparing for the mission field or the ministry. The students who 
receive the benefits of this scholarship are to be nominated by the 
donor. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship — The income from this scholarship 
fund is awarded to students who have reached the senior year in 
their college course. The students receiving benefits from this 
scholarship are to be nominated by the Dean of Students. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship — A scholarship endowed in 
memory of Mr. Herbert Moninger, a graduate of the college. 

Josiah Wilson Scholarship — As a memorial to Josiah N. and 
Wilmina S. Wilson and Nora B. Wilson a scholarship fund was 
established by Josiah N. Wilson. The income is used to aid some 
student or students who are preparing for the Christian ministry. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarships — -Scholarships covering a part 
of the tuition charge. The students who receive the benefits of 
these scholarships are to be nominated by the President of the 
College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Awards — The income from a fund of 



Bethany College Bulletin 37 

$8,000 set up by the will of Mrs. Minnie W. Schaefer of Mt. 
Vernon, Ohio, to be awarded to students planning for definite 
Christian service. 

J. T. Smith Awards — The income from a fund of $17,500 es- 
tablished by J. T. Smith of Memphis, Tennessee, to be made 
available for students preparing for the Christian ministry or some 
other form of Christian service. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship Fund — The in- 
come from a fund of $20,000 set up by the will of Clarinda Pendle- 
ton Lamar, in memory of her father, William Kimbrough Pendle- 
ton, member of the first faculty and second president of the college 
(1 866-1 889), is to be awarded in one or more scholarships each 
year to one or more citizens of West Virginia. These awards may 
be in the form of loans or outright gifts as determined by the 
Committee on Financial Aids. 

The Gans Fund Awards — Awards are made in this fund to 
juniors and seniors at Bethany College and to graduates of Beth- 
any College engaged in study and research elsewhere who have 
shown "evidence of merit and promise in the field of science." 
Funds so awarded will be available for approved study and re- 
search in some specific field. 

Rhodes Scholarships — Men who have completed their 
sophomore year at Bethany College are eligible to compete for the 
Cecil Rhodes Scholarship, tenable for three years at Oxford Uni- 
versity, England. These scholarships are awarded on the com- 
bined basis of character, scholarship, athletic ability, and leader- 
ship in extra-curricular activities. Further information may be 
obtained from the Dean of Students. 

Foreign Exchange Fellowships — Each year at least two 
students direct from foreign countries come to Bethany to study 
on fellowships provided by the college administration. These 
students come to interpret their own people and their national 
culture to American student life. These awards are made only to 
students who are recommended by the Institute of International 
Education. 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

Bethany College Loan Funds — Loans from the Bethany 
College Funds may be obtained by students on complying with 
the conditions governing the same. Approved security is required 



38 Bethany College Bulletin 

from all those borrowing from the fund. These loans are without 
interest while the student is in Bethany College and notes are 
drawn to mature four months after graduation or withdrawal from 
college. All notes bear interest from the date of their maturity. 

Applications for loans must be made to the Committee on 
Financial Aids. All financial obligations to the college including 
notes to the loan fund must be paid before an official transcript of 
the student's academic record can be issued. 

Student Employment — Limited opportunities for students to 
earn money for college expenses are afforded, but under no circum- 
stances is it possible for a student to earn all of his expenses. The 
college may not be able to provide student employment of any 
kind beyond $100 as a total for one year. 

Applications for student employment must be filed on a proper 
form and must be accompanied by a deposit of $5.00 as a guarantee 
of faithful performance. A careful study of the student's needs and 
general welfare will be made by the committee caring for student 
employment as each application is considered. Applications for 
student employment should be filed with the Executive Secretary. 

Prospective students should not consider beginning a college 
career unless adequate financial arrangements have been made for 
at least the first year. A few students may find it possible to earn 
enough money to pay a considerable part of their expenses. It is 
advisable, however, for new students to adapt themselves aca- 
demically before attempting outside work. 

PLACEMENT 

The Admissions and Personnel Office is concerned with Place- 
ment service and its facilities are available for students and 
prospective employers. It assists students needing to secure part- 
time employment while attending college and those who need to 
find summer work; it helps members of the graduating class who 
are seeking their first positions or making applications for gradu- 
ate fellowships; and it gives as much assistance as possible to 
alumni on request. The office does not undertake to find employ- 
ment for anyone or to assume the responsibility for making all 
contacts with prospective employers. 



GRADUATION AND HONORS 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Degrees — Bethany College confers at graduation the degrees 
of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. The fulfillment of the 
several specified requirements and genuine evidence of attain- 
ments in scholastic proficiency are demanded of all candidates for 
degrees. 

Requirement of Hours — Candidates for either of the bac- 
calaureate degrees are required to complete a total of 126 semester 
hours for graduation. Of this number forty semester hours must be 
in courses in the upper division and six semester hours must be in 
physical education. Only twelve hours in applied music can be 
used toward meeting the minimum requirement. 

Distribution Requirement — Candidates for graduation are 
required to complete course work in several of the major depart- 
ments of the college. Such courses have been designated by the 
faculty as representing an introduction to "general education. " 
The following specific course requirements must be met by all 
candidates for the baccalaureate degree: 

English composition or literature 6 hrs. 

Foreign language — 

A reading knowledge of one of the foreign languages 
offered at the college or approved by the Commit- 
tee on Admissions and Classifications. This re- 
quirement may be satisfied by the completion of 
the second year course in the language at the col- 
lege level; or by written and oral examination 
given under the direction of the Department of 
Modern Language or the Department of Classics. 

Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics 6 hrs. 

Biblical Literature, i.e., courses in Old and New 

Testament 6 hrs. 

History, Political Science, Economics, or Sociology. . .6 hrs. 

Psychology, Philosophy, or Education 6 hrs. 

Physical Education, i.e., two hours in personal hy- 
giene and four hours in activities courses 6 hrs. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must present at 



40 Bethany College Bulletin 

least forty semester hours from courses taken in Biology, Chemis- 
try, Mathematics, or Physics. Of these forty semester hours, at 
least twenty-five of them must be in the upper division. 

Requirement of Quality Points — Quality points awarded on 
the basis of final grades received are required for graduation. At 
least 126 quality points must be earned and of these at least forty 
must be earned in upper division courses. 

Requirement of Major — The department in which a student 
elects to major shall determine specific requirements for the stu- 
dent, not only of work to be done in the major department, but 
certain other work to be done in other departments that must be 
completed to buttress the major, The general outline of require- 
ments for each major is listed in the section of this bulletin that 
carries courses of instruction. With the approval of the Dean of 
the Faculty certain modifications can be made to meet the needs 
of the individual student. 

It is expected that no major will include less than 24 semester 
hours and that at least 12 semester hours must be completed in 
courses definitely in the upper division. At least 24 quality points 
must be earned in the major field. These represent the minimum 
for the college. The department offering the major may require 
more than this minimum. In all cases the counselor will expect the 
student to complete a large part of his major work in the upper 
division. 

The major may be confined to the work of a single department, 
or related departments may offer "functional majors" embracing 
work in two departments, if the work is planned and administered 
as "an integrated" unit. 

Requirement of Minor — In addition to the major each stu- 
dent must elect a minor subject. The professor in charge of the 
major subject should approve the minor selected. In most cases 
it should have some relationship to the major. At least 18 semester 
hours must be completed in the minor. A minimum of 18 quality 
points is required in the minor. 

Requirement of Examination — A comprehensive examina- 
tion — both written and oral — is required of each candidate for a 
degree at Bethany College. This examination is given by a faculty 
committee under the direction of the professor in charge of the 
major subject, and it is intended to cover the total range of ma- 
terial and accomplishment for an undergraduate major. A student 



Bethany College Bulletin 41 

failing in the comprehensive examination shall be considered as 
failing to meet the requirements for graduation and shall not be 
graduated. 

Seniors who pass the comprehensive examination with high 
credit shall be awarded their degrees "with distinction" in the 
major subject. The only other grades given are "passed" and 
"failed." 

Seniors who fail to pass the comprehensive examination shall, 
upon payment of a suitable fee, be given a second opportunity 
only at the end of any subsequent semester, provided reasonable 
notice has been given to the Committee on Admissions and 
Classifications and the department head. Further opportunity to 
take this examination shall be given only by special vote of the 
faculty. 

Residence Requirement — Four years are usually required to 
satisfy the requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Students of 
superior quality may satisfy the requirements in less time. The 
senior year should be spent in residence at the college. 

HONORS 

Graduation Honors — Students who have done college work 
of unusual merit and have given evidence of superior academic 
achievement in the upper division will be graduated with honors. 
These are awarded with the degree as Summa Cum Laude, 
Magna Cum Laude, and Cum Laude. The awarding of honors is 
determined upon the basis of total quality points earned, standing 
in the comprehensive examination, and the recommendation of the 
professors in charge of the major and minor. 

Students who give evidence of superior achievement in the 
major subject and are able to pass the comprehensive examination 
with excellent results will be designated as "passed with dis- 
tinction." 

Class Honors — Upper division students of the college who 
complete the academic work of any one year with a point average 
of 2.5 are recognized for "First Honors" for the year, and those 
who complete the academic work of any one year with a point 
average of 2.25 are recognized for "Second Honors" for the year. 
Lower division students of the college who complete the academic 
work of any one year with a point average of 2.25 are recognized 
for "First Honors" for the year, and those who complete the 




42 Bethany College Bulletin 

academic work of any one year with a point average of 2.0 are 
recognized for "Second Honors" for the year. 

Dean's List — At the end of each semester a list of students 
who have ranked high in academic attainments as attested by 
academic point average are designated for the Dean's List. This 
distinction is determined by the Dean of the Faculty and the Dean 
of Students. 

Senior Fellowships — Upon careful recommendation certain 
members of the junior class are designated as Senior Fellows dur- 
ing the following year. The selection is made only of students who 
have attained unusual excellence in the field of their major study 
and who, by character and ability, can do special work in a major 
department, as an assistant in some phase of instruction or re- 
search. The Senior Fellowship carries a small stipend. No more 
than six senior fellowships are awarded in any one year. 

The selection of Senior Fellows is made by the Committee on 
Honors from the nominations of the department head. It is in- 
tended that each Senior Fellow shall be given the fullest freedom to 
pursue the intellectual life and he shall have the benefit of tutorial 
instruction in the department in which he works. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa — This honorary scholastic fraternity was 
organized at Bethany College in 1932. Students are eligible for 
membership under the following conditions: maintenance of a 
quality point average of 2.25 for four consecutive semesters, pro- 
vided that in no semester their quality point average falls below 
an average of 2.0, and, further, students must be recommended by 
the faculty Committee on Honors. 

Pi Gamma Mu — The West Virginia Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma 
Mu is located at Bethany. Its members are selected from students 
who have maintained a high average in at least twenty semester 
hours of social studies. 

Anna Ruth Bourne Award — A cup has been given the college 
by an anonymous donor to be known as the Anna Ruth Bourne 
Scholarship cup. This cup is awarded to the sorority or non- 
sorority group on the campus earning the highest scholarship 
standing each semester. The group winning the large cup for four 
consecutive semesters is presented with a smaller cup which is a 
replica of the large cup. 

Pittsburgh College Club Award — The Pittsburgh College 
Club, which comprises the college alumnae of Pittsburgh, has set 



Bethany College Bulletin 43 

up an award which is made each year to the outstanding girl in the 
junior class. This award is based on academic record, qualities of 
leadership, character, conduct, and general standing on the cam- 
pus. The club has placed a suitable plaque in Phillips Hall on which 
the names of the winners are engraved. In addition, an individual 
award is made each year to the junior girl chosen. 



PART III 
DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 

Courses of instruction are listed by departments. 

In numbering of courses first semester courses have odd numbers and 
second semester courses, even numbers. A course having both an odd and 
even number, as 11-12, runs continuously throughout the year, but may 
be elected for either semester unless the course is specifically designated "a 
continuous course," providing proper prerequisites are met. In registering 
for a course through the year, the odd number is used the first semester, 
and the even, the second semester. 

A limited number of courses in various departments will be offered dur- 
ing the summer term. The specific courses to be offered in the summer term 
of 1946 will be announced in a special bulletin. 

The number in parenthesis after the name of the course indicates the 
academic credit given for each semester. The names of the instructors fol- 
low the description of the course. 

The curriculum of the college recognizes the lower and upper divisions 
in the arrangement of courses and the numbers of each course. The lower 
division covers, roughly, the freshman and sophomore years and the upper 
division, the junior and senior years. Courses in the lower division are 
numbered from 11 to 49, and in the upper division from 50 to 100. 

A course may not be offered, if elected by less than five students. 



ART APPRECIATION 

31-32. Introduction to Art. (3 hrs.) 

Development of the architecture, sculpture, and painting of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Eu- 
rope in relation to the civilization of which they are a permanent expression. Not offered in 
1 946-1 947. 

Miss Mahaffey 
33-34. Renaissance and Modern Painting. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the Italian masters and of the leading painters of Europe and England. In the sec- 
ond semester a study is made of American painting. 

Miss Mahaffey 



BIOLOGY 

B. R. Weimer, Head of the Department 

Elizabeth Murphy, Instructor 

Lorraine Marron, Associate 



Aims: 



The courses are intended to acquaint the student with the living world around him 
and the fundamental dynamic life processes; to demonstrate scientific methods of 
approach to problem solutions; to cultivate an attitude of inquiry and research; to 
develop laboratory skill in various types of work in zoology, botany, and related fields; 
and to train students as teachers of biology and for certain professional work related 
to this field. 

Students who plan to teach or become professional biologists should elect the following 
sequence of courses: Biology 11-12, 36, 43, 48, $3> 57, 65, 67, 78, 81, and 91 or 92. 

Students preparing for work in medicine, dentistry, nursing or as laboratory tech- 
nicians should elect the following sequence of courses: Biology 11-12, 36, 43, 53, 76, 
78, 81, and 91 or 92. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four semester hours in the department following a sequence of courses 
approved by the head of the department. A minimum of twelve semester hours of 
chemistry, at least six of which are organic chemistry, is desirable. 

A minor should be elected in a laboratory science. Either German or French should be 
elected to meet the graduation requirement for foreign languages. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen semester hours in the department exclusive of Biology 34 and Biology 
85. 



48 Bethany College Bulletin 

11-12. General Biology. (3 hrs.) 

Systematic study of the fundamental structures and life processes of plants and animals, 
including man, and their important inter-relationships. Required of all pre-medical stu- 
dents. Note: The satisfactory completion of the first semester of this course may be sub- 
stituted for Physical Education 15 or 16. 

Mr. Weimer, Miss Murphy, Miss Marron, and Assistants 
34. Our Outdoors, (i hr.) 

A general survey course in the field of man's natural environment from the standpoint of 
geology and biology. Estimated cost of the course to the student exclusive of tuition, includ- 
ing field trips, food, and minor incidentals: $5.00 to $8.00. Not open to freshmen. Enroll- 
ment limited to fifteen. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Murphy and others 
36. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. (4 hrs.) 

Study of the comparative anatomy of the representative forms of vertebrates. Laboratory 
study of the comparative anatomy of the shark, Necturus, and cat. Prerequisite, Biology 
11-12. Required of all pre-medical students. 

Mr. Weimer, Miss Murphy, and Assistants 
43. Heredity and Eugenics. (2 hrs.) 

A general course covering modern theories and laws of heredity and their relation to man. 
Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Weimer 
48. Plant Ecology and Local Flora. (2 hrs.) 

The identification of the common seed plants and ferns by the use of manuals and the 
study of the relation between plants and their environment. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12 
or high school biology. 

Miss Murphy 

53. Bacteriology. (3 hrs.) 

Morphology and physiology of yeasts and bacteria; principles of laboratory technique, cul- 
tural characteristics, and environmental influences on bacterial growth. Not offered in 
1946-1947. 

Miss Murphy and Assistants 

54. Industrial Bacteriology and Clinical Methods (3 
hrs.) 

A practical laboratory course with occasional lectures, dealing with the bacteriology of 
water and milk, and the general food bacteriology. Some study of the elementary techniques 
in clinical methods such as blood work and urine analysis. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Murphy 
57. Advanced General Botany. (3 hrs.) 

An advanced study of the structural relationships of various type forms of the plant king- 



Bethany College Bulletin 49 

dom together with a study of the fundamental life processes of plants; growth, irritability, 
food synthesis, and metabolism. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. 

Mr. Weimer 
6$. Invertebrate Zoology. (3 hrs.) 

Survey of the invertebrate animals including phylogeny and morphology. A laboratory 
study of representative forms of invertebrates will be made. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. 

Miss Murphy 
67. Physiology (3 hrs.) 

A study of the structure and functions of the human body and the mechanism of bodily 
movements, responses, reactions, and various physiological states. Prerequisites, Biology 
11-12, and Biology 36. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Murphy 
76. Histology. (3 hrs.) 

Structure of the cell and its modification into various tissues. Special attention will be paid 
to the theory and practice of general histological technique. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 
and Biology 36. 

Miss Murphy and Miss Marron 
78. Vertebrate Embryology. (4 hrs.) 

Nature and development of the tissues and organs in vertebrates. Embryos of chick and 
pig are studied in the laboratory. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biology 36. 

Mr. Weimer and Assistants 

81. Contemporary Biological Investigations and Litera- 
ture. (1 hr.) 

A survey of the fields of biological investigations and the current literature relating to in- 
vestigations in those fields. Open only to juniors and seniors. Required of all Biology 
majors. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and Biology 36. 

Mr. Weimer 

85. Methods and Materials in Teaching Biology. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

86. Marine Biology. (4 to 6 hrs.) 

Credit is given for summer courses taken at the Marine Biological Station at Woods Hole, 
Massachusetts, or at any other station of similar rank. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A course in theoretical and advanced morphological biology. The problem may be selected 
by the student, subject to the approval of the instructor, according to interest and future 
needs and may be in either: 

a. Advanced comparative anatomy of vertebrate or invertebrate types not previously 
studied; or 

b. Review of the literature relating to various fields of investigation in biology; or 



5<d Bethany College Bulletin 

c. Study of some problem in biological research. 
No registration for the course will be permitted without previous conference with the in- 
structor. Open only to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12; 36 and 6$, or 36 
and 78, and superior achievement in these courses. 

Mr. Weimer and Miss Murphy 



CHEMISTRY 

Charles F. Brown, Head of the Department 
Daniel C. McLean, Instructor 



Aims: 



It is the aim of the department to contribute to the student's general culture, his un- 
derstanding of the nature of the physical world and his understanding of the place of 
chemistry in industrial and business life; to provide training in the scientific method 
of reasoning; and to provide major students with a thorough and practical training in 
chemistry which may be useful in industrial, technical, or educational work. 

Students who plan to become professional chemists should elect the following sequence 
of courses: Chemistry 11-12, 25-26, 61-62, 65-66, and 75-76. Physics 31-32; Mathe- 
matics 11-12, 31-32; English 11-12; and a minimum of 16 hours in the humanities 
above other required courses. German is the specified language. 

Students preparing for work in medicine, dentistry, nursing, teaching, or as laboratory 
technicians should elect the following sequence of courses: Chemistry 11-12, 25 or 26, 
61-62, 71, and 87-88. Courses in mathematics, physics, biology, modern languages, 
and the humanities are recommended in accordance with the student's choice of field 
of major interest. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four semester hours in the department following a sequence of courses 
approved by the head of the department. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen semester hours in the department. 

11-12. General Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A first course in chemistry which conforms to the standards set up by the Division of Chem- 
ical Education of the American Chemical Society. Prerequisite to all other chemistry 
courses. 

Mr. Brown, Mr. McLean, and Assistants 



Bethany College Bulletin 51 

25-26. Quantitative Analysis. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in quantitative analysis for professional chemists and engineers. 

Mr. Brown 
61-62. Introductory Organic Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in organic chemistry. The laboratory work consists of preparations and 
an introduction to organic qualitative analysis. 

Mr. Brown 
6^-66. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A course designed to conform to the requirements of the American Chemical Society for 
the training of professional chemists. Enrollment limited to advanced students and on 
approval of instructor. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. Brown 
71. Elementary Physical Chemistry. (3 hrs.) 

A brief introduction to selected areas in physical chemistry for premedical students. Three 
lecture-recitations per week. 

Mr. Brown 
75-76. Physical Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in physical chemistry. Three lecture-recitations and one laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisites, Chemistry 25-26, 61-62; Physics 31-32; and Mathematics 

Mr. Brown 
81-82. Engineering Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

Unit operations of chemical engineering and industrial stoichiometry. Enrollment limited 
to advanced students and on approval of instructor. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. McLean 
87 or 88. The Literature of Chemistry, (i hr.) 

Bibliographic, biographic, and historical problems for library searches. Prerequisites, Chem- 
istry 25-26 and 61-62. 

Mr. McLean 
91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Independent laboratory investigations of an original nature. 

Members of the Department 



52 Bethany College Bulletin 

CLASSICS 
, Head of the Department 

Aims: 

To develop the ability to read classical Greek and Latin literature with some degree of 
fluency and appreciation; to understand the influence of Greek and Latin on modern 
thought and expression; to prepare students for the teaching of Latin, ministerial 
students for the study of the New Testament; and to provide background materials 
for the student who is interested in linguistics or archaeology. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours in the department with a sequence of twenty hours in either Greek 
or Latin. Each major student must undertake some minor research in either Greek 
or Latin in the problems course (Classics 91-92). Students who expect to teach Latin 
will find Greek very important in their undergraduate courses and practically indis- 
pensable for any graduate study of the language. History 6$ y Philosophy 61-62, and 
Art Appreciation 31-32 are strongly recommended for all students majoring in this 
department. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours are required for a minor. The sequence of courses must be approved by 
the head of the department. History 65 is recommended. 

Greek 
11-12. Elementary. (3 hrs.) 

The essentials of Attic Greek grammar, and reading from classical Greek literature. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Green 
31-32. New Testament Greek. (3 hrs.) 

The Gospel of Luke and the grammar of the Greek New Testament. In the second semester 
some Pauline Epistles will be studied. Prerequisite, Greek 1 1-12. 

Mr. Green 
51. Xenophon. (3 hrs.) 

The Anabasis. Prerequisite, Greek 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1947. 



52. Plato. (3 hrs.) 

Apology and Crito. Prerequisite, Greek 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



53-54. Greek Tragedy. (3 hrs.) 

Selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Prerequisite, Greek 31-32. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 



Bethany College Bulletin $3 

Latin 
31-32. Vergil's Aeneid. (3 hrs.) 

The epic will be studied with a literary as well as a linguistic purpose. Critical approach to 
the poet and his work. Prerequisite, two units of Latin from a secondary school. Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 



51. Cicero's de Amicitia and de Senectute. (3 hrs.) 

Prerequisite, Latin 31-32 or equivalent. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



52. Tacitus. (3 hrs.) 

Germania and Agricola will be read with study of style and interpretation. Prerequisite, 
Latin 51. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



$3. Cicero's Letters. (3 hrs.) 

A number of Cicero's letters will be read showing Cicero's tastes and relations to personal 
and literary friends. Prerequisite, Latin 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



54. Horace. (3 hrs.) 

This course will include the reading of Odes and Epodes with selections from the Satires. 
Prerequisite, Latin 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



63-64. Latin Composition. (2 hrs.) 

A thorough review of forms and syntax. A course in the writing of Latin especially intended 
for students who expect to teach the subject. Prerequisite, Latin 51-52 or 53-54. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 



85. Teaching of Latin. (2 hrs.) 

Special methods in the teaching of Latin. Intended for those who are preparing to teach. 
Open only to students majoring or minoring in the subject. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



91-92. Problems in Classics. 

Subjects, hours, and credits for special study in the classics to be arranged individually with 
the instructor. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



54 Bethany College Bulletin 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Paul W. Ellis, Head of the Department 

Stuart W. McFarland, Assistant Professor 

, Instructor 

Aims : 

The aims of the courses in economics and business administration are to give the 
students an understanding and appreciation of economic principles and problems, to 
furnish them a basis for intelligent citizenship in dealing with economic problems, and 
to equip them with fundamental and some technical preparation for business and 
accounting vocations, for graduate and professional study, and for the teaching of 
Economics. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four semester hours in the department following a sequence of courses 
approved by the head of the department. Fifteen semester hours of the major must be 
in upper division courses. 

Students who plan to concentrate their work in economics should elect the following 
sequence of courses: Economics 43-44, 47 or 48, 88 or 89, 91 or 92; Business Adminis- 
tration 45; Sociology 31; Political Science 59. Other business administration courses 
will not count toward this major sequence. 

Students who plan to concentrate their work in business administration should elect 
the following sequence of courses: Business Administration 45, 47 or 48, 61, 63; Eco- 
nomics 43-44; Political Science 59. Other economics courses will not count toward this 
major sequence. 

Students who plan to do graduate work in economics are advised to obtain a reading 
knowledge of both French and German. Students who plan to do graduate work in 
business administration are advised to concentrate in economics, and to limit the 
amount of specialized courses in business administration. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen semester hours in the department following either of these two sequences: 
Economics 43-44, 47 and nine hours to be approved by the head of the department; or 
Business Administration 45, 47, 61 and nine hours to be approved by the head of the 
department. 

Economics 
32. Economics of American Industry. (3 hrs.) 

A descriptive study of the nature of the principal industries in the United States, of the 
competitive conditions in each, and of their relation to the economic system as a whole. 
Iron and steel, metal fabricating, and non-metallic mineral and chemical processing, textile, 



Bethany College Bulletin 55 

apparel, food, and other industries will be studied. Particular attention will be given to the 
industries of the Ohio River Valley. Field trips will be taken to some of the major industrial 
plants of the valley. Open to freshmen. 

Mr. Ellis and 

34. Economic Geography. (3 hrs.) 

See Geography 34. 

43-44. Principles and Problems of Economics. (3 hrs.) 

The nature, scope, and organization of economic activity in our modern society. Money and 
banking; price theory; business cycles; distribution of national income; foreign economic 
relations; problems of labor, agriculture, and consumers; government finance; and func- 
tions of government in relation to economic activity. Not open to freshmen. 

Mr. Ellis and 

47 or 48. Principles of Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

Basic theory and method applied to practical, social, economic, and business problems. 
Manual of problems is used in application of the mean, mode, and standard deviation. 
Preparation of graphs and charts. 

Mr. McFarland or Mr. Kirkpatrick 
51. Money and Banking. (3 hrs.) 

Our present monetary and banking systems and their development, with emphasis on the 
Federal Reserve System, and on changes in theory, conditions, and practices since 1932. 
Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Ellis 
S3. Corporation Finance. (3 hrs.) 

See Business Administration 53. 

55-56. Public Finance. (3 hrs.) 

The expenditures, revenues, and debts of the federal, state, and local governments. Includes 
study of source materials and principles, with analysis of effects on corporation policies, 
economic stability of the country, and distribution of income. Prerequisite, Economics 
43-44. A continuous course. 

Mr. Ellis 
57. Transportation. (3 hrs.) 

The development of railway, waterway, and aerial transportation and the economic princi- 
ples applying to transportation services. Government regulation, and railway labor legisla- 
tion are also studied. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 



58. Public Utilities. (3 hrs.) 

Place and nature of public utilities; franchises; regulation; service standards; rate making; 



56 Bethany College Bulletin 

valuation; rate of return; standards of accounting; capitalization; holding companies; 
public relations. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

67. Labor Problems. (3 hrs.) 

See Personnel Administration 67. 

69. Labor Legislation. (3 hrs.) 

See Personnel Administration 69. 

82. Economics of Adjustment to Peace. (3 hrs.) 

The impact of the war upon our economic system and the problems of adjustment to a 
permanent peacetime basis. Emphasis will be placed upon problems of government finance, 
unemployment, international trade, and government controls over economic processes. 
Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. 

Mr. Ellis 

83. National Income and Its Distribution. (3 hrs.) 

The nature of national income estimates and a study of the distribution of income by in- 
dustrial groups, by types of income, and by sizes of income. The nature of the uses of these 
estimates in modern economic and business analysis and forecasts. Prerequisites, Eco- 
nomics 43-44 and 47. 

Mr. Ellis 

84. Business Cycles. (3 hrs.) 

The nature of business fluctuations, theories concerning their causes, proposals for con- 
trolling cyclical behavior, and measures of economic change used as business indicators. 
Prerequisites, Economics 43-44 and 47. 

Mr. Ellis 
88 or 89. History of Economic Thought. (3 hrs.) 

The outstanding writers and ideas are studied in relation to the conditions that led to the 
major developments in economic thinking; classical economic theory, the challenge of Karl 
Marx, the marginal school, Thorstein Veblen, monopolistic competition, John Maynard 
Keynes, and current trends of thought. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44 or consent of in- 
structor. Primarily for seniors who are majors or minors in Economics. Not offered in 1946- 
1947. 

Mr. Ellis 
91-92. Seminar in Economics and Business. (3 hrs.) 

Independent and group study in business and economic research. Particular attention is 
given to the needs and interests of individual students and to the conditions of the Ohio 
River Valley. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44 and 47. Primarily for seniors who are majors 
or minors in Economics and Business Administration. 

Mr. Ellis and members of the Department 



Bethany College Bulletin 57 

Business Administration 
45-46. Introduction to Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of accounting through the corporate approach. Working papers, statements, ad- 
justments, controlling accounts, the voucher register, forms of business organization, 
manufacturing accounts, inventories, manufacturing costs, bonds, and consignments. 
A continuous course. Not open to freshmen. 

Mr. McFarland 
47 or 48. Principles of Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 47 or 48. 

49. Practicum in Personnel Administration. (2 hrs.) 

See Personnel Administration 49. 

$3. Corporation Finance. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of financial management of corporate enterprise; promotion; current ad- 
ministration, expansion, failure and reorganization, and security regulation. Prerequisite 
Economics 43-44. 

Mr. McFarland or 

61. Business Organization. (3 hrs.) 

The organization and management of business enterprise. An introductory course to the 
general field of business, including finance, management, accounting, sales, production, 
plant layout. Enrollment limited to advanced students or on approval of instructor. 

Mr. McFarland or 

63. Principles of Marketing. (3 hrs.) 

Study of marketing functions and institutions; cost of distribution; functions of manu- 
facturers, wholesalers, and retailers in the transfer of goods or services from the producer to 
the consumer. Enrollment limited to advanced students or on approval of instructor. 

Mr. McFarland 

64. Retailing. (3 hrs.) 

Purchasing, receiving, and pricing merchandise. Emphasis on the retail store. Stock con- 
trol, salesmanship, fashion, employee relationships, credit and collections, retail advertising. 
Prerequisite, Business Administration 47 and 63. 

Mr. McFarland 
66. Sales and Sales Management. (3 hrs.) 

Sales and market research, product planning and policy, distribution policy, prices and 
terms, sales promotion. Prerequisite, Business Administration 47 and 63. Not offered in 
1 946-1 947. 

Mr. McFarland 



58 Bethany College Bulletin 

68. Industrial Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 68. 

70. Personnel Administration. (3 hrs.) 

See Personnel Administration 70. 

73-74. Business Law. (3 hrs.) 

Study of legal principles and cases as they apply to business, including contracts, agency, 
negotiable instruments, and business organization. Attention to personal property, security 
relations, real property, trade regulations, government in business. A continuous course. 

Mr. McFarland and 

75. Intermediate Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Theory and practical applications involving problems of valuation of assets and liabilities, 
reserves, depreciation, capital accounts and profits, dividends and corporate consolidation. 
Prerequisites, Business Administration 45-46. 

Mr. McFarland 

76. Cost Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

General methods of collecting costs of material, labor, and burden and incorporating them 
in the books of account; operation reports and cost statistics; interpretation of cost data 
for commercial and industrial organization; elimination of waste through proper costing. 
Prerequisite, Business Administration 75 or approval of instructor. 

Mr. McFarland 
78. Auditing. (3 hrs.) 

The procedure and practices of the public accountant in verifying accounts and supple- 
mentary data, and the preparation of findings and reports in conformance with the purpose 
of the audit. Prerequisite, Business Administration 75. 

Mr. McFarland 

86. Methods of Teaching Accounting and Socio-Business 
Subjects. (3 hrs.) 

Examination of the methods of teaching high school accounting, economic geography, 
business law, and introduction to business. Consideration of problems in developing busi- 
ness education offerings in the small high school. Enrollment limited to advanced students 
or on approval of instructor. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. McFarland 
91-92. Seminar in Economics and Business. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 91-92. 



Bethany College Bulletin 59 

Secretarial Studies 
11. Typewriting. (3 hrs.) 

A beginning course for those who wish to acquire a working knowledge of typewriting for 
personal and incidental vocational use. 



12. Advanced Typewriting. (3 hrs.) 

A continuation of Secretarial Studies n. Speed and accuracy development will be empha- 
sized with attention to the preparation of manuscripts, thesis, and business forms. Pre- 
requisite, Secretarial Studies n or equivalent. 



15. Elementary Shorthand. (3 hrs.) 

Elements of shorthand theory with attention to vocabulary and writing techniques. A speed 
of 60 words per minute will be attempted during this first semester. Prerequisite, Secretarial 
Studies 1 1 or equivalent. 



16. Advanced Shorthand. (3 hrs.) 

A continuation of Secretarial Studies 15 with timed dictation and transcription leading to 
speeds usually in excess of 100 words per minute and a transcription speed amounting to 
30 words per minute. Prerequisite, Secretarial Studies 12 and 15, or equivalents. 



53-54. Secretarial Practice and Office Management 
(3 hrs.) 

This course is based on an activity program of simulated and actual experiences and repre- 
sentative types of office situations. The general principles, procedures, and systems of 
filing, including sufficient practice with laboratory sets to develop facility and skill. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 



EDUCATION 
R. H. Eliassen, Head of the Department 

F. H. Kirkpatrick, Professor 

Aims: 

This department seeks to develop in all students a wholesome and intelligent attitude 
toward public education; to stress a thorough understanding of human growth and 
development; to cultivate thinking about problems in education; to integrate its work 
with that of other departments in a well-rounded liberal and professional education 



60 Bethany College Bulletin 

of prospective teachers who may qualify for teaching in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West 
Virginia, and other neighboring states; and to offer some technical preparations for 
guidance work. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in the department, with a sequence of courses ap- 
proved by the head of the department. At least six hours in psychology is required. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Twenty hours in the department, with a sequence of courses approved by the head of 

the department. 

I 

Teacher Training: 

Students who are interested in teaching should confer with the head of the Depart- 
ment of Education as early as possible, preferably during the freshman year and not 
later than the beginning of the upper division work. 

31-32. Human Growth and Development. (3 hrs.) 

An orientation course in developing an understanding of individual and group develop- 
ment through childhood and adolescence. The second half of the course is a study of the 
nature and direction of learning in accord with principles of child development. This course 
satisfies the certification requirements for orientation and educational psychology. 

Mr. Eliassen 

51. History and Philosophy of Education. (3 hrs.) 

Current philosophies of education are studied through a general survey of educational 
theory and practice from the days of Ancient Greece to the present day. 

Mr. Eliassen 

52. Principles of Education. (3 hrs.) 

Social and scientific principles that influence education in America as well as immediate and 
ultimate aims to be realized. Experiments and innovations in school practices; important 
issues and trends. 

Mr. Eliassen 
57. Human Adjustment. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 57. 

61. Educational Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 61. 

62. Measurement of Intelligence. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 62. 



Bethany College Bulletin 6i 

63. Educational Measurements. (3 hrs.) 

Techniques for the measurement and evaluation of educational competence and develop- 
ment. Construction, validation, use, and interpretation of standard measurements and 
their relation to the educative process. Elementary methods for handling quantitative 
data. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick and Assistant 
6$. Visual and Auditory Education. (2 hrs.) 

Special methods and materials of visual and auditory techniques in education, including 
motion pictures and radio. Laboratory experience with both visual and auditory equip- 
ment; lesson planning with these aids. 

Mr. Eliassen and Mr. Kirkpatrick 
72. Educational and Vocational Guidance. (2 hrs.) 

General introduction to functions and procedures related to vocational and educational 
guidance. Counseling, records, tests, inventories, and occupational information. Organiza- 
tion for guidance in the schools. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick or Mr. Eliassen 
74. Educational Administration. (2 hrs.) 

Studies functions of the teacher in administration of schools, as well as the principal, 
superintendent, and the board of education. The inter-relationships of federal, state, and 
local functions and control are considered. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Eliassen 
81 or 82. Observation and Directed Teaching. (6 hrs.) 

This course is offered each semester and includes observations, participation activities and 
student teaching under supervision in the public schools. Students should not register for 
more than 16 semester hours of work during the semester in which this course is carried. 

Mr. Eliassen and Critic Teachers 
85 or 86. Special Methods. (2 or 3 hrs.) 

Many departments of the college co-operate in offering courses in the teaching of the corre- 
sponding secondary school subjects. These courses present the most approved methods in 
teaching subjects at the secondary school level. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. • 

Mr. Eliassen and others 
91 or 92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Independent study and investigation in the field of professional education. Open only to 
students of unusual ability and adequate background in the field of education. 

Mr. Eliassen or Mr. Kirkpatrick 



62 Bethany College Bulletin 

ENGLISH 

Florence M. Hoagland, Head of the Department 

E. E. Roberts, Professor 

Margaret Carrigan, Assistant Professor 

Priscilla Allen, Instructor 

Louise Truxal, Instructor 
Aims: 

This department is intended to prepare all students for a more intelligent and apprecia- 
tive reading of the materials in all branches of knowledge; to furnish students with a 
comprehensive knowledge of the English language and literature in preparation for 
creative writing, graduate study, or as a cultural discipline; to provide background and 
some technical training for students preparing for professional writing or journalism; 
and to train students to speak effectively in public. 

Requirement for Major: 

I. Sequence of courses for students who plan to teach English, to prepare for graduate 
study, or to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of the English language and literature: 
English 31-32 and a minimum of eighteen hours in literature courses in the upper di- 
vision approved by the head of the department according to individual need. Students 
planning to enter graduate schools should elect English SS~S^' A reading knowledge of 
Latin is required by many graduate schools. Either French or German should be 
elected to meet the foreign language requirement for graduation. History 70 and 
Philosophy 53-54 are recommended. 

II. Sequence of courses for students who plan to prepare for journalism, professional 
writing, graduate study, or teaching in journalism: Journalism 53-54 and twelve semes- 
ter hours in journalism courses. English 31-32 must be included and six additional 
hours in literature. A minimum of twenty-four hours is required for a major. 

Requirement for Minor: 

For students electing a minor under sequence I, at least eighteen hours in the division 
of literature. English 31-32 must be included. 

For students electing a minor under sequence II, at least twelve hours in Journalism 
and English 31-32. 

For students electing a minor in Speech and Dramatics, at least eighteen hours in the 
division. English 31-32 is required. 

Composition 
11-12. Composition and Literature. (3 hrs.) 

First semester: emphasis on fundamentals of composition with writing in various forms; 
review of grammar. Second semester: greater emphasis on content and style in composition 
and instruction in the technique of preparing a research paper; vocabulary study. Selected 
readings in both semesters. 

Members of the Department 



Bethany College Bulletin 63 

Literature 
31-32. Backgrounds of English Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A comparative study of some of the masterpieces of the western world which are closest to 
our cultural and intellectual heritage. 

Miss Hoagland 
51-52. American Literature to 1900. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of American literature as an aspect of American culture, as a development of 
thought in America, and in relation to the life and literature of the western world. Special 
emphasis on Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Whitman, and Mark Twain. Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Carrigan 
^. Growth and Structure of the English Language. 
(3 hrs.) 

The course will deal historically with the language, its early grammar, its foreign borrow- 
ings. Readings from the poetry and prose of the old English period. Not offered in 1946- 
1947. 

Miss Hoagland 
$6. Chaucer and Middle English. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of Middle English literature. Special study of the Canterbury Tales and some of 
the minor poems which reveal the development of Chaucer's skill. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Hoagland 
57-58. Shakespeare. (3 hrs.) 

Principal plays of Shakespeare. Four plays will be studied closely each semester; nine or 
ten others will be read more rapidly. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Hoagland 

59. The Renaissance. (3 hrs.) 

Non-dramatic literature of the English Renaissance will be studied; special emphasis on 
Spenser, Prerequisite, English 31-32. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Miss Carrigan 

60. The Seventeenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

From Donne and the metaphysical poets through the age of Dryden. Prose and poetry will 
be studied, special emphasis on Milton. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Carrigan 
61-62. The Eighteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Interpretation of the literature and social life of the eighteenth century. Emphasis on 
Defoe, Steele and Addison, Pope, Swift, Johnson and his circle. Drama: Congreve through 
Sheridan. Poetry: Collins and Gray through Blake. Novels: Selected from Richardson, 
Fielding, Sterne, and Jane Austen. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Hoagland 



64 Bethany College Bulletin 

64. The Romantic Period. (3 hrs.) 

The poetry of the romantic movement from 1785 to 1832. Emphasis on Coleridge, Words- 
worth, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

Miss Hoagland 
6$-66. Victorian Literature. (3 hrs.) 

The poetry and prose of the Victorian age with emphasis on Carlyle, Tennyson, and Arnold 
in the first semester. A study of Browning, Morris, Swinburne, and Hardy in the second 
semester. Prerequisite, English 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Carrigan 
69-70. Contemporary Literature. (3 hrs.) 

Poetry, novel, and drama. Drama from Ibsen to Odets; poetry from Bridges to MacLeish; 
novel from James to Cather. Prerequisite, six semester hours in English literature or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Miss Hoagland 
86. Teaching of English. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 86. 

87-88. Seminar in English Literature, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A course for advanced students majoring in English. A correlating and supplementing of 
the work done in previous courses. Extensive reading. 

Miss Hoagland 
91-92. Problems in Literature, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Conferences, papers, and reports on minor research problems. Limited to seniors of superior 
achievement who are majoring in English. 

Miss Hoagland 
Journalism 

53. Reporting. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the techniques and values in news reporting and writing. Emphasis on learning 
to write clearly, forcefully, and distinctively. Writing of daily news stories, weekly features, 
and all types of newscopy. 

Mr. Roberts 

54. Journalistic Types. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the essay, satire, short story, feature, biography, and magazine article, with 
written work concentrated upon one type to be selected by the student. 

Mr. Roberts 

63. Features. (3 hrs.) 

The writing of twenty special features for magazines and trade journals, and the submission 
of at least ten articles for publication. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. Roberts 



Bethany College Bulletin 65 

64. Advanced Features. (3 hrs.) 

The writing of twenty features which must be approved and submitted for publication. 

Mr. Roberts 
6$. Advertising. (3 hrs.) 

A study of department store, financial and business advertising programs. Buying motives, 
sales appeals, copywriting, economic aspects, research media, and production. Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Roberts 
66. History of American Journalism. (3 hrs.) 

Journalistic backgrounds followed by a development of American newspapers and maga- 
zines from colonial days to the present. A parallel study of the rise of advertising. Present 
day trends of news dissemination. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Roberts 

71. Radio and Play Writing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of modern plays and radio scripts. Objectives include development of speed in 
writing and smoothness of style; learning to plan, prepare, and edit reliable, newsworthy 
and interesting broadcasts. 

Mr. Roberts 

72. Contemporary Reporting Problems. (3 hrs.) 

A study of reporting in specialized fields such as labor news, science and business news. 
Some study of government news releases techniques and the publicity methods and prob- 
lems of large corporations. 

Mr. Roberts 



Mr. Roberts 



91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Advanced writing projects in the field of greatest student interest. 

Speech and Dramatics 

41. Foundations of Speech. (3 hrs.) 

An introductory survey course to the speech arts with emphasis on voice and diction, 
phonetics, voice science, speech organization, and delivery. 

Mr. Booth or Miss Allen 

42. Public Speaking and Debate. (3 hrs.) 

Practical application of the principles of speech. Study of speech construction, practice in 
formal and extemporaneous speaking, debate, and discussion. Prerequisite, Speech 41, or 
permission of the instructor. 

Mr. Booth or Miss Allen 



66 Bethany College Bulletin 

53-54. Play Production. (3 hrs.) 

A course designed to promote an understanding and appreciation of the theatre through the 
learning of techniques in acting and theatre crafts, costume, make-up, stage lighting, 
scenery design, and construction. Students participate in the preparation of Guild Theatre 
productions. 

Miss Allen 

71. Oral Interpretation. (3 hrs.) 

A study of techniques of oral reading. Consideration of monologues, stories, ballads, lyrics, 
and dramatic poetry and prose. Principles of analysis, empathy, attention, imagery. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 41, or permission of the instructor. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Miss Allen 

72. Argument. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the principles of logic and psychology which underlie the art of persuasion, fol- 
lowed by practice in application of the theories developed. Prerequisite Speech 41-42, or 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to twenty students. 

Mr. Booth 
73-74. Introduction to Radio Speech. (3 hrs.) 

Consideration of the organization of radio programs of various types, writing of scripts, 
microphone technique, studio operation, and the vocational possibilities of radio speech. 
Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Miss Allen 



GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

34. Economic Geography. (3 hrs.) 

Study of world production and distribution of food supplies, power, resources, and raw ma- 
terials for manufacture, with reference to the natural and economic determining factors. 
Open to freshmen. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 



35. Principles of Geography. (3 hrs.) 

A discussion of the general principles of the science including such topics as earth origins 
and the results of the dynamic geographical agencies tending to change its surface. Practical 
work in mineralogy, physiography, and stratigraphy is required during the course. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. McLean 

36. Historical Geology. (3 hrs.) 

The history of the earth as revealed by its strata. Laboratory and field study of the common 
fossils and local formations. 

Mr. Weimer 



Bethany College Bulletin 67 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

W. K. Woolery, Head of the Department 
Chandler Shaw, Associate Professor 

Aims: 

Courses in history are to acquaint the student with the record of mankind and the 
forces which have created that record; to develop a critical faculty of interpreting the 
past; to encourage an attitude of thought and concern on the present problems of peace 
and public welfare; to offer training for those who wish to teach history. The courses in 
political science are intended to provide training for professional careers in public 
service and in teaching the social studies. 

Requirement for Major: 

Students majoring in History should elect not less than twelve semester hours in Euro- 
pean history, twelve semester hours in American history, and six hours in political 
science. Not less than eighteen hours must be taken in the upper division, and it is 
recommended that twelve hours be taken in each of the junior and senior years. 

Requirement for Minor: 

The minimum requirement for a minor in history is eighteen hours in the department 
with not less than six hours of upper division work. Six hours of the minor may be in 
political science. 

A minimum of eighteen hours is required for a minor in political science. History 
41-42 may be made a part of the eighteen hours. All courses in political science apply 
on the history major but do not alter the minimum requirement for that major. 

Social Science 
21-22. Introduction to the Social Studies. (3 hrs.) 

A general survey of the social sciences for freshmen, devoted to the study of human institu- 
tions and their current problems. 

Mr. Woolery and Mr. Shaw 

European History 
11-12. History of Western Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the political and economic systems, literature, philosophy, religion, art, archi- 
tecture, and daily life from the ancient Greeks to the nineteenth century. The course is 
intended as a foundation for the social sciences, English and foreign literatures, religion, 
and the arts. 

Mr. Shaw 
35. Survey of European History. (3 hrs.) 

The development of European civilization from the dying Roman Empire to the seven- 
teenth century. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Shaw 



68 Bethany College Bulletin 

37. Early European History. (3 hrs.) 

The history and culture of Europe from the late Middle Ages to 1648. Not offered in 1946- 
1947. 

Mr. Shaw 
51-52. Modern European History. (3 hrs.) 

The political and social development of Europe. Includes the development of science, in- 
dustry, and modern thought. 

Mr. Shaw 
65. Ancient Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

Deals with the development of Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Aegean, Greece, and Italy. 

Mr. Shaw 
70. The History of England. (3 hrs.) 

A history of English institutions and the English people from the ninth to the early 
twentieth centuries. 

Mr. Shaw 
75-76. Contemporary World History. (3 hrs.) 

The outstanding international events since 1931 — the background and causes of the Second 
World War, the diplomacy of the war, and the problems of the United Nations, the peace, 
and the post-war period. 

Mr. Shaw 
91. Seminar in European History, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Special topics for independent study by advanced students majoring in history. 

Mr. Shaw 

American History 
41-42. American History. (3 hrs.) 

Political and social history of the American people from colonial settlements to the present 
time. 

Mr. Woolery 

61. The Revolutionary Era. (3 hrs.) 

Constitutional history of the American nation from 1775 to 1825. Attention to personalities 
as well as to political constructions, in the formative period of the United States. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Woolery 

62. The Middle Period. (3 hrs.) 

Social and economic history of the United States from 1830 to i860. A study of the de- 
veloping sections. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Woolery 



Bethany College Bulletin 69 

63. Hispanic America and the United States. (3 hrs.) 

The peoples of Central and South America, their culture and political growth and relations 
with the United States. Emphasis on geographic factors and on resources as well as on 
nationalism. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. Woolery 

64. Diplomatic History of the United States. (3 hrs.) 

The international relations of the United States, with emphasis on the present period. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Woolery 

67. Recent America. (3 hrs.) 

National development and international relations since 1865. 

Mr. Woolery 

68. The Social Record. (3 hrs.) 

Expression of American opinion and types of action, 1800 to 1935. 

Mr. Woolery 
85. Materials and Methods of Teaching History. (3 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

92. Seminar in American History. (2 hrs.) 

A unifying course for advanced students majoring in history. 

Mr. Woolery 

Political Science 

57. Political Parties. (3 hrs.) 

The nature and effect of political ideas, the workings of parties, and the questions of political 
organizations and functions. 

Mr. Woolery 

58. Public Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Concepts and methods in the application of rules of public policy to problems of national, 
state, and municipal administration. 

Mr. Woolery 

59. American Government. (3 hrs.) 

Structure, functions, and problems of the national government. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Woolery 
72. Constitutional Law. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of the constitutional law of the United States as established in decisions of the 
federal courts. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Woolery 



70 Bethany College Bulletin 

73. Comparative Government. (3 hrs.) 

Government and politics of major European powers and Japan. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. Woolery 
80. History of Political Theory. (3 hrs.) 

History and analysis of the principal political theories from Plato to the end of the nine- 
teenth century. 

Mr. Woolery 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

21. Introduction to Librarianship. (3 hrs.) 

A general introductory course planned to give an overview of the field of librarianship, to 
study library development and to suggest opportunities for service which the library pro- 
fession offers. 

Mr. Behymer 
52. Library Techniques. (3 hrs.) 

A laboratory course planned to familiarize the prospective library school student with the 
kind of work and the type of problems undertaken in the professional library schools. 
Library organization and routines will be studied. Prerequisite, Library Science 21. 

Mr. Behymer 



MATHEMATICS 

J. S. V. Allen, Acting Head of the Department 
Bradford Tye, Assistant Professor 
Aims: 

The courses in Mathematics are designed to give the prospective teacher an under- 
standing and appreciation of the fundamental ideas of elementary mathematics; to 
provide the general student with a knowledge of the mathematical foundation of our 
civilization; to provide a tool for the technical student; to give the prospective gradu- 
ate student a foundation for later study and research. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in mathematics, including Mathematics 31-32, and 
at least twelve upper division hours. The upper division courses should include 
Mathematics 53-54. Students interested in science and engineering should elect Mathe- 
matics 71. Students interested in mathematics as a teaching subject should elect 



Bethany College Bulletin 71 

Mathematics 55-56. Two courses in the department should be taken in the senior 

year. 

Requirement for Minor: 

A minimum of eighteen hours in mathematics including Mathematics 31-32 and six 
hours in upper division courses. 

11. Mathematical Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

Plane trigonometry, logarithms, the slide rule, linear equations, determinants, and the 
analytical geometry of the straight line. Prerequisite, satisfactory standing in mathe- 
matics placement test for freshmen. 

Students ranking low in the placement test for freshmen will be required to attend a special 
laboratory section. 

Mr. Allen and Mr. Tye 

12. Mathematical Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

Quadratic equations, the factor theorem, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, 
permutations and combinations, the analytical geometry of second degree curves, applica- 
tions of analytical methods, and an introduction to the derivative. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 11 or three units of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, and high 
standing in placement test for freshmen. 

Mr. Allen and Mr. Tye 
21. Engineering Drawing. (3 hrs.) 

Principles of engineering drawing, straight and curve line construction, projection, perspec- 
tive, and isometric drawing. 

Mr. Allen and Assistant 
23. Plane Surveying. (3 hrs.) 

Care and use of surveying instrument, field problems, and computation and mapping. 
One hour class work and four hours field work each week. 

Mr. Tye 

31-32. Differential and Integral Calculus. (3 hrs.) 

A standard course. Technique of differentiation and integration with applications and an 
introduction to infinite series. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12. A continuous course. 

Mr. Tye 

37. Mathematics of Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

Frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, dispersion, correlation, regression 
equations, and the theory of probability. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12. Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Tye 

38. Mathematics of Finance and Investment. (3 hrs.) 

The operation of interest in annuities, amortization of debts and sinking funds, valuation 



72 Bethany College Bulletin 

of bonds, the experience table, and calculation of premiums for life insurance. Recom- 
mended for students majoring in Economics. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11-12. 

Mr. Tye 

53-54. Advanced Calculus. (3 hrs.) 

Theory of the derivative and the integral, partial differentiation and its applications, 
Green's and Stokes' theorems, power series, and Fourier series. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
31-32. 

Mr. Tye 
^. Introduction to Higher Algebra. (3 hrs.) 

Theory of equations, solution of cubic, quartic, and numerical equations, complex numbers, 
and an introduction to the fundamental concepts of algebra, class, group, field, number. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Tye 

56. Introduction to Modern Geometry. (3 hrs.) 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, an introduction to synthetic projective geometry, 
the concept of limit and infinity, geometrical constructions, recent developments and 
theorems. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Tye 
59. Advanced Analytical Geometry. (3 hrs.) 

Advanced methods and problems of analytic geometry of two and three dimensions, in- 
cluding loci, the general equation of the second degree, Euclidean transformations, poles 
and polars, quadric surfaces, determinants. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32. 

Mr. Tye 

71-72. Differential Equations. (2 hrs.) 

Methods of solution of ordinary differential equations and their applications to the physical 
sciences. Prerequisite, Mathematics 31-32. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Tye 

81-82. Mathematics Seminar, (i hr.) 

Special reports prepared and presented by the student under supervision. Required of all 
major students in the senior year. 

Mr. Tye 
85. Teaching of Mathematics. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Advanced work and independent study. Open to seniors of unusual ability who have com- 
pleted eighteen hours in the department. A reading knowledge of French and German will 
be found desirable. 

Mr. Tye 



Bethany College Bulletin 73 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

Pearl Mahaffey, Professor 

Earl D. McKenzie, Acting Head of the Department 

Margaret R. Woods, Instructor 

Aims : 

The aims of this department are to introduce students to the language, literature, and 
culture of France, Germany, and the Spanish speaking countries; to provide training 
in reading facility for students who are interested in scientific or historical study re- 
quiring the language as a "tool subject"; and to give adequate training in language, 
literature, and expression to students who are preparing to be teachers, translators, or 
representatives in foreign service. 

Requirement for a Major in French: 

Twenty-four hours in French, not including French 11-12, with eighteen hours in the 
upper division courses. Students expecting to teach French must complete French 85. 
History 51-52 are recommended. 

Requirement for a Minor in French, German, or Spanish: 

At least eighteen hours in the same language: 

French 
11-12. First Year French. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, and composition. Emphasis on reading. Two 
hours per week spent in oral training, in addition to work for credit. For students who have 
no acquaintance with the language. 

Miss Mahaffey and Assistant 
31-32. Intermediate French. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar review, composition, dictation, intensive and extensive reading. Emphasis on 
reading. Prerequisite, French 11-12, or a satisfactory standing in an achievement test. 

Miss Mahaffey and Assistant 

Note: Students who have studied French before entering college will be given a placement 
test at the beginning of the college year. Those showing required proficiency will be en- 
rolled in French 31-32; those of superior attainments may enter a course in literature with 
permission of the head of the department. 

51-52. Conversation and Composition. (2 hrs.) 

A study of prose composition, syntax, and phonetics. Dictation, conversation, recordings. 
Prerequisite, French 31-32 or permission of the instructor. 

Miss Mahaffey and Assistant 



74 Bethany College Bulletin 

55-56. Modern Drama. (3 hrs.) 

French drama since the seventeenth century. Prerequisite, a reading knowledge of French. 
Conducted in French. 

Miss Mahaffey 
61-62. Novel. (3 hrs.) 

The French novel from its beginning to the twentieth century. Prerequisite, a reading 
knowledge of French. Conducted in French. 

Miss Mahaffey 
65-66. History of French Literature. (3 hrs.) 

Survey of French literature from the early periods to the present time. French readings 
from an anthology, lectures, library work, term papers. A general course for all students. 
Prerequisite, a reading knowledge of French. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Miss Mahaffey 

71. Seventeenth Century Drama. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the plays of Corneille, Racine, and Moliere, as representatives of the Classical 
spirit in France. Conducted in French. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. McKenzie 

72. Nineteenth Century Poetry. (3 hrs.) 

Study of schools of poetry, Romanticism, Parnassian, Symbolism. Conducted in French. 
Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. McKenzie 
82. Seminar for Major Students. (2 hrs.) 

Intensive study of French civilization and culture. Geography, history, government, educa- 
tion, science, press, art and music of France. Readings in French. 

Miss Mahaffey 
85. Teaching of Modern Languages. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

91 or 92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Independent study for advanced students. Study to be in field of French literature or 
linguistics. Open only to superior students majoring in French. 

Miss Mahaffey and Members of Department 

German 
11-12. First Year German. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, reading, and composition. Two hours per week 
spent in oral training, in addition to work for credit. For students who have no acquaintance 
with the language. 

Mr. McKenzie 



Bethany College Bulletin 75 

31-32. Intermediate German. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar review, composition, dictation, intensive and extensive reading. Special emphasis 
on outside reading in student's major or minor field. Prerequisite, German 11-12 or satis- 
factory standing in achievement test. 

Mr. McKenzie 

51-52. Conversation and Composition. (2 hrs.) 

Practical conversation, study of syntax, prose composition, and dictation. Admission by 
approval of instructor. 

Mr. McKenzie 

57-58. Nineteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Reading and critical study of the nineteenth century, especially Kleist, Hebbel, Heine, 
Keller, and others. Special emphasis on the drama and the Romantic school. Outside read- 
ings and class reports. Prerequisite, a reading knowledge of German. Conducted in German. 

Mr. McKenzie 

67-68. ElGTHEENTH CENTURY. (3 hrs.) 

Readings of the works of Lessing, Goethe and Schiller with outside readings and class re- 
ports. Prerequisite, a reading knowledge of German. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. McKenzie 
91-92. Problems in German Literature. (3 hrs.) 

Studies of selected areas in the field of German literature and science. Not offered in 1946- 
1947. 

Mr. McKenzie 

Spanish 
11-12. First Year Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, reading, and composition. Two hours per week 
spent in oral training in addition to work for credit. For students who have no acquaintance 
with the language. 

Miss Woods 
31-32. Intermediate Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Grammar, oral work and reading. Practice in dictation, writing, and speaking. Reading of 
modern prose and plays. Prerequisite, Spanish 11-12 or satisfactory standing in achieve- 
ment test. 

Miss Woods 
51. Conversation. (3 hrs.) 

Conversation, dictation, recordings, and composition. Prerequisite, Spanish 31-32 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Miss Woods 



y6 Bethany College Bulletin 

52. Commercial Spanish. (3 hrs.) 

Study of business and commercial Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 31-32 or permission of 
the instructor. 

Miss Woods 
61-62. Survey of Spanish Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A general survey of Spanish and Spanish-American literature. Literary master-pieces by 
representative authors of the classical period, the nineteenth century, and contemporary 
literature. Lectures, reading of representative works, and reports. Required for a minor in 
Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 31-32 or permission of the instructor. 

Miss Woods 



MUSIC 

Richard C. von Ende, Head of the Department 
George Hauptfuehrer, Instructor 
Ralph B. Holter, Instructor 
Aims: 

The department aims to provide opportunity for students to develop an understanding 
and appreciation of music as a part of general education; to provide well-balanced and 
complete four-year courses for students who major in music with the followi g options: 
(1) courses leading to professional performance, (2) courses leading to private teaching, 
(3) courses leading to public school teaching and supervision. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four hours in the department, including eighteen upper division hours. 
The major may be earned in courses leading to professional performance or private 
teaching or in courses leading to public school teaching and supervision. The sequence 
of courses must be approved by the head of the department. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen hours in the department, with a sequence of courses to be approved 
by the head of the department. 

Literature and Theory of Music 
11-12. Ear Training and Sight Singing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of tonal relationships, simple rhythms, melodies in both major and minor modes, 
simple melodic forms and harmonic progressions. 

Mr. Holter 
31. Music Appreciation I. (3 hrs.) 

A survey course designed for the layman to give him an overview of the field of music, lead- 



Bethany College Bulletin 77 

ing to an appreciation and enjoyment of the world's great music. A general course requiring 
no technical background. 

Mr. Holter 
32. Music Appreciation II. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the styles and periods of music as exemplified by great composers. Prerequisite, 
Music 31. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
35-36. Harmony I and II. (3 hrs.) 

A study of major and minor scales, all intervals, triads, and chords of the seventh and their 
inversions in four-part writing, simple modulations, melody writing, and the elements of 
form. 

Mr. Holter 
51-52. Music History. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the historical significance of the main periods and types of music. A technical 
course primarily for those looking toward a major or minor in music, or for those with suf- 
ficient musical background. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer or Mr. Holter 

55. Harmony III. (3 hrs.) 

Part-writing, using chromatic harmony, modulation, chords up to the thirteenth; the ele- 
ments of keyboard harmony; some original writing. Prerequisite, Music 35-36. 

Mr. von Ende 

56. Counterpoint. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles of contrapuntal harmonization in two, three, and four parts, and 
the practical application of counterpoint in the form of invention. Prerequisite, Music $$. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
61-62. Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training. (2 hrs.) 

An advanced study of tonal relationships, including chromatics, syncopated and difficult 
rhythms, recognition of harmonic progressions, including simple modulations. Prerequisite, 
Music 11-12. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 

65. Form and Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the structural designs upon which music is based, including polyphonic, classic, 
romantic, and modern periods. Prerequisite, Music 55. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. von Ende 

66. Orchestration. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the beginning principles of instrumentation and orchestration, including a 
thorough understanding of transposing instruments, and the problems of writing for such 
groups of instruments as are most commonly found in the average school or community 
orchestra. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 



78 Bethany College Bulletin 

75-76. Conducting. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the technique of the baton, and the different problems to be met in conducting 
chorus, orchestra, and band; the introduction to score reading; and an opportunity for 
practical experience through the conducting of the college choral and instrumental groups. 
Offered only to advanced students. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. von Ende 
83. Instrumental Technique in the Public Schools. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching instrumental music in the 
public schools. Ability to play simple music on at least one representative instrument 
of each choir of the orchestra. 

Mr. Holter 

85. The Teaching of Music in the Elementary Schools. 
(3 h^.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching music in the grades. 

Mr. von Ende 

86. The Teaching of Music in the Secondary Schools. 
(3 hrs.) 

A study of the principles, problems, and materials for teaching music in junior and senior 
high schools. 

Mr. von Ende 
91-92. Problems, (i hr.) 

An advanced course for major students of music, which may include methods of piano 
teaching, composition, or other problems to prepare the individual for his particular in- 
terests in music. 

Mr. von Ende or Mr. Hauptfuehrer 

Applied Music 
150-160. Band, (i hr.) 

Study and performance of standard band repertoire. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
15C-16C. Choir, (i hr.) 

A study of choral literature and rendition of cantatas, oratories, and selected numbers of 
recognized merit. 

Mr. von Ende 
I5g-i6g. Girls' Chorus, (i hr.) 

The study and performance of choral literature for female voices. 

Mr. von Ende 



Bethany College Bulletin 79 

150-160. Orchestra, (i hr.) 

Orchestral instruments in their various combinations; study and rendition of concert 
repertoire. 

Mr. Holter 
210-220. Organ, (i hr.) 

Technique, theory, and literature of the organ. Open to all students who have had some 
training in either piano or organ. Private lessons. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
2ip-22p. Piano, (i hr.) 

Technique, theory, and literature of the piano. Private lessons. 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
2is-22s. Strings, (i hr.) 

Private lessons in violin, viola, cello, or bass. 

Mr. Holter 
2iv-22v. Voice, (i hr.) 

Vocal technique, theory, and literature. Open to all students who have adequate native 
ability, with or without previous vocal training. Private lessons. 

Mr. von Ende 

Note: Applied music courses may be repeated for full credit. Only twelve hours of aca- 
demic work in Applied Music can be applied toward meeting the minimum requirements 
for the baccalaureate degree. 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 

Aims : 

To give professional insight and understanding to students interested in the field of 
personnel administraticn and labor relations as a career and for those who want some 
background in this field as a part of their general education. 

49. Practicum in Personnel Administration. (2 hrs.) 

On-the-job experience in some phase of personnel administration following a well-planned 
program. Must be taken in summer vacation or in semester when student is not in resi- 
dence. Open only with permission of instructor. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
67. Labor Problems. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the position of the wage earner in modern industrial society. Organizational 
policies, structural evolution, methods, and objectives of organized labor. Problems related 



80 Bethany College Bulletin 

to income, quest for security, social and economic objectives. Prerequisite, Economics 
43~44- 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 

68. Industrial Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 68. 

69. Labor Legislation. (3 hrs.) 

Study of permissible ambit of collective bargaining; regulatory and protective legislation 
affecting labor. Legislative and judicial appreciation of the economic, social, and political 
problems involved. Prerequisite, Economics 43-44. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 

70. Personnel Administration. (3 hrs.) 

Procedures, activities, and evaluation of personnel administration in business and industry. 
Selection and placement; job analysis and evaluation; training and promotion; job satis- 
faction; wage theory and procedures; manpower utilization; records and controls. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
96. Seminar in Personnel Administration. (2 hrs.) 

Independent study and conference reports on significant projects in specific areas of person- 
nel administration, i.e., industrial, retail, governmental, etc. Specialized study of tech- 
niques, policies, trends, and current issues. Open only to students who have professional 
interest and competence. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 



PHILOSOPHY 

Aims: 

Philosophy aims at a study of the problems of life, especially the more persistent prob- 
lems of reality, knowledge, morality, religion, and social life, that the student may de- 
velop habits of thinking clearly and thinking complete thoughts which integrate his 
knowledge from different fields into a unified whole. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours in this field. 

53-54. History of Philosophy. (3 hrs.) 

A rapid survey of western philosophical thought from the seventh century B. C. to modern 
times. The first semester will be devoted to a study of ancient and medieval philosophies. 
The second semester will begin with the Renaissance. 

Mr. Stevenson 



Bethany College Bulletin 8i 

$$. Reflective Thinking. (3 hrs.) 

An analysis of deductive and inductive reasoning; practice in the detection of logical 
fallacies. 

Mr. Stevenson 
$6. Ethics. (3 hrs.) 

The theory of the moral life as developed in the history of western thought and applied to 
personal and social problems. 

Mr. Stevenson 

57. Contemporary Philosophy. (3 hrs.) 

A study of western philosophical thought since 1900. Prerequisite, Philosophy 53-54. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Stevenson 

58. Philosophy of Religion. (3 hrs.) 

Investigation of the life situation out of which religion rises for the individual and for 
society; a study of religion in belief and in practice. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Stevenson 
61-62. Plato. (3 hrs.) 

A critical study of the philosophy of Plato and its influence on ancient and modern thought 
and culture. Prerequisite, Philosophy 53-54. 

Mr. Ice 

62* Problems of Philosophy. (2 hrs.) 

Five or six of the major problems of knowledge and existence will be investigated in the 
writings of great philosophers ranging from Plato to modern times. A seminar course. Pre- 
requisite, Philosophy 53-54. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Ice 
64. Contemporary Trends in Religious Thinking. (2 hrs.) 

An introduction to current movements of life and thought in contemporary religious world. 
Inter-faith relations and the ecumenical movement will be studied along with certain 
developments in theology. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Ice 



82 Bethany College Bulletin 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH 

J. J. Knight, Head of the Department 

S. Elizabeth Reed, Instructor 

, Instructor 

Aims: 

It is the aim of the department to promote the health education and physical de- 
velopment of the student; to provide opportunities for students to participate in and 
secure a reasonable degree of proficiency in physical recreation activities; and to train 
physical education and play leaders for educational, industrial, and community 
situations. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of thirty hours which should include the following courses: Physical Edu- 
cation 15 or 16, 37, 67, 77, and 85. Sociology 31, Psychology 57, and Education 31-32 
are recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

A minimum of twenty hours in the department with the sequence of courses approved 
by the head of the department. 

Requirement for all Students: 

Freshmen: Physical Education 11-12 is required. Physical Education 15 or 16 may 
be elected in the freshman year. 

Sophomores: Physical Education 35-36 is required of all students, but permission 
may be granted to substitute equivalent hours from Physical Education 31-32,41-42, 
37, 38, 43, 44, 51-52, or work in varsity athletics. Physical Education 15 or 16 is to be 
taken before the end of the sophomore year. 

A season's work in varsity athletics, i.e., football, basketball, track, baseball, and 
tennis is credited with one hour of physical education provided proper course registra- 
tion is made. Only two physical education hours may be obtained through varsity 
athletics. 

All students are required to present six hours of credit in physical education for 
graduation which must include Physical Education II, 12, and 3S y 36 or approved 
substitute courses. Not more than a total of four hours credit toward graduation will 
be allowed from courses 11, 12, 35, 36, and varsity athletics. 

All students will be required to pass a swimming achievement test prior to graduation. 
Students who are physically unfit as certified by the college physician may petition to 
be allowed to substitute hours in other courses in lieu of activity courses in physical 
education. Students who are not candidates for a degree may be exempt from the 
requirement in physical education. Any petition for exemption from physical education 
should be addressed to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. 

11-12. Freshman Physical Education, (i hr.) 

Instruction in the techniques and rules of a wide variety of team sports. Required of all 
freshmen. An activity course. Three periods per week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 



Bethany College Bulletin 83 

15 or 16. Personal Hygiene. (2 hrs.) 

Fundamental knowledge of personal hygiene and how the health of the individual may be 
conserved. Students who have successfully passed the course in Biology n, or who have 
demonstrated on a comprehensive^test that they possess a satisfactory knowledge of health 
rules and practices, may be permitted to substitute two hours of academic work for this 
requirement. 

Miss Murphy 
31-32. Tap and Character Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practical course starting out with elementary tap steps and combinations working up to 
finished routines and dances. Open to men and women. An activity course. Two periods 
per week. 

Miss Reed 
34. Camping and Outdoors, (i hr.) 

See Biology 34. 

35-36. Sophomore Physical Education, (i hr.) 

A practical course dealing with individual sports. For sophomores who desire to elect a 
general recreation course. An activity course. Three periods per week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

37. Elementary Swimming, (i hr.) 

Instruction for beginners in buoyancy and floating. Preliminary tests for swimming, and 
such strokes as elementary back, side, and crawl. An activity course. Three periods per 
week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

38. Advanced Swimming, (i hr.) 

Instruction in correct form of the more advanced strokes as the trudgen, American crawl, 
racing back, and breast. Diving and life-saving. Prerequisite, Physical Education 37 or 
equivalent. An activity course. Three periods per week. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 
41-42. Folk Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practice course in folk dancing from many countries. English and American country 
dances are studied during the first semester and European folk dances during the second 
semester. Open to men and women. An activity course. Two periods per week. 

Miss Reed 
43. Tumbling and Stunts, (i hr.) 

Practice course beginning with individual stunts and advancing to more intricate work. 
An activity course. Two periods per week. 

Mr. Knight 



84 Bethany College Bulletin 

44. Gymnastics and Apparatus, (i hr.) 

A survey course of various gymnastic systems and practice in apparatus. An activity 
course. Two periods per week. 

Mr. Knight 
46. Community Hygiene. (2 hrs.) 

A study of health matters pertaining to the rocial group. 

Miss Reed 
47-48. Theory and Practice of Team Sports, (i hr.) 

Intensive practice with opportunity for officiating in team sports for men and women. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 
50. Social Dancing, (i hr.) 

Instruction in the modern social dance steps. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 
51-52. Modern Dancing, (i hr.) 

A practical course in contemporary dancing, emphasizing the use of the fundamental 
expressive movements in creative work. An activity course. Two periods per week. 

Miss Reed 
$3. Coaching Football. (2 hrs.) 

A study of fundamentals, offensive and defensive styles of play, conditioning players, rules 
of the game, and officiating. 

Mr. Knight 
54. Coaching Basketball. (2 hrs.) 

A study of fundamentals, offensive and defensive types of play, rules, and officiating. The 
place of basketball in the intramural program. 

Mr. Knight 
$6. Baseball, Track, and Field. (2 hrs.) 

A study of the strategy and fundamentals of baseball, track, and field. 

Mr. Knight 

57. Playground Management. (3 hrs.) 

Instruction in playground management, group games, relays, stunts, and rhythmic activi- 
ties for elementary children. Two hours of theory and one hour of practical work. 

Miss Reed 

58. Community Recreation. (2 hrs.) 

Leisure and its meaning, education for leisure, effect of leisure on personality, recreation, 
and social maladjustment, recreational movements and activities in the United States and 
in foreign countries. 

Miss Reed 



Bethany College Bulletin 85 

59. Prevention and Care of Injuries. (2 hrs.) 

Common hazards of play and athletics with a study of preventive measures and treatment 
of injuries. Red Cross First Aid Certificate may be earned by those who pass the examina- 
tion. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Miss Reed 
67. Physiology. (3 hrs.) 

See Biology 67. 

70. Kinesiology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of fundamental bodily movements and their relation to bodily development and 
efficiency. Prerequisite, Biology 36 and Biology 67. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Knight 
72. Corrective Gymnastics and Normal Diagnosis. (2 hrs.) 

A study of variations of the normal types of the human organism, at different age levels. 
Therapeutic measures will be evaluated, especially those which refer to the correction of 
mechanical defects. Prerequisite, Biology 36 and Biology 67. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

74. Organization and Administration of Physical Educa- 
tion. (3 hrs.) 

This course deals with administrative relationships and procedures in the conduct of physi- 
cal education. 

Mr. Knight 

76. Theory and Practice of Individual Sports. (2 hrs.) 

Intensive practice in badminton, handball, archery, tennis, and golf. A study of the rules of 
each and of methods used in teaching .Open to men and women. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 

77. History and Principles of Physical Education. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the development of physical education from ancient times to the present. A 
study of the principles underlying physical education and its educational content. 

Mr. Knight 
85. Methods of Health and Physical Education. (3 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

For advanced students of unusual ability in physical education who can undertake special 
problems for study or who are prepared to develop and project a program. 

Mr. Knight and Miss Reed 



86 Bethany College Bulletin 

PHYSICS 

J. S. V. Allen, Head of the Department 
Aims 

The courses in physics are planned to present a survey of the field of physics to the 
general student; to teach the fundamentals of the science of physics to students who are 
training themselves for such professions as medicine, optometry, engineering, and the 
teaching of physics; and to familiarize the students expecting to enter graduate school 
with some of the more advanced materials in physics. The scientific method is stressed 
both in its past applications in solving important problems in physics and for its 
future use by the student in solving new problems. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours is required. Students interested in science and engi- 
neering should elect Physics 52. Physics 91-92 and a reading knowledge of German and 
French are recommended for students expecting to do graduate work. A minor in 
mathematics or chemistry is recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

A minimum of eighteen hours is required. Mathematics 1 1-12 and Mathematics 31-32 
should be elected. 

21. Elements of Radio. (3 hrs.) 

A beginning course in radio theory and practice. The laboratory work includes the con- 
struction of oscillators, amplifiers, and receivers. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. Allen 

31. General Physics. (4 hrs.) 

An elementary treatment of mechanics, sound and heat. This course, together with Physics 

32, comprises the fundamental course in physics which is a prerequisite to all advanced 
physics courses. Prerequisite, Mathematics n or its equivalent. 

Mr. Allen 
32. General Physics. (4 hrs.) 

An elementary treatment of magnetism, electricity and light. This is a continuation of 
Physics 31. Prerequisite, Physics, 31. 

Mr. Allen 
35. Basic Electronics. (3 hrs.) 

A fundamental course in electronics, including such topics as electron emission, rectifiers, 
multi-electrode vacuum tubes, photoelectric devices and the cathode-ray oscillograph. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Allen 
52. Mechanics. (3 hrs.) 

An advanced course in physics, including a treatment of classical mechanics with applica- 
tion of principles; and a brief consideration of wave mechanics. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Allen 



Bethany College Bulletin 87 

53. Advanced Light and Physical Optics. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

Theories of light, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, polarization, geometrical 
optics, optical instruments, vision, and spectroscopy. Four hours credit is possible if the 
laboratory work is also elected. Prerequisite, Physics 31-32 and Mathematics 31-32. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Allen 
55-56. Laboratory in Advanced Physics, (i hr.) 

Supplementary to any of the upper division physics courses. The student should consult the 
instructor in charge before registering in the course. 

Mr. Allen 

63. Electricity and Magnetism. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

An advanced treatment of electrostatics and magnetics, electrochemistry, circuit theory, 
and electrical machinery. A consideration of the theoretical and practical applications of 
electricity and magnetism. Four hours credit is possible if the laboratory work is also 
elected. Prerequisite, Physics 31-32 and Mathematics 31-32. 

Mr. Allen 

64. Heat. (3 or 4 hrs.) 

An advanced study of temperature, calorimetry, expansion, conductivity, change of state 
and radiation. Some consideration will be given thermodynamics and kinetic theory. Four 
hours credit is possible if the laboratory work is also elected. Prerequisite, Physics 31-32 
and Mathematics 31-32. 

Mr. Allen 

65. Radio and Television. (3 hrs.) 

A more advanced course in the theory of radio, carrier-current communication, radar, and 
television. Prerequisite, Physics 21 and Physics 32. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. Allen 
67-68. Spectroscopic Analysis, (i hr.) 

A laboratory course employing an E-i Hilger Spectrograph and auxiliary equipment for 
analytical work. Much of the work in this course consists of original research and publica- 
tion of the results. Admission by permission of the instructor. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Allen 
75. Electronics. (3 hrs). 

A more advanced course in electronics, concerned with thyratrons, ignitrons, converters, 
inverters, and industrial control circuits. Prerequisite, Physics 35. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Allen 
85. Teaching of Physics. (2 hrs.) 

See Education 85. 



88 Bethany College Bulletin 

91-92. Problems, (i or 1 hrs.) 

Readings, experiments, and investigations in radioactivity, spectroscopy, radio and 
electronics, or in the field of the student's interest. Open to juniors and seniors of superior 
ability and accomplishment who are majoring or minoring in the department. 

Mr. Allen 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Andrew Leitch, Head of the Department 
Aims : 

Psychology is intended to acquaint the student with the facts and laws of behavior, 
especially human behavior — physical and mental, normal and abnormal — and with 
the experimental and scientific approach to problems in this field. The courses offered 
are designed to enable the student to develop a wholesome personality and to make 
adequate social adjustments; to give background preparation for professions which 
relate to individual and group behavior; to equip the student in an elementary way for 
practical work in mental measurements, personnel analysis, and applied fields; and to 
lay a broad foundation for graduate work and professional study. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four hours in the department, which must include Psychology 31-32, 
$3, 61, 62 or 64, and 75. A major should include Biology 11-12. Biology 43, Sociology 
31, and Education 63 are recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen hours in the department, which must include Psychology 31-32, S3 y 
61 or 64. 

31-32. General Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

An introductory course providing a systematic study of the most important facts and laws 
of behavior and mental life. Emphasis on their practical significance in the professions, 
business, industry, and personal life. Laboratory demonstrations. 

Mr. Leitch 
43. Introduction to Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A briefer course similar in content and method to Psychology 31-32. Credit not given for 
both Psychology 31-32 and Psychology 43. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Leitch 
S3. Experimental Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A laboratory course in which the student carries on a series of typical psychological experi- 
ments in sensory, motor, intellectual, and emotional processes. Prerequisite, Psychology 
31-32. 

Mr. Leitch and Assistant 



Bethany College Bulletin 89 

54. Applied Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A general course treating the application of psychological principles to problems in the fields 
of business, the professions, and personal life. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. Not offered in 
1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Leitch 
$6. Social Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A systematic study of the behavior of the individual in his social relationships, with special 
attention to the significance of motives and attitudes. Problems related to adequate and in- 
adequate social adjustments. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

57. Psychology of Personality. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the phenomena of personality with special attention to the psychology of adjust- 
ment — basic human drives, factors affecting personality formation in childhood and adoles- 
cence, adequate and inadequate personality adjustments, the development of a wholesome 
personality, mental hygiene. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

58. Abnormal Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A systematic study of mental deficiency, the neuroses, the psychoses (insanity), and ab- 
normal traits in everyday life. Study trips to special classes and institutions for mental 
cases. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

61. Educational Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the nature and laws of learning; original nature as conditioning learning; the 
amount, rate, limit, and permanence of improvement; factors and conditions affecting 
learning; transfer of training; mental fatigue; individual differences; efficient methods of 
study. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 

62. Measurement of Intelligence. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the more important techniques for the measurement of intelligence. The use of 
intelligence tests in education, and in out-of school agencies. Laboratory work with in- 
dividual and group tests. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Leitch 
64. Aptitude and Personality Testing. (3 hrs.) 

The techniques for measuring primary mental abilities, special aptitudes, interests, at- 
titudes, and personality. A laboratory course. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Leitch 
66. Child and Adolescent Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, moral, and religious development of 
the individual in infancy, childhood and adolescence, with especial attention to the more 



go Bethany College Bulletin 

serious mental problems of children and adolescents. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Leitch 
68. Industrial Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

General treatment of the applications of psychology to problems in the industrial world. 
Personnel selection, classification, accidents, fatigue, motivation, morale, and occupational 
adjustments. Prerequisite, Psychology 31-32. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick 
76. Contemporary Schools of Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

Historical development and evaluation of some of the more important trends and schools 
of contemporary psychology, such as the structural and functional schools, behaviorism, 
psychoanalysis, Gestalt, etc. Limited to juniors and seniors offering Psychology 31-32 as a 
prerequisite. 

Mr. Leitch 
91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A course for advanced students in which the student may either carry on some minor 
psychological experiment, review the literature related to some field of investigation in 
psychology, or study some major problem in psychological research. Limited to seniors. 
Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Leitch 



RELIGION 

Dwight E. Stevenson, Head of the Department 

Osborne Booth, Professor 

Irvin T. Green, Professor 

Harry L. Ice, Professor 

James B. Miller, Instructor 

Aims: 

(a) To provide for all students in the liberal arts a focus of religious meanings for inte- 
gration of knowledge and for the guidance of life. 

(b) To prepare students planning to enter the various branches of the Christian 
Ministry for graduate study in professional schools of religion. 

(c) To give enough professional training to enable a graduate of the college to enter 
immediately into Christian service as a minister or religious educator. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours, of which eighteen hours shall be in the upper division. For pre- 
ministerial students this must include Bible 31-32 and 33-34. 



Bethany College Bulletin 91 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours, of which twelve hours must be in the upper division. 

Requirement for Graduation: 

Six hours of work in the English Bible are required of all students qualifying for 
graduation. The following courses may be taken without prerequisites to satisfy this 
requirement: In the freshman year, Bible 1 1 or 12, 13 or 14. In the junior or senior year, 
Bible 71-72. 

The Bible 

11. Old Testament. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the major personalities and epochs of Old Testament history, and the literature 
and religion of the Hebrews in Biblical times. For the general student. To be followed by 
Bible 14, New Testament History. Not open to students in the upper division. Ministerial 
students should elect Bible 33-34, a full year in Old Testament, in place of this course. 

Mr. Stevenson 

12. Old Testament. (3 hrs.) 

The same as Bible n, to be taken in the second semester following Bible 13. 

Mr. Stevenson 

13. New Testament History. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the life and message of Jesus, the origin of the Christian Church, and the work 
of Paul. For the general student. To be followed by Bible 12, Old Testament. Not open to 
students in the upper division. Ministerial students should elect Bible 31-32, a full year in 
New Testament, in place of this course. 

Mr. Green 

14. New Testament History. (3 hrs.) 

The same as Bible 13, to be taken in the second semester following Bible 11. 

Mr. Green 
31-32. New Testament Survey. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of all books of the New Testament. The first semester will be devoted to the Four 
Gospels. 

Mr. Green 
33-34. Old Testament History. (3 hrs.) 

A history of the political and religious development of the Hebrew people to the time of the 
Maccabees. 

Mr. Booth 
55-56. The Prophets. (3 hrs.) 

The origin and development of prophecy among the Hebrews. Special attention to social 
and political backgrounds. 

Mr. Booth 



92 Bethany College Bulletin 

57-58. Comparative Religion. (3 hrs.) 

A comparison of the most important features of the great religions of antiquity, including 
religions of primitives, Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, Persia, Greece, Rome, Judaism, and 
Christianity. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Booth 
6$. The Teachings of Jesus. (3 hrs.) 

The teachings of Jesus in relation to the movements of his time, and to the Jewish and 
Greek backgrounds. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Green 

66. The Teachings of Paul. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the fundamental doctrines of the Epistles of Paul in the New Testament. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Green 

67. The Jewish Background. (3 hrs.) 

A careful study and evaluation will be made of the "Jewish Background" of the life and 
work of Jesus and Paul. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

Mr. Stevenson 

68. The Greek Background. (3 hrs.) 

A study will be made of the Social, Economic, Philosophical, and Religious background of 
the Gentile World. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Stevenson 
69-70. The Literature Between the Testaments. (3 hrs.) 

A study of Jewish literature produced between the Old and New Testaments. The Apo- 
crypha and Pseudepigrapha. 

Mr. Stevenson 
71-72. The Bible as Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the various types of literature in the Bible together with their composition and 
transmission. 

Mr. Booth 
83-84. Biblical Doctrine. (3 hrs.) 

An investigation of the various doctrines of the New Testament; studies in relation to 
later Christian thinking. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Green 
91-92. Problems. (2 hrs.) 

An investigation of special problems of Biblical scholarship. An advanced course for majors. 
Problems to be selected by the individual student on the basis of personal interest and 
faculty advice. 

Mr. Booth, Mr. Green, Mr. Stevenson 



Bethany College Bulletin 93 

Church History 
51-52. History and Literature of the Disciples. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the rise and development of the Restoration Movement, including an evalua- 
tion of the literature produced. 

Mr. Green 

69. The Ancient Church. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of church history from the beginning to the reign of Charlemagne. Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Green 

70. The Reformation. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of church history from Charlemagne to the close of the Reformation. Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Green 

HOMILETICS AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

59-60. Reading the English Bible, (i hr.) 

Reading the English Bible and learning to pronounce the words in the field of Biblical 
Literature. 

Mr. Green 
61-62. The Theory of Preaching. (3 hrs.) 

The preparation and delivery of sermons. 

63-64. The Work of the Pastor. (3 hrs.) 

The organization of the local church, including a study of financial methods, evangelism, 
worship, and social problems. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Green and others 

81. The Theory of Religious Education. (3 hrs.) 

A lecture and reading course to acquaint the student with the principles of religious educa- 
tion, factors involved in religious growth and development, functions of family, church, 
and state in religious education. 

Mr Miller 

82. The Educational Work of the Church. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the total educational program of the church, with special emphasis on the 
Church School. Alternates with Religious Education 86. 

Mr. Miller 



Mr. Green 



94 Bethany College Bulletin 

86. Special Projects in Religious Education. (3 hrs.) 

Emphasis on week-day religious education, public school courses in religion, the vacation 
Church School. Alternates with Religious Education 82. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Miller 



SOCIOLOGY 
E. C. Paustian, Head of the Department 



Aims: 



The curriculum in sociology is designed to give an understanding of human relation- 
ships, institutions, social processes; to familiarize students with the nature and 
causes of social problems; to equip the student with fundamental preparation for 
entering various kinds of social work; and to provide preparation for teaching sociology 
and for graduate or professional study. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours in the department, including Sociology 31-32, 6$, 73, and 83-84. 
Biology 11-12, Economics 47, Psychology 56 and Psychology 58 are recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours in an approved sequence of courses. Twelve hours must be in upper 
division courses. 

31. Introductory Sociology. (3 hrs.) 

The basic concepts and principles of sociology applied to modern society; social relations of 
the community; race and culture; social maladjustments; social change and control. 

Mr. Paustian 

32. Family Relationships. (3 hrs.) 

The development of marriage and family social functions; contemporary problems and 
tendencies of the family. 

Mr. Paustian 

43. Rural Sociology. (3 hrs.) 

Consideration of the rural pattern of life; the institutions, culture, and agencies function- 
ing in the country and village life of today. 

Mr. Paustian 

44. Urban Sociology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the rise and growth of cities; the social organization and problems of the modern 
city; urban trends, structure, and function. 

Mr. Paustian 



Bethany College Bulletin 95 

45. Social Service Practicum. (i to 4 hrs.) 

Student training and experience during the summer months on the staff of an approved 
social service agency. Only upper division students, by prior arrangement with the head of 
the department, can be given an opportunity to earn credits in this way. Intended primarily 
for students in Sociology major. 

Mr. Paustian 
47. Social Measurements. (3 hrs.) 

See Economics 47. 

51. Population Problems. (3 hrs.) 

History of population theories and policies; qualitative aspects of the population problem 
with reference to eugenics, migration, control of population. Prerequisite Sociology 31. Not 
offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Paustian 
$$. Criminology. (3 hrs.) 

Analysis of the social processes by which individuals become criminals and delinquents; 
causative factors, techniques of control, and the social treatment of crime. Prerequisite 
Sociology 31. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Paustian 
56. Social Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology $6. 

58. Abnormal Psychology. (3 hrs.) 

See Psychology 58. 

6$. Community Organization. (2 hrs.) 

Analysis of the social structure and functions of the modern community, social, economic, 
and political organization of urban and rural populations. 

Mr. Paustian 
68. Cultural Anthropology. (2 hrs.) 

A study of primitive people and their institutions in pre-historic and more recent times; 
to present a cultural perspective and appreciation. Prerequisite Sociology 31, Not offered 
in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Paustian 

71. Social Disorganization. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the major social lags leading to social breakdowns, unemployment, poverty, 
dependency, delinquency, disease, and crime. Prerequisite Sociology 31. 

Mr. Paustian 

72. Introduction to Social Case Work. (3 hrs.) 

The basic principles and methods of social casework and their application in the treatment 



g6 Bethany College Bulletin 

of individuals and families. Open to upper division students or by permission of the 
instructor. 

Mr. Paustian 
73. Social Theory. (3 hrs.) 

A summing up of the various systems, classic and modern, of explaining the social behavior 
of individuals and groups. The nature of social control, chief control devices, institutional 
pressures and disruptive factors. Open only to upper division students. 

Mr. Paustian 
78. Group Organization and Leadership. (2 hrs.) 

The organization and leadership of homogeneous groups; significance of social processes 
characterizing such groups on the achievement of socialization and in the treatment of 
pathological behavior. Open only to upper division students. 

Mr. Paustian 
80. Social Ethics. (2 hrs.) 

A study of applied ethics to the problems of adolescence, courtship, and marriage; of pro- 
duction and consumption, distribution and conservation of wealth; of world citizenship, 
democracy and Christianity. Open only to upper division students. Not offered in 1946- 
1947. 

Mr. Paustian 
83-84. Seminar in Sociology, (i hr.) 

An advanced course for major and minor students in the department. The course has three 
purposes: to interpret by summary and interpretation the preceding work in the depart- 
ment; to offer instruction in the techniques and methods of social research; to give each 
student an opportunity to develop his particular interest in cooperation with the other 
members of the seminar group. Not offered in 1 946-1 947. 

Mr. Paustian 
91. Problems Course, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A course designed for students of special ability and interest in the field of Sociology. Inde- 
pendent reading under the direction of the head of the department in a special sociological 
problem or project of research. Admission only by special arrangement with the head of 
the department. 

Mr. Paustian 



PART IV 

HISTORY AND RESOURCES 
GENERAL INFORMATION 
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



HISTORY AND RESOURCES 



HISTORY 



Buffalo Seminary, the forerunner of Bethany College, was in- 
augurated at Bethany, Virginia, in the year 1818 in the home of 
Alexander Campbell, commonly known as the Mansion. Here, for 
some years, Mr. Campbell offered educational advantages for the 
youth of the community as well as training for young men in the 
work of the Christian ministry. 

A charter was granted to the Trustees of Bethany College by 
the Legislature of Virginia on March 2, 1840, authorizing the es- 
tablishment of a "seminary of learning for the instruction of youth 
in the various branches of science and literature, the useful arts, 
agriculture, and the learned and foreign languages." 

The trustees of the college named Mr. Campbell as the first 
president and directed him to formulate a plan for instruction for 
the new institution. He had strong convictions that the spirit of 
the institution should be altogether non-sectarian; in the charter 
occurred the statement that "nothing herein contained shall be 
so construed as at any time to authorize the establishment of a 
theological professorship." He believed that the formation of 
moral character should be the chief goal in education and was 
equally convinced of the necessity for an undergirding of moral 
instruction. Accordingly the Bible was made a regular textbook in 
the college and continues as part of the curriculum and life of the 
institution. 

In October of 1841, the first session opened with over a hundred 
students in attendance. In addition to Mr. Campbell the first 
faculty included W. K. Pendleton, A. F. Ross, Charles Stewart, 
and Robert Richardson. They envisaged a college of great useful- 
ness for the training of thoughtful leadership in business and the 
professions as well as the church, and they set for the college a fine 
tradition of liberal scholarship and standards of excellence. 

Following the war between the states, Bethany gradually 
changed from a distinctly southern college and began to draw 
students from the north central states. Its curriculum was marked 
by unusual emphasis on the physical sciences and modern lan- 
guages. Upon the death of Alexander Campbell in 1866, the presi- 



ioo Bethany College Bulletin 

dency was entrusted to W. K. Pendleton, who had been associated 
with the college from its opening days. 

Under the administration of W. H. Woolery, the third president 
of the college, the college made significant progress both in number 
of students and in prestige. The ten years following his death saw 
the college facing many difficult problems in enrollment and 
finances. In the space of ten years, five presidents or chairmen of 
the faculty labored with the mounting difficulties — Archibald 
McLean, Hugh McDiarmid, B. C. Hagerman, J. M. Kersey, and 
J. C. Keith. 

The modern development of the college began in 1901 with the 
election of Thomas E. Cramblet as president. This was a great era 
of progress and expansion. At the death of President Cramblet in 
191 9, the administration of the college was undertaken by Cloyd 
Goodnight. A growth in the student body, the further increase in 
properties and endowment, and emphasis upon high standards and 
progressive educational procedures marked his tenure. 

After the sudden death of President Goodnight in October, 
1932, an Administrative Committee, under the chairmanship of 
Hon. W. S. Wilkin, of trustees and faculty members carried on for 
almost a year. In June, 1933, J. A. Serena was elected president, 
resigning after a tenure of one year. The present administration, 
inaugurated in December, 1934, has given fresh emphasis and 
decided advancement to curricular and library matters, faculty 
scholarship and security, and the improvement of all resources and 
facilities. 



LOCATION 

Bethany College is situated in the northern panhandle of West 
Virginia, seven miles southeast of Wellsburg on State Route 67, 
fifteen miles north of Wheeling on State Route 88, and forty-five 
miles southwest of Pittsburgh. The village in which the college is 
located is easily accessible by automobile. A map indicating auto- 
mobile route to Bethany is printed in the back of this bulletin. A 
bus line operates on regular schedule between Bethany and Wells- 
burg. In Wellsburg connection is made with local bus lines for 
Steubenville, Ohio, and Wheeling and various inter-state bus lines 
as well as with the Pennsylvania Railroad. Good railroad connec- 
tions are possible by way of the Pennsylvania Railroad from 



Bethany College Bulletin ioi 

Steubenville, Ohio and Wellsburg or by way of the Baltimore and 
Ohio from Wheeling. Bethany is eight miles from the Wheeling 
Ohio County Airport now under construction, 

The village of Bethany is situated in rugged hilly country at an 
elevation of approximately 1,000 feet above sea level. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Bethany College now has approximately 1,000 acres of land, 
with buildings and equipment valued at near two million dollars. 
The land includes the college campus, the college farms, and a 
number of acres set aside for recreational purposes. 

The College Campus — The college campus, consisting of 
about fifty acres, is located on a hilltop overlooking the Buffalo 
Creek. On these fifty acres are a variety of trees and shrubs at- 
tractively placed in a well-kept lawn. 

The Main College Building — The Main Building stands in 
the center of the attractive campus. It is an imposing structure of 
Gothic architecture and is well adapted to the purpose for which 
it is used. It contains about forty rooms, most of which are used as 
classrooms. Along the west side and running the entire length of 
the building is the Corridor, an open promenade three hundred 
feet in length. 

Commencement Hall — This building was reconstructed and 
dedicated in 1924. The original Commencement Hall was built in 
1872, and the Gothic lines of the original building have been kept. 
The auditorium seats approximately six hundred people and con- 
tains a pipe organ and facilities for motion pictures. Studios for 
music and speech, together with several practice rooms for music 
are located on the lower floor of this building. 

E. W. Oglebay Hall of Agriculture — This hall was donated 
to the college by the late Earl W. Oglebay, of the class of 1869. 
This building is used mainly for the teaching of the sciences. It 
contains chemical and biological lecture rooms, library, labora- 
tories, and supply rooms. The style of architecture is Tudor Gothic 
and harmonizes with the Main Building. 

Carnegie Library — This building was made possible by gifts of 
Andrew Carnegie in 1906. The building is constructed of brown 
pressed brick with berea sandstone trimmings. 

The Irvin Gymnasium — This building was donated by the 



102 Bethany College Bulletin 

Irvin family of Big Run, Pennsylvania, in 191 9. The building, 
being of Gothic architecture, is in harmony with the other college 
buildings. It is equipped with swimming pool 20X60 feet, shower 
baths, team rooms, and running track, in addition to the gym- 
nasium floor. 

Rine Recreation Field — As a memorial to the late Edwin M. 
Rine, friend and benefactor of the college, the Board of Trustees 
designated 80 acres of land directly west of the campus to be 
known as the Rine Field. Facilities are now being made available 
for football, baseball, track, cross country, soccer, rifle range and 
obstacle course. 

Nature Trail — Margaretta Parkinson bequeathed the Parkin- 
son Farm to the college in 1914. Under the terms of this bequest 
two tracts of virgin timber on this property, known as the Parkin- 
son Oaks and the Parkinson Woods, are to be preserved intact as a 
memorial to Thomas Parkinson and Margaret Parkinson, her 
grandparents and former owners of the farm. 

Percy B. Cochran Hall — Hon. M. M. Cochran, of the Class 
of 1875, donated this splendid dormitory for men in 1910 as a 
memorial to his son, Percy B. Cochran, of the Class of 1900. The 
building is four stories high and is built of white brick. It has 
recently been remodeled and put in excellent condition. There are 
student rooms for one hundred men. 

Phillips Hall — This dormitory for women was originally 
donated to the college by Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, Sr., of New 
Castle, Pennsylvania. In 1930 a splendid new dormitory was com- 
pleted to replace and include the original building. The new Phil- 
lips Hall of red brick and stone has been built along Gothic lines 
to harmonize with the other buildings of the college. There are 
student rooms for over a hundred women. In addition to the 
dormitory space the building provides a central dining room for 
all of the college women and for other important services of the 
college. 

Bethany House — A Dining Hall for Men — This new building 
provides dining facilities for the men of the college and an informal 
social center for the entire student body. As soon as practical, this 
building will be enlarged, with the present dining room becoming 
a student social center and a larger dining hall for men as the top 
floor of the building. 

Gateway Hall — This is a dormitory for forty-five college 



Bethany College Bulletin 103 

women. It is operated under conditions similar to those governing 
residents in Phillips Hall with a faculty resident in charge. 

Residence Homes for Women — The college operates other 
residence buildings for college women which are occupied by 
chapters of national sororities and are operated under conditions 
similar to those governing residents in Phillips Hall. 

Pendleton Heights — A short distance to the north of the 
Main Building on the campus is the home of the President of the 
College, known as Pendleton Heights. The building was erected 
by W. K. Pendleton, second president of the college. It was 
purchased by the college in 1890. The building is attractively fur- 
nished and is admirably suited for its intended purpose. 

Point Breeze — This manor house is operated by the college as 
a residence hall for married students and with a cooperative dining 
room plan. 

The Cochran Central Heating Plant — The college came 
into the possession of this building and its equipment through the 
generosity of Hon. M. M. Cochran of the Class of 1875. The heat- 
ing plant was completely remodeled and new units installed in 

1935. 
The College Farm and Farm Buildings — Through the 

generosity of the late E. W. Oglebay of the Class of 1869, Bethany 

College owns the Alexander Campbell farm of 205 acres. By a 

deed bearing date of April 7, 1914, Miss Margaretta E. Parkinson 

has given to the college the farm of 251 acres adjoining the 

college. 

LIBRARIES 

Library and Reading Room Equipment — The Bethany Col- 
lege Library contains approximately 42,000 volumes of carefully 
selected books and periodicals designed primarily to meet the 
needs of the students of an undergraduate liberal arts college. In 
addition there is a large collection of vertical file materials, news- 
papers, and government documents. The books are classified by 
the Dewey Decimal Classification and are catalogued by Library 
of Congress rules using Library of Congress printed cards when 
available. The library receives approximately 300 periodicals 
covering all subject fields offered by the college and nine news- 
papers including three foreign language papers. 

The reference collection, newspapers, periodicals, and library 



104 Bethany College Bulletin 

offices are located on the first floor. On the second floor are the 
main library desk, the card catalogue, the main book stacks, and 
the reserve book collection. On the third floor there is a recrea- 
tional reading room, the religious collection, and the Alexander 
Campbell Memorial Room housing the materials of interest to the 
Disciples of Christ. 

General Regulations — The building is closed during con- 
vocation hours and on all scheduled college holidays, but is open 
every day in the week. Books from the stacks may be charged out 
for a two-week period and may be renewed. Reserve books may 
be charged out for two-hour periods during the day and for over- 
night use when the library is closed. Books in the reference collec- 
tion and periodicals, bound and unbound, are not available for 
general circulation but are to be used in the building. 

Special Collections — Several personal libraries and collec- 
tions have been received by the college and have been made a 
part of the College Library. The principal parts of the libraries 
of Alexander Campbell, Robert Richardson, Miss A. C. Pendleton, 
Archibald McLean, W. S. Priest, Levi Marshall, Miss Mary I. 
Nichols, R. H. Wynne, Cloyd Goodnight, M. M. Cochran, Anna 
Ruth Bourne, and Clarence A. Hanna are among these. A valuable 
library of early literature of the Disciples of Christ has come from 
Samuel Lindsay, Buffalo, New York; from Rev. W. S. Good of 
Youngs town, Ohio; and from Miss Ellen Thomas of Augusta, 
Georgia, Ben S. Ferral, and others. The college wishes to make 
grateful acknowledgement of many gifts from graduates, former 
students, and friends of books, periodicals, and manuscripts of 
particular interest to the college and the church. 

The Library is building up a collection of recordings for the use 
of the Music Department and the members of the student body. 
At the present time, there are about 150 albums available includ- 
ing all the standard symphonies, concertos, and operas. 

This past year the Library has added a collection of framed pic- 
tures selected by the Art Department which are available to the 
students on regular library loan for their rooms. 

Christopher Graham Library — A small library for leisure 
time reading is maintained in the Men's Lounge at Cochran Hall. 
This library is dedicated to the memory of "a truly fine college 
boy" who was a student leader and resident in Cochran Hall in 

I932-I933- 



Bethany College Bulletin - 105 

Dagney Andersen Library — In one of the loggias in Phillips 
Hall a small library for leisure time reading is maintained for the 
use of college women. It is dedicated to the memory of Miss 
Dagney Andersen, of the Class of 1935, who was one of Bethany's 
most representative college women. 

INSTRUCTIONAL EQUIPMENT 

Biology Laboratories — The biology laboratories and con- 
ference rooms are located on the first floor of Oglebay Hall. These 
laboratories are adequately equipped to take care of courses in 
general biology, plant morphology and physiology, bacteriology, 
comparative anatomy, embryology, and histology. Special re- 
search facilities are available for students in the upper division. 
Work shops for ornithology and taxidermy, modeling, and other 
departmental activities are situated in the basement of Oglebay 
Hall. 

Chemical Laboratories — These laboratories occupy the sec- 
ond and third floors of Oglebay Hall. They consist of a general 
laboratory, an analytical laboratory, and well-equipped labora- 
tory for organic and physical chemistry. There are also two minor 
research laboratories, a spectroscopic laboratory, balance rooms, 
chemical storerooms, and a small machine shop. General apparatus 
is adequate for individual instruction in all courses offered. 

Physics Laboratory — The rooms used by the Department of 
Physics are on the first floor of the Main Building. Modern equip- 
ment sufficient for elementary and advanced physics courses is in 
the possession of the college. Special apparatus is available for 
work in the fields of magnetism, photo-elasticity, electronics, 
cosmic rays and astronomy. An E-i spectrograph, loaned to the 
college by the Follansbee Brothers Steel Company, is available 
for research work in steel analysis and other fields of spectroscopy. 

Psychological Laboratory — The laboratory for experimental 
psychology is located on the second floor of the Main Building in 
connection with the psychology lecture room. The laboratory is 
equipped for work in elementary experimental psychology, mental 
measurements, and some phases of applied psychology. 

Music Equipment — The studios and practice rooms of the De- 
partment of Music are located on the first floor of Commencement 
Hall. They are well equipped with upright and grand pianos of 



lo6 Bethany College Bulletin 

well-known make for the use of students taking work in music. A 
two-manual Teller-Kent pipe organ is available in Commencement 
Hall for students of music. An additional pipe organ at the 
Bethany Memorial Church is also available. The vocal work in 
music is facilitated by the use of a voice recording machine. 

ENDOWMENTS 

The book value of the endowments of the college as of June 30, 
1945 was $2,988,608. 80. 

The M. M. Cochran General Endowment — On January 25, 
1921, Hon. M. M. Cochran of the Class of 1875, g ave Bethany 
certain valuable assets, the proceeds of which are known as the 
M. M. Cochran General Endowment Fund. Further securities 
were added to this endowment in 1929 to strengthen and secure 
the original donation. The value of this gift to the college is placed 
at $500,000. 

The M. M. Cochran Endowment of 1923 — On February 19, 
1923, Mr. Cochran gave $300,000 to the college to be known as 
the M. M. Cochran Endowment of 1923. This was part of the 
campaign to secure endowment for the college in cooperation with 
the General Education Board and resulted in increasing the en- 
dowments of the college by $600,000. 

The M. M. Cochran Endowment of Office and Chair of 
President — In collaboration with the Men and Millions Move- 
ment of the Disciples of Christ, M. M. Cochran began an endow- 
ment of the President's Chair at Bethany College. Subsequent 
donations increased the endowment for this chair to $100,000. 

The M. M. Cochran Trust Funds — On the death of M. M. 
Cochran three special funds were set up subject to certain remain- 
der interests, the balance of the income to be used for the general 
purposes of the college. Certain life interests being satisfied, these 
trust funds are to become a part of the M. M. Cochran general 
endowment. The value of these trusts is $805,695.36. 

The Thomas W. Phillips Bible Chair Endowment — Hon. 
Thomas W. Phillips, Sr., of New Castle, Pennsylvania, has given 
$30,000 to endow a chair known as the Thomas W. Phillips Bible 
Chair. 

The Sarah B. Cochran Chair of Philosophy Endowment — 
Mrs. Sarah B. Cochran of Dawson, Pennsylvania, has contributed 



Bethany College Bulletin 107 

$25,000 toward the endowment of a chair to be known as the Sarah 
B. Cochran Chair of Philosophy. 

The Herbert Moninger Chair of Bible School Pedagogy 
Endowment — Through the interest and generosity of many Bible 
schools, churches, and individuals a fund of $25,000 has been given 
to the college for the endowment of the Moninger Memorial Chair 
of Bible School Pedagogy. Herbert Moninger was a graduate of 
the Class of 1898. 

The George T. Oliver Chair of History Endowment — The 
late Senator George T. Oliver of the Class of 1868 gave $50,000 
to the permanent endowment fund to be used for the endowment 
of the George T. Oliver Chair of History. 

The R. A. Long Chair of Mathematics Endowment — In 
connection with the Men and Millions Movement of the Disciples 
of Christ, R. A. Long of Kansas City, Missouri, gave $50,000 to 
the endowment fund of the college. This amount was to be used to 
endow the Chair of Mathematics. 

The Thomas W. Phillips, Jr., Endowment — Hon. H. W. 
Phillips, Jr., of Butler, Pennsylvania, has donated $55,000 to the 
general endowment of the college to be known as the T. W. Phil- 
lips, Jr., Endowment Fund. 

The E. M. Rine Trust Fund — The late E. M. Rine, of Mont- 
clair, New Jersey, bequeathed to the college a large share of his 
estate. Monies from this estate are placed in the E. M. Rine Trust 
Fund as they are received and are disbursed in accordance with 
the action of the Board of Trustees. Approximately $219,000 of 
this has been used for special purposes. The present value of the 
property and securities remaining in the trust fund is approxi- 
mately $75,000 and is temporarily designated as endowment. An 
additional $90,000 will come to the college from this source at a 
future date. 

The Anna Ruth Bourne Fund — Anna Ruth Bourne, for many 
years professor and head of the Department of English, be- 
queathed to the college her library and the sum of $12,000 as a 
gift to the endowment funds of the college. The income from this 
fund is to be used to purchase books and supplies for the Depart- 
ment of English. 



108 Bethany College Bulletin 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

The Gans Fund — The Gans Fund was established by Wick- 
liffe Campbell Gans, graduate of Bethany College in the Class of 
1870, and his brother, Emmett W. Gans, in memory of their father 
and mother, Dr. Daniel L. Gans and Margaret Gordon Gans of 
East Sparta, Stark County, Ohio. This fund has a value of $50,000, 
the income from which is to be used to encourage advance study 
and research in science by juniors, seniors, and graduates of 
Bethany College. 

The J. T. Smith Fund — J. T. Smith bequeathed $17,216 to the 
college, the income of which is to be used to assist young men and 
women who are studying for the Christian ministry. 

The Minnie W. Schaefer Fund — Minnie W. Schaefer has 
given a sum of $8,000 to Bethany College, which sum has been 
designated by the trustees to be used for assistance of students at 
the college preparing for definite Christian service, and subject to 
future action of the Board of Trustees. 

The Anna L. Helwig Fune> — Anna L. Helwig donated to the 
college the sum of $32,000 for the general purposes of the college. 
This sum is temporarily designated as endowment subject to fu- 
ture action by the Board of Trustees. 

The Josiah N. Wilson Fund — Josiah N. Wilson donated to 
the college the sum of $2,567.03, the income of which is to be used 
to assist such students as may be studying for service in the Chris- 
tian Ministry and may be designated by the President of the col- 
lege. 

The William Kimbrough Pendleton Endowment Fund — 
By the will of Clarinda Pendleton Lemar, the sum of $20,000 was 
bequeathed to the college to establish the William Kimbrough 
Pendleton Scholarship Fund in memory of her father, William 
Kimbrough Pendleton, who was a member of the first faculty of 
the college in 1841 and served as vice president and treasurer until 
elected as the second president of the college in 1866 in which 
position he served till 1889. The income from this fund is to be 
awarded to students from West Virginia under such conditions as 
the faculty may prescribe. 

The John H. and Ida H. King Trust Fund — The will of Ida 
H. King, recently probated, provides that one-tenth of the Trust 
Fund established by her will for her husband, John H. King, shall 



Bethany College Bulletin 109 

within three years after the death of her husband be bequeathed 
to the Trustees of Bethany College as a trust fund to be known and 
referred to as the "John H. and Ida H. King Trust Fund." The 
income from the Trust Fund is to be used for scholarship pur- 
poses — "rendering financial assistance by loan, gift, or otherwise, 
to worthy young students who are partially or wholly unable to 
finance their education, upon such terms and conditions as the 
Trustees or governing body thereof, and their successors, shall in 
their sole discretion deem advisable." 

Men and Millions Fund — Certain monies totalling $66,000 
received from the Men and Millions Movement of the Disciples 
of Christ is designated for the general purposes of the college. 
These funds are temporarily designated as endowment subject to 
future action by the Board of Trustees. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 



One of the expressed aims of the college is "To provide higher 
education in an atmosphere sympathetic to Christian ideals and 
Christian faith and to conserve and develop the moral character 
and religious life of its students." This aim is meant to bear upon 
instruction, counseling, and social life as well as formal religious 
services. 

Convocation — A fifty minute convocation is held each Wednes- 
day and Friday at eleven o'clock. Lectures by faculty members 
and noted visitors, drama, music, and student presentations are 
the'most frequent elements of the convocation service. Attendance 
is obligatory for all students. The convocation service is in no wise 
sectarian. 

The College Church — All students regardless of denomina- 
tional affiliations are welcome as "Student Members" of the 
Bethany Memorial Church. One of the active organizational 
groups of the church is the Council on Student Work through 
which are coordinated the various religious activities of the stu- 
dent body. Opportunity of personal counseling with the minister 
is offered. Every Sunday there is morning worship in charge of the 
minister. In the evening service there is an informal service which 
provides devotional expression and religious stimulus through a 
variety of mediums such as addresses and forums, motion pictures, 
religious drama, and vocal and instrumental concerts. 

Pre-Easter Services — Devotional services are held in the 
Bethany Memorial Church at noon each day during the week pre- 
ceding Easter or Palm Sunday. Arrangements are in charge of 
students of the college. 

Instruction — Since its inception, the Bible has been a recog- 
nized textbook in the college and each student is asked to pursue 
this study for at least one year. The approach is intended to be 
sympathetic and constructive. 

LECTURES AND CONCERTS 

One of the privileges of the student body at Bethany College is 
that of hearing outstanding lecturers, musicians, and leaders of 



Bethany College Bulletin hi 

thought. During the current year the following people have ap- 
peared on campus programs : 

Mr. Howard Cleaves, Lecturer and Photographer 

Mr. Kurt Singer, Lecturer and Member of the Danish Under- 
ground 

Dr. Max Salvadori, Institute of International Education 

Mrs. May Yoho Ward, Executive Secretary of Latin- American 
Mission for the Disciples of Christ 

Mr. Julian DeGray, Pianist-Lecturer, Association of Ameri- 
can Colleges Arts Program 

Dr. Arnold Nash, McCormick Theological Seminary 

Miss Camilla Wicks, Violinist 

Mr. Henrick Deboer, Tenor 

The Strawbridge Ballet 

The Fisk Jubilee Singers 

Miss Ann Voth, Contralto 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student Board of Governors — As a means of governing and 
directing student interest and student activities, the Student 
Board of Governors is maintained by the student body as a legisla- 
tive and executive body. Matters pertaining to athletics, debating, 
student publications, social affairs, and general student interests 
are given attention. The major part of the activity fee is used by 
this Board for the various student organizations. The Board co- 
operates with the college administration in building an intelli- 
gent appreciation of social responsibility in college community 
life. 

Athletic — In order to supplement the courses in physical 
education which are required of all freshmen and sophomores who 
are found upon examination to be physically able to carry the 
work, Bethany College maintains intramural and intercollegiate 
teams in many sports. All athletics and physical recreation are 
under the supervision of the Athletic Board of Control, which is 
made up of the faculty committee on athletics, appointed by the 
president of the college, and four members of the student body. 
The student members of this committee are chosen, one from 
each of the three upper classes in the college, and one from the 



H2 Bethany College Bulletin 

Women's Athletic Association, each group selecting its own repre- 
sentative. 

Bethany has taken a position of leadership among tri-state col- 
leges by its established athletic policy, which eliminates all pro- 
fessionalism from its program. Intercollegiate competition in foot- 
ball, basketball, tennis, cross-country, track and field continues. 
An intramural program has been developed in order to provide op- 
portunity for all to participate in some form of athletic endeavor. 
Sports which are provided for on the intramural program are soc- 
cer, volleyball, swimming, archery, tennis, softball, handball, 
hockey, basketball, and touch football. 

Students participating in intramural and intercollegiate ath- 
letics do so at their own risk. 

Association of Women Students — This Association, of which 
every woman student is automatically a member upon her en- 
trance into college, has as its main purpose the building of larger 
and wider life attitudes through giving the college woman a fuller 
opportunity for experience in leadership and for sharing with the 
college the responsibility for her conduct. 

Women's Athletic Association — The Women's Athletic As- 
sociation encourages and fosters the participation of all women of 
the college in swimming, the dance, and many different sports and 
games. The sports leaders make up the Athletic Board of the 
W. A. A. 

Student Publication — Under the management of the Student 
Board of Publications the students publish the Bethanian, issued 
at spaced intervals in magazine form to be compiled through the 
year into a final yearbook form. The student fee covers the cost 
of this publication and so every student is entitled to a copy of 
each issue. 

Ministerial Association — This association is made up of 
young men of the student body who are preparing for the work of 
the Christian ministry. This group of students holds a prominent 
place in the life of the college. Fortnightly meetings are held, at 
which vital problems relating to the ministry and the churches are 
discussed. 

Y. W. C. A. — Membership in the Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation is open to all women students. This organization strives 
to serve religious, aesthetic, and social needs by conducting regu- 



Bethany College Bulletin 113 

lar worship services and sponsoring discussion groups. One of the 
projects of the organization is the maintenance of the Dagney 
Anclersen Memorial Library in Phillips Hall. 

Clubs and Societies — Several active clubs and societies are 
sponsored by various departments in the college. The work of the 
French Club, Sociology Club, Chemistry Club, German Club, 
Spanish Club, International Relations Club, Psychology Club, 
Writers' Club, and Radio Club have been most notable. Papers 
dealing with interesting topics are presented by students, faculty 
members, and out of town speakers. 

The H. T. McKinney Chapter of the Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica was chartered at the college in the fall of 1942. 

Fraternities — Several of the strong Greek letter fraternities 
have chapters at Bethany. The fraternities for men are: Beta 
Theta Pi, Sigma Nu, Phi Kappa Tau, Kappa Alpha, and Alpha 
Kappa Pi. The fraternities for women are: Alpha Xi Delta, Zeta 
Tau Alpha, Kappa Delta, and Phi Mu. All have national affilia- 
tions. 

MUSIC AND DRAMATICS 

College Choir — This mixed chorus of thirty-six voices sings 
each Sunday morning at Bethany Memorial Church and gives 
special programs, in and away from Bethany, including oratoria, 
cantata, and miscellaneous works. Membership is open to all stu- 
dents accepted by the director. 

College Orchestra — This musical organization is made up of 
students who have a proficiency on orchestral instruments. Ad- 
mission is gained by satisfactorily passing an individual examina- 
tion given by the director. Several concerts are given during the 
year and music is furnished for some of the dramatic performances. 

College Band — The college band is open to all students who 
show by individual examination a sufficient mastery of their in- 
strument for the type of music to be played. This organization 
plays for many public occasions throughout the year. 

Dramatics — The program of drama enjoys a prominent place 
in the life of the college. Two clubs constitute the nuclei of play 
production: the Bethespian of open membership; and a chapter of 
the national dramatic fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, in which stu- 



1 14 Bethany College Bulletin 

dents may become members by meeting the national require- 
ments. Departmental clubs at times present plays and the choir 
collaborates in joint productions with the Bethespians. 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Student Scholarship — The average size of the classes as or- 
ganized enables the instructors to give each student individual 
attention; in many cases classes are divided into several sections 
to secure this result. At stated times students whose work in any 
department is unsatisfactory are reported to the Admissions and 
Personnel Office by the instructor in charge of the work in ques- 
tion. An effort is made in each case to discover the cause of the 
trouble, and by giving encouragement, admonition, advice, or as- 
sistance as appears to be needed, to put the student in the way of 
successfully carrying out his work. 

Classification of Students — The classification of students is 
determined at the beginning of each year according to the follow- 
ing plan : For sophomore rank a student must have at least twenty- 
five hours of academic credit and twenty-five quality points. Ad- 
mission to the upper division or full junior standing is conditioned 
upon the student having at least sixty hours of academic credit, 
sixty quality points, and he must have passed the sophomore gen- 
eral examination. For senior class rank the student must have at 
least ninety-four hours of academic credit and ninety-four quality 
points, and have completed all prescribed courses for graduation. 
No student is considered as a candidate for the baccalaureate 
degree until granted senior classification. 

The Grading System — The class standing of a student in any 
course pursued is reported by the use of letters. The meaning of 
letters used may be given as follows: 

A — Excellent. The letter A is used to denote work of unusual 
merit. This grade carries three quality points for each 
hour of credit. 
B — Good. This letter is used to show appreciation and grasp 
of the subject that is distinctly above the average and 
very satisfactory. This grade carries two quality points 
for each hour of credit. 
C — Average. This letter signifies the grade of work done by 
an average student. It is expected that between fifty and 



Bethany College Bulletin 115 

sixty per cent of grades given will be C. This grade car- 
ries one quality point for each hour of credit. 
D — Inferior. This letter denotes work below the average. It 
shows a lack of application or of ability to grasp the sub- 
ject. This grade carries no quality points, 
con. — This abbreviation denotes conditional failure. The stu- 
dent is granted the privilege of taking an examination to 
remove the condition, or, in case of a continuous course, 
it may be automatically removed by the student making 
a grade of C or better the following semester. Failure to 
do so within the following semester will result in the grade 
being changed to F. Regardless of the manner of removing 
the condition no higher grade than D will be allowed, 
inc. — The abbreviation inc. denotes uncompleted work as a re- 
sult of sickness or some other justifiable reason. An in- 
complete mark should be removed by the end of the 
fourth week in the following semester, unless an extension 
of time is granted. It is not possible for a student to re- 
move an incomplete mark after twelve months. 
F — Failure. The letter F denotes work that is definitely un- 
satisfactory and the course not passed. 
W — Withdrawn. The mark WF means that the student was 
failing at the time of withdrawal, and WP means that he 
was passing at the time of withdrawal. 
A report of the scholastic standing of students is received at the 
Office of Admissions and Personnel at the mid-semester time in 
addition to the final semester reports. These reports are sent to the 
faculty counselor of each student and to parents or guardian. 

Probation — The term "on probation" is applied to students 
who are continued in college after having failed to satisfy aca- 
demic requirements to a proper degree, or who, by reason of de- 
portment, do not meet the standards expected by faculty and ad- 
ministration. 

A student shall be placed on probation for one semester if in the 
semester preceding he has failed to pass in nine hours of regular 
college work and earn at least six quality points. He shall be con- 
tinued on probation until the end of that semester. If he passes in 
twelve hours of college work and earns twelve quality points in the 
semester, he may be removed from probation. 

If he fails to pass twelve hours and earn twelve quality points, 



n6 Bethany College Bulletin 

he can not be continued except by special action. It is understood 
that one semester on probation is to be the limit and that it is not 
the intention of the faculty to have students continuing in college 
if they do not do satisfactory academic work. 

A student who fails to pass in less than six hours of academic 
work in any one semester can not be continued into the next se- 
mester. 

During the period of probation a student may be limited in his 
academic schedule, in participation in extra-curricular activities, 
or in social life. Such limitation may be imposed by his faculty 
counselor or by any proper officer of administration. The determi- 
nation of actual eligibility to participate in intercollegiate or extra- 
curricular activities shall rest with the counselor and the Commit- 
tee on Admissions and Classifications. 

Provisional Enrollment — The term "provisional enrollment" 
is applied to the status of students who are permitted to enroll for 
a provisional period of two weeks pending the receipt of secondary 
school record, the payment of the required amount on account, or 
pending the fulfillment of any other proper requirement of the 
administration. This is intended to cover the cases with which the 
Deans, the Committee on Admissions and Classifications, or the 
Bursar have to deal. 

Penalty for Late Registration — Students in attendance 
during any semester must register on the opening day of the fol- 
lowing semester, if they desire to continue their work. For the 
first three days two dollars is charged for each day of delay in 
registration and class absences will be counted against the stu- 
dent for all days missed. This rule does not relate to students en- 
tering for the first semester. 

Student's Schedule — A student ordinarily carries fifteen or 
sixteen credit hours of academic work each semester but it is pos- 
sible for a student to carry additional credit hours with the per- 
mission of his faculty counselor. It is ordinarily expected that no 
student will carry more than nineteen credit hours in any one se- 
mester. 

Courses should not be changed or dropped except within the 
first week at the start of any one semester. In special cases a 
change can be made in courses or schedule with the consent of the 
instructors concerned, the student's counselor, and either the 
Dean of the Faculty or the Dean of Students. After the first week 



Bethany College Bulletin 117 

it is possible for a student to drop a course only if the counselor 
and the Deans feel that the best interests of the student will be 
served by such procedure. Students are not permitted to drop any 
course without adequate reason and approval. 

Class Absences — Students are expected to attend all class or 
laboratory meetings of a course and to participate in any outside 
activities which are a part of the course. The final decision as to 
approving absences which may be required because of illness or 
urgent matters of any kind is in the hands of the instructors con- 
cerned. Proper penalties or requirements may be imposed by an 
instructor for absences of any kind. In most cases class attendance 
is essential if the student is to get the greatest profit. 

Students of superior ability and achievement are often allowed 
much freedom in the matter of class attendance and specific re- 
quirements. 

Withdrawal — An honorable discharge will be granted to any 
student who is in good academic standing and is not subject to 
discipline, who may desire to withdraw from the college, if he has 
satisfied his counselor and a responsible officer of the college, that 
there is a good reason to justify such action. Students asking to 
withdraw should present such a request to the counselor in writing 
with a statement of approval from parent or guardian. The recom- 
mendation of the counselor should then be presented to the 
Dean of Students for final approval and record. No withdrawal 
will be considered complete until this action has been taken. 

Final Examinations — All students are required to take the ex- 
aminations that come during the last week of each semester. Those 
who show by class work and examination that they are entitled to 
a grade D or above are passed. The seniors are required only to 
take the comprehensive examination in the final semester if their 
academic work in all courses is satisfactory. 

Special Examinations — A student who has been marked con- 
ditional in his course at the end of the semester may, with the 
consent of the instructor, be given an opportunity to take a second 
examination on the payment of a fee of $1.00. When a student is 
justifiably absent from a final examination he may have a special 
test upon the payment of a fee of $2.00. Fees for special examina- 
tions must be paid at the office of the Bursar before the examina- 
tions are taken. The Bursar's receipt must be presented to the 
instructor at the time of the examination and delivered by the in- 



n8 Bethany College Bulletin 

structor to the Recorder together with the grade given the stu- 
dent. 

Report of Student's Progress — At any time parents or 
guardians are free to request further information concerning the 
development, ability, and progress of a student. Requests should 
be made to the Dean of Students or the Recorder. 

Advanced Enrollment — On or before the second Monday in 
May all students of the college are obliged to fill out advance en- 
rollment blanks indicating the courses of study planned for the 
coming year. In the case of freshmen, these courses are selected 
under the direction of the freshman counselors. In the case of stu- 
dents who have selected a major, the professor in charge of the 
department elected will counsel regarding the student's curricu- 
lum. 

Transfer of Records — Students wishing to transfer from Beth- 
any College to another institution should request the Admissions 
and Personnel Office to send an official transcript of record and 
notice of honorable dismissal, giving notice of at least one week. 
One transcript is furnished for each student without charge; for 
each additional record a fee of one dollar is charged, this fee to be 
sent to the office with the request. All financial obligations to the 
college must be paid before a transcript can be issued. 

Summer Courses — Credit will be given for a limited amount of 
work done in the summer session of an approved college or uni- 
versity. Permission for summer study must be secured from the 
Committee on Admissions and Classifications. 

Fraternity and Sorority Initiation — Students shall not be 
initiated into any fraternity or sorority until they have satisfied 
the entrance requirements of the college, have fifteen hours of 
resident collegiate work credited on the college books, and have 
earned at least fifteen resident quality points. 

Junior Year Abroad — Specially qualified students may sub- 
stitute for the work of the junior year in the college a year of study 
in Europe or England, under proper supervision and direction. To 
be eligible for the junior year abroad, the student ordinarily must 
have an average grade of B or over in the work of the first three 
semesters. Each application must be approved by the faculty. 
Any student who may wish to avail himself or herself of this op- 
portunity should present the request in writing to the Committee 



Bethany College Bulletin 119 

on Admissions and Classifications before the end of the semester of 
his or her sophomore year. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

Medical and Physical Examinations — A medical and physi- 
cal examination of every new student is made during the first 
weeks of the college year by the college physician. It is strongly 
recommended that all students be examined at least once each year 
by the family physician and dentist. All students are urged to be 
vaccinated and to have tuberculin and blood tests either at home 
or at the college dispensary. 

Vaccination — All applicants for admission must have been 
vaccinated within the past three years, or they must arrange to 
be vaccinated by the Student Health Service within one month 
after entrance unless excused by the Committee on Admissions 
and Classifications. 

Sickness — Each student is expected to report to the college dis- 
pensary in case of sickness of any kind. In the case of contagious or 
infectious disease, students will be expected to give absolute ob- 
servance to any regulations which may be prescribed by the col- 
lege officers or the county health officials. 

The college physician is at the dispensary each day for consulta- 
tion, examination, and treatment. Students are urged to report all 
injuries, diseases, or untoward symptoms, no matter how trivial 
they may seem. No extensive medical or surgical procedures are 
carried out at the dispensary but all minor ailments will be cared 
for, and some medicines will be supplied. Arrangements can be 
made for vaccinations, cold serums, and special treatment. The 
college physician is available for consultation and professional 
service without charge only at the dispensary. 

Students are required to report all illnesses which entail ab- 
sences from 8:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. classes to the house hostess or 
faculty resident before 9:00 a.m. The hostess will call the college 
nurse at the dispensary and inform the nurse if the student is un- 
able to report there. Students may not call to request nursing serv- 
ices outside the dispensary. 

Students are free to employ either the college physician or a 
physician of their own choice in any case of illness. Well trained 
physicians are available in Wellsburg and Wheeling. 



120 Bethany College Bulletin 

Infirmary — The college infirmary, in charge of the college 
nurse and her assistants, is maintained while college is in session. 
It includes the doctor's office, treatment room, medicine room, and 
small wards for men and women. The infirmary is not open for 
dispensary service, diagnosis or treatment, and the services of the 
college physician are not available there without charge. It is in- 
tended only for bed-patients. The college nurse is in charge of the 
infirmary and is available at all hours at the college dispensary or 
infirmary for emergencies, but she is not subject to call for minor 
matters, dispensary service, or any services that can be cared for 
at the college dispensary during regular office hours. 

In case of need each student is entitled to three days of care in 
the infirmary with no additional charge. For periods in excess of 
this time a nominal charge of $2.00 per day is made. Students not 
boarding in college dining halls will be charged #1.50 per day for 
board during the period of hospitalization. 

SOCIAL REGULATIONS 

Student Residence — No student in any college year shall be 
permitted to reside or board in any place which has not been listed 
as approved. Fraternity and sorority houses, private dwellings, 
and dormitory rooms where students are living, must at all times 
be open for inspection and appraisal as to influences and conditions 
relating to morals, health, and social culture. All freshmen are re- 
quired to live in the college dormitories through the entire first 
year. 

Social Life — The men and women of the college meet under 
conditions intended to provide a pleasant and wholesome social 
life. A reasonable amount of social recreation is encouraged, 
though such diversion is restricted within limits considered most 
favorable to the welfare of the students. It is understood and ex- 
pected that all students will observe the usual social conventions 
and individual students will be governed by discretion and regard 
for propriety, without the existence of minute and specific rules. 
Immorality, drinking, or other gross misconduct on the part of 
students may result in immediate suspension or dismissal from the 
college. 

The women of the college live either in Phillips Hall, Gateway 
Hall, or in sorority houses. Each is presided over by a house 



Bethany College Bulletin 121 

hostess or a faculty resident. The Academic Adviser for Women is 
in charge of the general supervision of the college women, with the 
direct responsibility for regulation of social life, residence, and so- 
cial privileges, etc., in charge of the Head of Residence for Women. 

The dormitory for men affords at once a home for residents 
therein, and a center for the activities of the men of the college. 
Fraternity houses provide home and social life for some of the 
upperclassmen. 

All student organizations are required to obtain permission from 
the Head of Residence for Women before giving an entertainment 
or function of any kind either on or off the campus. A social calen- 
dar is kept in her office in which all public functions must be 
registered in advance. 

Student Conduct — In the administration of college regulations 
it is the policy of the administration to be guided in the treatment 
of the individual cases largely by the recommendation of the stu- 
dent's counselor and by the general attitude of the student toward 
the college, i.e., whether or not he has proved himself a creditable 
member of the college community, as shown by regularity in at- 
tendance, promptness in the fulfillment of his obligations, earnest- 
ness in his endeavors to profit by the college opportunities, and in 
consideration of high standards in social and moral conduct. 

The whole record of each student will be looked into at the end 
of each semester with reference to his conduct in the community 
as well as his academic attainments. If the student's conduct has 
been satisfactory and is likely to remain so, the administration 
will consider whether the student is justifying his candidacy for 
a college degree. Students who do not show promise of accomplish- 
ment will not be allowed to continue. It is expected that a student 
who earned credits at Bethany College must satisfy the faculty as 
to uprightness of character as well as accomplishments in scholar- 
ship. 

It is earnestly desired that undergraduates may be influenced 
to good conduct and good scholarship by higher motives than fear 
of punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the courtesy and 
generous feeling natural to young men and women engaged in lib- 
eral pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of conduct. 
It is the policy of the college administration and faculty to allow 
in all things as much liberty as will not be abused, and the stu- 
dents are invited and expected to cooperate with the faculty and 



122 Bethany College Bulletin 

college officers. Students are answerable for their conduct during 
vacation no less than in term time. 

There is no need for students to maintain automobiles in 
Bethany and they have proved a detriment to scholarship and a 
temptation to waste much time. The maintenance of an automo- 
bile or motorcycle in Bethany or vicinity without the permission 
of the college faculty is positively forbidden. 

Changes in Regulation Covering Courses of Study, De- 
grees, Discipline, Etc. — The college administration reserves the 
right to amend the regulations covering the granting of degrees, 
the courses of study, and the conduct of students. Membership 
in Bethany College and the receiving of a degree are privileges, 
not rights. The college reserves the right, and the student concedes 
to the college the right, to require the withdrawal of any student 
at any time without explanation or trial. 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



INSTRUCTION 



The dominant tone in the instructional activities at Bethany 
College is an emphasis upon the common adventure of students 
and instructors in learning and living. The college experience is 
interwoven with opportunities for exchanging ideas, for giving and 
absorbing inspiration, and for all kinds of cordial faculty-student 
relationships. 

The instructional and guidance plan of the college makes it pos- 
sible to treat students as individuals with differences in experience, 
attitudes, and interests. During the first two years, there are fre- 
quent individual conferences for the student with his counselor on 
the progress in courses, projects of study undertaken, and total 
adjustment in academic, vocational, and social matters. During 
the last two years of the college experience independent work and 
self-propelled study are given greater consideration. 

In regular courses the writing of papers upon projects involving 
independent research and critical thinking is emphasized, and con- 
ferences upon these papers involve close discussion with instruc- 
tors as to content, soundness and effectiveness of the students* 
work. Special problems courses for individual study may be 
planned for reading and research in materials not covered by the 
formal courses, and in the laboratories minor research is promoted. 
Systematic reading and independent study of all kinds during the 
summer as well as during the college year, are encouraged and oc- 
casionally these form part of a student's formal program. 

The college strives to be a democracy of teaching and learning, 
in which the give-and-take of a discussion between students and 
instructors in frequent group conferences, in individual tutorial 
work and in the laboratories, encourages the development of the 
students' judgment and critical insight. Problems are freely and 
concretely discussed in an atmosphere of lively criticism. The char- 
acter of the college plan, a small and select student body and a 
relatively large faculty primarily interested in teaching and coun- 
seling, contribute to effective intellectual activity. 



124 Bethany College Bulletin 

LOWER DIVISION 

The college curriculum and general plan of instruction recognize 
a lower division and an upper division. The lower division repre- 
sents the traditional freshman and sophomore years, and the upper 
division the traditional junior and senior years. These divisions 
reflect the progression and educational growth that is expected of 
students as well as the differences in instructional procedure and 
purpose of the curriculum at the two levels. 

The work of the lower division is intended to complete what is 
usually termed a "general education ,, and it represents the under- 
girding of the student's cultural and academic experience. It is 
based on the belief that the student should become familiar with 
different fields of knowledge and that the program of general edu- 
cation offered in higher institutions should be essentially a con- 
tinuation, on a higher level, of academic work in the secondary 
school. Students are urged to elect widely in the instructional de- 
partments of the college and every major department has survey 
courses for the lower division students. 

One of the chief objectives in the first two years is for the stu- 
dent to discover the field or fields of human achievement in which 
he possesses a marked and sustained interest combined with dis- 
tinct ability. Some of the freshmen know what they want to do in 
college and will have valid reasons for so doing. Others have tem- 
porary enthusiasms, preferences and aversions based upon inade- 
quate school experience. Still others, although of good intellectual 
ability, have no well-defined intellectual purposes or interests. 
Oftentimes there is need to explore the possibilities in several of 
the instructional departments of the college. During either the 
secondary school or college years such exploration is a necessary 
basis for the intelligent choice of a field of major work. In the selec- 
tion of subjects or groups in the lower division, the student may 
be guided somewhat by the nature of the subjects taken in the 
secondary school so that by the close of the second year he will 
have a general acquaintance with several fields of knowledge. 

In the lower division the student usually completes the pre- 
scribed courses for graduation and he may elect some course work 
in a major field. The courses usually elected by freshmen include a 
foreign language, science or mathematics, history or political sci- 
ence, English, and physical education. A general survey examina- 



Bethany College Bulletin 125 

tion is given at the end of the lower division work. The individual 
profiles from this examination are used for educational guidance. 
This examination is given in cooperation with the program of the 
Committee on Measurement and Guidance of the American Coun- 
cil on Education. 

UPPER DIVISION 

In the upper division all students work directly under the pro- 
fessor in charge of the major subject. The teaching procedures and 
materials give emphasis to individual initiative and concentrated 
work. As far as possible the student's work is library-and-labora- 
tory centered. Extensive reading, problems, and seminars are regu- 
lar procedures in upper division instruction. The development of 
an ability to form thoughtful judgments and evaluations, the "at- 
titude of the searcher," and sustained intellectual interests, are a 
part of the instructional aims at this level. A comprehensive ex- 
amination, oral and written, in the major subject is required near 
the end of the senior year. 

Students are expected to select their major and minor work in 
departments that offer adequate courses, and in the upper division 
a large part of the student's program will center about this depart- 
ment and its allied fields. The major work should be planned as a 
unified and coherent whole. It should not consist of a series of un- 
related courses. Course distinctions need be retained only to such 
an extent as may be necessary to fit the existing machinery of the 
college, but they are not to be made sufficiently rigorous as to in- 
tefere with the establishment of a properly unified major. The ma- 
jor may be confined to the work of a single department, or related 
departments may offer "functional majors" embracing work in two 
departments, if the work is planned and administered as a homo- 
geneous unit. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Near the end of the senior year, as a final prerequisite to the de- 
gree, each student is required to pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion — written and oral — in his major subject; an examination 
which tests the accomplishments of the student in the whole range 
of the major. The written part of the examination is given in two 
days by the major department. The oral part is given at some 
designated time by a committee selected by the major department 



126 Bethany College Bulletin 

from the faculty of any accredited college or university. No course 
examinations are required at the end of the final semester unless 
the student is not doing satisfactory work in a course. The instruc- 
tor of that course may then require the semester examination as 
a final evaluation. 

The comprehensive examination is set and graded with the fol- 
lowing points in mind: it shall constitute a test of the major sub- 
ject as a whole and shall offer the opportunity to the student to 
show his powers of independent thought in that field; it shall not 
be a test in which the main stress is put on the memorization and 
repetition of facts; it shall not be a test, the passing of which is 
unduly difficult of attainment by students of ordinary intellectual 
ability who have honestly attempted the work of synthesizing the 
material of the major subjects; and it shall, at the same time, be a 
test sufficiently searching so that each student may have the op- 
portunity of showing to what extent he may have progressed in 
his powers of handling material in his chosen subject. 

A reading period of two weeks is set aside each year for all sen- 
iors who want to make a final review of materials before the ex- 
amination dates. Candidates for degrees are expected, however, to 
use the entire senior year in making a review and synthesis of their 
major work. 

STUDENT GUIDANCE 

From the beginning of his college career each student has an 
individual faculty counselor. After the freshman year the coun- 
selor is normally a faculty member in the field in which the student 
is doing his major work. The student has unusual opportunities 
to be in frequent contact with his counselor, and reports of ac- 
complishment and difficulties can be made directly to him. The 
student-counselor relationship, including in its range the student's 
entire personal and educational development, occupies a signifi- 
cant place in the college plan at Bethany. So far as possible it re- 
places general faculty regulations with an individualized program 
aiming at continuity, correlation, and integration of work. These 
counselors, while ministering to all the needs of the student, have 
as their most important function the interpretation and presenta- 
tion of sound educational objectives. 

The counselor is concerned with the student's selection of 
courses, his academic progress, standards of conduct, vocational 



Bethany College Bulletin 127 

plans and objectives, recreational and social expression. It is 
hoped that in personal counseling with faculty members there 
may be implanted in the student a vivid notion of definite and 
feasible goals toward which he can shape his course and an ap- 
preciation of the ideals of scholarship and character that belong to 
the best traditions of the academic world. 

The chief officer in charge of student welfare, student guidance, 
and the coordination of all personnel administration is the Dean 
of Students. His office is intended to unite all the functions and 
activities which relate themselves to the personal and educational 
development of individual students so that there may be an ade- 
quate understanding of their problems and a planned solution 
for the same. The Dean of Students shares in the counseling 
activities, giving a major part of his time to confronting and 
dealing with individual students and their adjustments to the 
college experience and to the larger society. Students may use his 
office and staff freely in all matters that concern their personal 
interests and needs as well as their educational progress and de- 
velopment. 



PART V 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN COURSE 
ROSTER OF STUDENTS 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN COURSE 

CLASS OF 1945 

On October 22 ', 1944 
Bachelor of Arts 

Summa Cum Laude 
Evelyn Sabolia 

Magna Cum Laude 
Jeanne Mitchell Jordan 

Cum Laude 

Beverly Barnes 

Mary Virginia Joseph 

Shirley Skilton 

Mary Wilkin 



Rite 



Elizabeth Bannen 
Gladys Brooks 
Frank Buechley, Jr. 
Barbara Chapman 
LeRoy D. Hall 
Ruth Judy 



Harriet Kolson 
Elaine Landgrebe 
Esther McCracken 
Jean Rylander 
Janet Whetstone 



Bachelor of Science 

Summa Cum Laude 
Esther McCandless 

Magna Cum Laude 

Rita Ganz 
Herman Steinberg 

Cum Laude 
Robert Stealey 



Rite 



Harold Carstensen* 
John E. Padden 
Anthony Publisi* 



Frank L. Reusche" 
Nancy Tomasek 



* In Absentia. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PASSED 
WITH DISTINCTION 

Beverly Barnes Music 

Rita Ganz Biology 

Jeanne Mitchell Jordan English 

Mary Virginia Joseph History 

Esther McCandless Biology 

Evelyn Sabolia French 

Robert Stealey Biology 

Herman Steinberg Chemistry 

On February i8 y 1945 
Bachelor of Arts 

Summa Cum Laude 
Herta Sylvia Lehrer 

Rite 
Leland E. Davis Betty Shaffer 

Charlotte Gay Marilyn Waugh 

Velma Rimko 

Bachelor of Science 

Cum Laude 

Arthur Beard* 
Reuben Ott 

Rite 

Dorothy Bright 

Mary Buccieri 

Emmet Moyers, Jr.* 

* In Absentia. 



COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PASSED 
WITH DISTINCTION 

Arthur Beard Chemistry 

Herta Sylvia Lehrer Psychology 

Reuben Ott Chemistry 

Marilyn Waugh Sociology 

On June if, 1945 
Bachelor of Arts 

Cum Laude 

Betty Anne Foley 

Alice Harvey 

Carol Kruse 

Willi Schwab 

Ruth Wagner 

Rite 

Spencer M. Adamson Sakaye Ishino 

Martha May Bright Olga Karp 

Marion Burns Julian Myers 

Nancy Cowen Betty Ann Reske 

Aimee Goss Ruth Rodgers 

Eugenia Grimshaw Anna Belle Todd 

Bachelor of Science 

Summa Cum Laude 
Gilbert Mellin 

Magna Cum Laude 

Kenneth Payne 

Virginia Stewart 

Margaret Weimer 

Cum Laude 
June Galm 

Rite 

Patricia Dell Ball George Northrup 

Charles Davis Bell* Dorris Shankroff 

Warren Joseph Brown James M. Trench* 

Anton DeFede Nancy Whitehead 

Betty Rose Mary Jones Frances Wright 

* In Absentia. 



HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED 

Doctor of Laws 

Mr. Thomas Campbell Clark, Washington, D. C. 

Doctor of Letters 

Mr. Frank Roy Gay, Bethany, W. Va. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS PASSED 
WITH DISTINCTION 

Betty Anne Foley Economics 

June Galm Biology 

Carol Kruse English 

Kenneth Payne Biology 

CLASS OF 1946 

On January 27, 1946 

Bachelor of Arts 

Magna Cum Laude 
Pauline Gilbert 

Cum Laude 
Mary Louise Truxal 

Rite 

Phyllis Miles Coldren Katherine Jones 

Janet Flint Isa Lazear 

Helen Golden Irving Phillips 

Nancy May Harrington Barbara Rose 

Bachelor of Science 

Summa Cum Laude 

Harold Kammen 
Rhoda Michaels 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION PASSED 
WITH DISTINCTION 

Mary Louise Truxal English 



ROSTER OF STUDENTS 

Summer Term 

1945 

Seniors 

Gilbert, Pauline 29 Ridgewood Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Jones, Katherine Box 632, Grove Road, Pittsburgh 10, Pa. 

Phillips, Irving 1677 Weston Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Juniors 

Ammon, Emma Lou 4 America Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

d'Aliberti, Alfred 13 18 Park Street, Steubenville, Ohio 

Gallagher, Doris 148 37th Street, Union City, N. J. 

Gibson, Gladys Bethany, W. Va. 

Weinrich, Marcel 1434 Morris Avenue, Bronx $6, N. Y. 

Sophomores 

Bishop, Geraldine 345 East 36th Street, Paterson, N. J. 

Fannin, Donald 1920 McCauslen Manor, Steubenville, Ohio 

Golden, Gordon Eugene 2201 Richland Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Hallock, Helen Akron Road, Medina, Ohio 

Moody, Antoinette 43 Balmiere Parkway, Cranford, N. J. 

Ornold, Joyce 517 North Front Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Wohrley, Melville Box 791, Fairview Road, Newark, Ohio 

Freshmen 

Albertsen, Robert 206 West Eighth Avenue, Huntington, W. Va. 

Baumgarten, Irene 511 West 113th Street, New York 25, N. Y. 

Binder, Mary Elizabeth 227 Main Street, East Rutherford, N. J. 

Burton, Donna Beth 15 Cumberland Road, Glen Rock, N. J. 

Byers, Mary Margaret 19 Warden Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Coble, Robert 324 West Main Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Criswell, Charles 161 Valley Boulevard, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Eberhard, Robert 1 502 Hildreth Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Fallon, Mary 7410 Ridge Boulevard, Brooklyn 9, N. Y. 

Fox, Rose Anne Twin Oaks, Llewellyn Park, West Orange, N. J. 

Gallas, James Mozart, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Golbey, Donald 253 Stuyvesant Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gottlieb, Stuart 1678 Grant Avenue, New York $3, N. Y. 

Halley, Vivian 239 86th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Henderson, James Waynesburg Pike, Moundsville, W. Va. 

Karavanic, Violet William Penn Highway, Weirton, W. Va. 

Kerr, Burton 311 West Fifth Street, East Liverpool, Ohio 

Kleesattel, Robert. 23 East Fairview Avenue, Dayton 5, Ohio 



136 Bethany College Bulletin 

Kuntze, Naomi 2019 Greene Avenue, Ridgewood, N. Y. 

Mamakos, Nick 132,0 National Road, Wheeling, W. Va. 

McAnallen, Victor 413 Franklin Street, Butler, Pa. 

Renner, Robert 1259 Oakridge Drive, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Scott, Ella Mae Box 166, Harper Road, Beckley, W. Va. 

Simson, Harold 156 Delaware Street, Tonawanda, N. Y, 

Sklar, Jordan 1 106 Morris Avenue, New York $6 y N. Y. 

Smith, J. Robert 647 Cove Road, Hollidays Cove, W. Va. 

Umbel, Forest Kay R.F.D., Uniontown, Pa. 

Weimer, Alexander Bethany, W. Va. 

Weser, Emma Lou R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Unclassified Students 

Yochem, Nancy 11 Ridgewood Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 



ROSTER OF NAVY V-12 STUDENTS 
Summer Semester 1945 

Adams, Mark, H., Jr 328 N. Pershing, Wichita 8, Kan. 

Armstrong, Alexander Waterloo Avenue, Berwyn, Pa. 

Atherton, Charles John 1104 Reef Road, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Bauermeister, Walter 13 12 Charlotte Avenue, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Blair, Frank Richard 27 Ashland Avenue, East Orange, N. J. 

Blechman, Frederick 2288 Mott Avenue, Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

Boggs, Richard Lee R.R. 3, Columbia City, Ind. 

Boyajian, Ara Martin 197 Hillside Avenue, Hartford, Conn. 

Breen, William Robert 6 Liberty Place, Weehawken, N. J. 

Brown, Edward M Hartwood, R.D. 2, Sharpsburg, Pa. 

Burke, Joseph H 208 W. South Orange Avenue, South Orange, N. J. 

Cahill, Francis Joseph North Windham, Conn. 

Carey, Harold Sheridan, Jr 1 Allen Court, Barre, Mass. 

Carmody, Barry Scott 130 Dudley Avenue, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Chorbajian, Albert Haig 43 Stockton Place, East Orange, N. J. 

Claney, John H 400 Strathmore Road, Brookline, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Clough, Arthur Frederick 157 Jeralemon Street, Belleview, N. J. 

Coates, John Joseph, Jr 315 John Street, Roselle, N. J. 

Corcoran, Laurence R 530 Ardmore Avenue, Ardmore, Pa. 

Coventry, James Russell 86 South Linwood Avenue, Crafton, Pa. 

Cox, John Calvin 55 Woodland Road, Maplewood, N. J. 

Cranin, Abraham Norman 2120 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Darling, Wells Anderson 141 Hillard Avenue, Bronxville, N. Y. 

Davis, Lawrence Lee 419 Horner Street, Ebensburg, Pa. 

Decker, John Paul 293 Sandford Street, New Brunswick, N. J. 

DeVeer, John Anton ^2 Meritoria Drive, East Williston, N. Y. 

Diliberto, Anthony Charles 5S~39 84th Street, Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Dinger, John P 9550 1 13th Street, Richmond Hill 19, N. Y. 

Donaldson, William Raymond 2202 Glenwood Road, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dorney, Michael E ^ East Clay Avenue, Roselle Park, N. J. 

Downey, William Wallace 176 Summit Avenue, Montclair, N. J. 

Ehmann, Preston Earl 2282 Lyde Place, Scotch Plains, N. J. 

Faccioli, Egist Edward 294 South Broadway, Nyack, N. Y. 

Felton, William John 210 Chestnut Street, Roselle Park, N. J. 

Fisenne, Charles Anthony 40 East 83 Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fishman, Alvin 1348 West Sixth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Flanagan, Philbin Stephen 378 Charlton Avenue, South Orange, N. J. 

Flinn, John Gordon Arch Street, Ogdensburg, N. J. 

Foy, Joseph Leo 59 Rosemont Avenue, East Paterson, N. J. 

Friedman, Daniel 2701 Bayswater Avenue, Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

Garelle, John Middle Road, Mattituck, N. Y. 

Gilbert, Wilmer R., Jr 44 Crescent Place, Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Gillcrist, James Albert 52 Porterfield Place, Freeport, N. Y. 

Gillen, William B 8206 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn 9, N. Y. 



138 Bethany College Bulletin 

Giulianelli, August 64-58 Austin Street, Forest Hills, N. Y 

Glasgow, William H 697 Springdale Avenue, East Orange, N. J 

Goff, Michael Harper 1025 North Main Street, West Hartford, Conn 

Greacen, John A 47 Montrose Road, Scarsdale, N. Y 

Hahn, Thomas George 69 Pearl Avenue, Oil City, Pa 

Haldeman, Harry Davis, Jr 200 East California Avenue, Pleasantville, N. J 

Heckman, Robert Rowe Liberty Center, Ind 

Hendrian, Marshall Dexter 105 Ridgewood Avenue, Glen Ridge, N. J 

Higson, John Reynolds 46 Grandview Avenue, White Plains, N. Y 

'Hogan, Joseph Patrick 229 Stewart Avenue, Kearny, N. J 

Hollod, George Hyre 481 Morris Avenue, Summit, N. J 

Hopkins, John E 484 Jackson Street, Willimantic, Conn 

Housepian, Edgar M 600 West 1 16th Street, New York, N. Y 

Hower, Floyd E., Jr 1316 Myrtle Street, Scranton 10, Pa 

Jaeger, Frank Hubert I 3~4 I Second Street, Fair Lawn, N. J 

Jasinski, Robert Adam Chrystal Street, Dover, N. J 

Johnson, Arthur Craig 49 Rector Street, Metuchen, N. J 

Jolly, Richard Neal Box 134, Rome City, Ind 

Jones, David Stowell 122 Kipp Avenue, Hasbrouck Heights, N. J 

Jordan, Thomas W., Jr 105 Westover Place, West New York, N. J 

Judd, Robert Harrison 168 Washington Street, New Britain, Conn 

Kelley, David Dessler, Jr 416 East Walton Avenue, Altoona, Pa 

Kelly, Thomas Donald 1345 Plimpton Avenue, Bronx, N. Y 

Kercsmar, John 601 Laufer Avenue, Bethlehem, Pa 

Kirschner, Stanley 717 East 88 Street, Brooklyn, 12, N. Y 

Klos, John Thomas 101 Carpenter Street, Belleville, N. J 

Kober, Albert Michael Fairview Avenue, Chalfont, Pa 

Krafte, Conrad W 24 Laventhal Avenue, Irvington, N. J 

Kudlick, Raymond E 2050 Pleasant Parkway, Union, N. J 

Kuras, Raymond E 81 East 25th Street, Bayonne, N. J 

Lang, Elliot Richard 1800 East 18th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Leahy, Edward Francis 818 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Lenahan, Charles B 72 Yeager Avenue, Forty-Fort, Pa 

Lenz, Robert Gerard 34 _ 33 62nd Street, Woodside, New York, N. Y 

Love, Isaac Douglas 2 Spencer Road, Glen Ridge, N. J 

Madsen, Norman Oscar 1624 Prospect Avenue, Plainfield, N. J 

Malcolm, Allen Rufus 71 1 North Overlook Drive, Alexandria, Pa 

Manasse, Martin 26 East 81st Street, New York 28, N. Y 

Mapletoft, John Thomas 107 Burchard Avenue, East Orange, N. J 

Mastras, Paul 194 East Main Street, Middletown, Conn 

Mawha, Donald B 256 Dunnell Road, Maplewood, N. J 

May, Richard Dees 240 South Marshall Street, Hartford, Conn 

Mayer, George C, Jr 610 Hillcrest Road, Ridgewood, N. J 

Melhuish, James L 85 Carteret Street, Glen Ridge, N. J 

Meredith, Samuel R., Jr 26 Fenimore Road, Scarsdale, N. Y 

Michaels, George E 834 State Street, Curwensville, Pa 

Minium, Merrill R.F.D. 3, Lewisburg, Pa 

Mitchell, John Henry 1 East Palisade Avenue, Englewood, N. J 



Bethany College Bulletin 139 

Morris, David Bell 115-92 225 Street, St. Albans II, N. Y. 

McDaniel, Harry C 131 Edgewood Avenue, Pittsburgh 1 8, Pa. 

McDowell, George Edward 10 Hathaway Lane, Verona, N. J. 

Newburger, James Morton Prospect Road, Westport, Conn. 

Nolt, Franklin Erwin Landis Street, Coopersburg, Pa. 

Nordlinger, Louis Maurice Sherman Avenue, Hawthorne, N. Y. 

Nott, Howard Odell, Jr 18 McDowell Place, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Paul, George Leonard 8 Woodland Place, Great Neck, N. Y. 

Peplau, Milton Lester 90 Greenwood Street, New Britain, Conn. 

Price, Frank E 926 West 28th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Pruden, John Eugene Route 1, Hartford City, Ind. 

Pruett, Edward John Terrace Drive, Nyack, N. Y. 

Ranger, James Brightman 1522 Windrew Avenue, South Plainfield, N. J. 

Richards, George C 109 Franklin Street, East Rockaway, N. Y. 

Robertson, George D 175 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, N. J. 

Rogers, John M I 37 _I 5 2 33 r d Street, Laurelton, 10, L. I., N. Y. 

Rose, Ronald H Route 1, Angola, Ind. 

Ryan, John Joseph III 100 Everit Avenue, Hewlett, N. Y. 

Salt, Alfred Lewis 43 Central Avenue, Hasbrouck Heights, N. J. 

Sanner, Joseph Jacob 3$$ West 26th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Scheu, Lawrence Daniel, Jr Barberry Lane, Sea Cliff, N. Y. 

Schmidt, Richard M Route 5, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Schuck, Christian Alfred 35 Earley Street, City Island, N. Y. 

Smith, Harry Herbert, Jr 1 103 Dewey Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Spieldenner, Frank Edward 117 Sunset Lane, Tenafly, N. J. 

Stambaugh, James Robert 1238 Maxine Drive, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Thomas, David George 1 Parkridge Drive, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Townsend, Stanley W Box 213, Custer City, Pa. 

Vagianos, Nicholas John 509 West 189 Street, New York 33 t N. Y. 

Van Vliet, Lloyd George 148 Magnolia Avenue, Tenafly, N. J. 

Walter, Arthur Edwin 66 Barbara Street, Newark, N. J. 

Warman, Saron Stillwell 1609 Adam Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

Watkins, Stuart R 562 West High Street, Painted Post, N. Y. 

Wentworth, Thomas Foote, Jr 65 Second Street, Garden City, L. I., N. Y. 

Wilbor, Thomas W., Jr Pear Tree Point Road, Noroton, Conn. 

Wilcox, Richard Jay 811 Cedar Terrace, Westfield, N. J. 

Wilde, Wilson 17 Cumberland Road, West Hartford, Conn. 

Woodbury, Kyle Harry 33 Eldorado Place, Weehawken, N. J. 

Yaswen, Chester Edward 31-48 29th Street, Astoria, N. Y. 

Yeomans, Robert K 121 South Park Avenue, Rockville Center, N. Y. 

Young, Arthur W., Jr 144-30 72 Drive, Flushing, N. Y. 

Zaghi, John Paul 1426 Crosby Avenue, New York 61, N. Y. 

Zahn, Walter A 22 Howard Avenue, New Hyde Park, N. Y. 

Zaimes, George 1541 Rosedale Avenue, New York 60, N. Y. 



140 Bethany College Bulletin 

SUMMER TERM 1945 

Enrollment by Classes 

Men Women Total 

Senior 1 2 3 

Junior 2 3 5 

Sophomore 3 4 7 

Freshman 18 11 29 

Unclassified o 1 1 

Total 24 21 45 

Enrollment by States 

New Jersey 6 

New York 9 

Ohio 8 

Pennsylvania 5 

West Virginia 17 

Total 45 

SUMMER SEMESTER 1945 

Navy V-12 Enrollment 

Total Navy Students 136 

Enrollment by States 

Connecticut 12 

Indiana 8 

Kansas 1 

Massachusetts 1 

New Jersey 45 

New York 46 

Pennsylvania 22 

Virginia 1 

Total 136 



ROSTER OF STUDENTS 

i 945-1 946 
Seniors 

Alexander, Jeanne R.F.D. 1, Turtle Creek, Pa. 

Brinkworth, Donald 914 Vickroy Avenue, Johnstown, Pa. 

Brooke, Eleanor 528 Hugart Street, Confluence, Pa. 

Bryan, Evelyn 804 Market Street, Toronto, Ohio 

Coldren, Phyllis Miles 116 Moore Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Coners, Margaret 40 Oakland Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Conn, Archie R.F.D. 1, Point Marion, Pa. 

d'Aliberti, Alfred Park Street, Steubenville, Ohio 

Drum, James R.F.D. 4, Bethlehem, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Ellis, Jean 1318 Virginia Street, Moundsville, W. Va. 

Flint, Janet Harrington Park, N. J. 

Fowler, Jean 45 Union Avenue, Lynbrook, L. I., N. Y. 

Gallagher, Doris 148 37th Street, Union City, N. J. 

Gibson, Gladys Bethany, W. Va. 

Gilbert, Pauline 29 Ridgewood Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Harvey, Carolyn 1806 Charles Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Houghton, Winifred Middlebourne, W. Va. 

Humphrey, Shirley Main Street, Tiltonsville, Ohio 

Jameson, Lois 73 Koster Row, Eggertsville, N. Y. 

Jewell, Richard Belleview Heights, Bellaire, Ohio 

Jones, Katherine 301 Hazel Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Kammen, Harold 212 West 85th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Kenny, Benjamin 850 Country Club Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Kerfoot, Frances 5 Lebanon Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Lazear, Isa 1600 Denniston Avenue, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

Marron, Lorraine 30 Crescent Avenue, Babylon, N. Y. 

Michaels, Rhoda East Chatteau, Woodmere Blvd., New York, N. Y. 

Monczynski, Dorothy 121 Easton Avenue, Buffalo 15, N. Y. 

McMullen, Jane 10th and Franklin Avenues, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Opie, Martha 1540 Asbury Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Phillips, Irving 1677 Weston Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio 

Pletz, Clayton 478 Reno Street, Rochester, Pa. 

Rankin, Janet 1510 Vance Avenue, Coraopolis, Pa. 

Repp, Frances R.F.D. 2, New Kensington, Pa. 

Roberts, June Crawford Bethany, W. Va. 

Roberts, Richard Bethany, W. Va. 

Rose, Barbara Kate 511 South Niagara Street, Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Saeltzer, Doris 219 Bronx River Road, Yonkers 4, N. Y. 

Sembower, James 30 Oakland Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Stuart, Mary 107 Fahnestock Road, Aspinwall, Pa. 

Taylor, Jeanne 265 Rye Beach Avenue, Rye, N. Y. 

Teater, Marjorie 130 South Park Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 



142 Bethany College Bulletin 

Truxal, Louise Manor, Pa. 

Waugh, Patricia Washington Pike, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Weinrich, Marcel 1434 Morris Avenue, Bronx $6 y N. Y. 

Wilson, Joan 519 Tenth Street, Moundsville, W. Va. 

Winski, Marjorie 191 5 Main Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Wolfe, Virginia Perry 501 Duquesne Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Woodhouse, Betty R.F.D. 1, New Milford, Ohio 

Young, William 810 Commerce Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Juniors 

Ammon, Emma Lou 4 America Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Burrows, Helyn Louise 179 Kinderkamock Road, Westwood, N. J. 

Burtis, Evelyn 322 Cedar Boulevard, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Capizzi, Anthony 6807 Tenth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Carlino, Leo Thomas 1819 83rd Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Copenhaver, Edward Bethany, W. Va. 

Davidson, Marjorie 347 East Liberty Street, Girard, Ohio 

Dumbaugh, William 3904 Palisade Drive, Hollidays Cove, W. Va. 

Fagan, Patricia 500 West End Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Flaherty, Margaret 44 Sheridan Avenue, Bellevue, Pa. 

Fletcher, Louise Highland Park, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Fowler, Julia 45 Union Avenue, Lynbrook, L. I., N. Y. 

Frisch, Alan 54 Evelyn Place, New York, N. Y. 

Furber, Dorothea 3633 Burlington Avenue N., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Germon, Sara R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Gibbons, Rita 1294 West 102 Street, Cleveland, Ohio 

Gordon, Mary Jo 125 Linden Avenue, Pittsburgh 18, Pa. 

Gutierrez, Josephine Garcia 134 Eleanor Street, Langeloth, Pa. 

Hueston, Robert Mannington, W. Va. 

Kallman, Burton 31605 Fairmont Street, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Laughner, Arthur 1025 Indiana Avenue, Monaca, Pa. 

Loose, Pauline Leesport, Pa. 

Loposer, Carolyn Parker n8£ Marietta Street, St. Clairsville, Ohio 

Mikels, Beverly 318 Sumner Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Myers, Harold E 235 Metz Avenue, Akron, Ohio 

Myers, Walter L Snug Harbor, Steubenville, Ohio 

MacPherson, James 1601 Main Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Nawotka, Amelia 23 Sherman Street, Buffalo 6, N. Y. 

Neff, Barbara Todd Lane, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

Neumeister, Alice 345 Washington Boulevard, Orrville, Ohio 

Ornold, Joyce 517 North Front Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Pinney, Alma Jean 17 Blackman Avenue, Bethel, Conn. 

Pushkarow, Dorothy 231 49th Street, Union City, N. J. 

Risberg, Marjorie 11 118 Clifton Road, Cleveland, Ohio 

Rogers, Elaine 527 Chestnut Street, Scottdale, Pa. 

Rowland, Dorothy 527 Midland Avenue, Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

Santiago, Edna 733 Kelly Street, New York $$, N. Y. 



Bethany College Bulletin 143 

Schoonmaker, Lois 717 Grove Place, Toledo, Ohio 

Scott, Norma Jean Rogersville, Pa. 

Shaffer, Joan 473 Carnegie Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Shoemaker, Virginia Sylvan Place, Haworth, N. J. 

Slobodkin, Lawrence 106 West 69th Street, New York 23, N. Y. 

Smith, Robert J 360 Franklin Street, Marion, Ohio 

Stevenson, Altha R.F.D. 4, McDonald, Pa. 

Vogt, Shirley 29 South Willow Street, East Aurora, N. Y. 

Weimer, John Bethany, W. Va. 

Wells, Arthur Newell, W. Va. 

Wilson, Ira J 714 Idlewood Avenue, East Carnegie, Pa. 

Wright, Jack Allen Cedar Tree Lane, Wire Mill Road, Stamford, Conn. 

Zettler, Howard 103 Nichols Avenue, Norwood, Mass. 

Sophomores 

Allen, Patricia 608 Greendale Avenue, Edgewood, Pa. 

Ames, Dorothea 27 Norma Place, Buffalo 14, N. Y. 

Anderson, Peggy 395 Park Avenue W., Apt. 4, Mansfield, Ohio 

Angelis, James 6 Woodlawn Court, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Aull, Helen 403 Union Avenue, Ingram, Pa. 

Baldwin, Constance 104 Bixley Heath, Lynbrook, L. I., N. Y. 

Baumgarten, Irene 511 West 113th Street, New York 25, N. Y. 

Beggs, William 519 Oden Street, Confluence, Pa. 

Bell, Anna Marie Box 346, R.F.D. 1, McKeesport, Pa. 

Belli, Florence in Bergen Avenue, Clifton, N. J. 

Bendler, Pauline 1535 Pingree, Detroit 6, Mich. 

Binder, Mary Elizabeth 227 Main Street, East Rutherford, N. J. 

Bishop, Geraldine 345 East 36th Street, Paterson, N. J. 

Boyd, Joan /. Woodcreek, Spring Valley Road, Huntington, W. Va. 

Brindley, Robert 2824 Chaplain Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Broderick, Patricia 6017 Buffalo Avenue, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Buchanan, Lizabeth Bethlehem, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Burton, Donna 15 Cumberland Road, Glenrock, N. J. 

Butterworth, Betty-Ann 405 Franklin Avenue, Nutley, N. J. 

Byers, Mary Margaret 19 Warden Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Cameron, Lee 300 East Lincoln Avenue, McDonald, Pa. 

Casey, John 6340 Waldron Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Coble, Robert 324 West Main Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Cole, Marjorie 2303 Sunset Avenue, Wanamassa, N. J. 

Cooperrider, Nancy 1401 Highland Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 

Criswell, Charles 151 Valley Boulevard, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Deer, Elva Mae 717 Sherwood Avenue, Pittsburgh 4, Pa. 

Duff, Nancy 1603 Union Avenue, McKeesport, Pa. 

Dunn, Hewitt 104 Commonwealth Avenue, Norfolk, Va. 

Eaton, Aimee 2106 Sunset Boulevard, Steubenville, Ohio 

Eaton, Jane 2106 Sunset Boulevard, Steubenville, Ohio 

Eberhard, Robert 1 502 Hildreth Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va, 



144 Bethany College Bulletin 

Fairbanks, Beverly 88 Stockbridge Road, Yonkers 3, N. Y. 

Ferris, William 21 10 Jacob Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Flagg, Duane 105 South Pine Street, Ellensburg, Wash. 

Flood, Ruth Ann 436 West 38th Street, Ashtabula, Ohio 

Galm, Edna 58 Elm Avenue, Floral Park, L. I., N. Y. 

Garner, Eleanor Bethany, W. Va. 

Gillis, Elizabeth West Lake, North Branford, Conn. 

Gottlieb, Betty 1555 Grand Concourse, New York 52, N. Y. 

Gottlieb, Stuart Hotel Broadmoor, 102nd Street and Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Greenfield, Lila Nan 975 Walton Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Grismer, Elizabeth 15328 Stahelin, Detroit 23, Mich. 

Grove, Dorothy 3026 Broad Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 

Hagman, Louise 435 East 66th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 

Haley, Joan 201 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Halley, Vivian 239 86th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hallock, Helen Akron Road, Medina, Ohio 

Haney, Jean 450 Riverside Drive, New York 27, N. Y. 

Harner, Anne 811 Vine Street, Versailles Boro, McKeesport, Pa. 

Harrison, Esther North Street, North Branford, Conn. 

Henne, Margaret 311 22nd Street N.W., Canton, Ohio 

Henry, Kenneth 616 Main Street, Bridgeport, Ohio 

Hilf, Dorothy 274 Beverly Road, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Hixson, Barbara 324 Orchard Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Huntsberger, Marjorie 630 Mt. Laurel Avenue, Temple, Pa. 

Jeffries, Virginia 221 Hilands Avenue, Ben Avon, Pa. 

Jones, Betty G 1608 Lee Avenue, McKeesport, Pa. 

Jordan, Jeanne 1296 Kensington Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Karavanic, Violet c/o Old Oak Inn, Weirton, W. Va. 

Keckley, Beryl Ann 970 Mt. Vernon Road, Newark, Ohio 

Keller, Marjorie 2144 Marshall Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Kenny, Nancy 850 Country Club Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Koon, Eileen 1701 Morgan town Avenue, Fairmont, W. Va. 

Kuntze, Naomi 201 9 Green Avenue, Ridgewood, N. Y. 

Kurtz, Raymond D 7 West 96th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Lee, Elizabeth 49 Park Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J. 

Long, Doris Jean Pine Grove, W. Va. 

Marmoci, Norma 100 Lefferts Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Martin, Mary Jo White Chapel Road, Newark, Ohio 

Maynard, Beverly 19312 Birwood Avenue, Detroit 21, Mich. 

Meyer, William 6034 Biarritz Drive, Normandy Isle, Miami Beach, Fla. 

Moody, Antoinette 43 Balmiere Parkway, Cranford, N. J. 

McFadden, Estella Bethany, W. Va. 

Newman, Jay 45 Christopher Street, New York 14, N. Y. 

Orthey, Eugenia 5218 Amboy Road, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Palmer, Kathryn 58 Dewey Avenue, Newark, Ohio 

Pease, Mary Lois S35 Broad Street, Wadsworth, Ohio 

Pendleton, Ruth 217 North Verona Avenue, Avon Park, Fla. 

Pierson, Marilyn 897 East Broad Street, Westfield, N. J. 



Bethany College Bulletin 145 

Pinter, Gloria 31 Tenafly Road, Englewood, N. J. 

Poole, Margaret 481 1 Browvale Drive, Littleneck, N. Y. 

Pustilnik, Seymour 1660 Crotona Park, New York 60, N, Y. 

Quade, Albert Boyden Road, Macedonia, Ohio 

Quen, Jacques 1064 Carroll Place, Bronx $6, N. Y. 

Radulovic, Mildred 3 X °7 Auberle Street, McKeesport, Pa. 

Renner, Robert 1259 Oakridge Drive, Cleveland Heights 21, Ohio 

Reynolds, Marie 72 Baldwin Place, Bloomfield, N. J. 

Rodefer, Charles 102 North Porter Street, Waynesburg, Pa. 

Rohlf, Eleanor 803 Ninth Street, S.W., Massillon, Ohio 

Russo, Frances 642 Esplanade, Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Savage, David 206 Fifth Avenue, McKeesport, Pa. 

Schlanger, Gladys 215 East Gunhill Road, New York 67, N. Y. 

Sesler, Jeffrey Ann 308 Morgantown Street, Uniontown, Pa. 

Sheline, Robert 3738 Stannard Drive, Toledo, Ohio 

Silcock, Phillip 12 East Main Street, Carnegie, Pa. 

Sims, Leonard 7 Metropolitan Oval, Bronx 62, N. Y. 

Simson, Harold 156 Delaware Street, Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Sklar, Jordan 1106 Morris Avenue, New York $6, N. Y. 

Smith, Jo Ann 626 West 44th Street, Ashtabula, Ohio 

Smith, J. Robert 647 Cove Road, Hollidays Cove, W. Va. 

Smith, Marilyn Rudolph, Ohio 

Stanton, Eleanor 465 West 23rd Street, Apt. 3-E, New York, N. Y. 

Steffy, Jane 532 Maple Avenue, Trenton, N. J. 

Steinmann, Edwin 122 Euclid Avenue, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Strehan, Margaret 100 Palmer Place, Leonia, N. J. 

Stricklin, Alma Box 45, Triadelphia, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Tate, Ralph 1594 Corporation Street, Beaver, Pa. 

Trail, Karolyn 104 Freeman Street, Beckley, W. Va. 

Turnamian, Virginia 4528 Hudson Avenue, Union City, N. J. 

Umbel, Forrest Kay R.F.D., Uniontown, Pa. 

Unger, Barbara 345 East 58th Street, New York 22, N. Y. 

Unsworth, Edith 3534 84th Street, Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Wade, Elaine 7 Steele Avenue, Brownsville, Pa. 

Walter, Gail 910 North Tenth Street, Cambridge, Ohio 

Weimer, Alexander Bethany, W. Va. 

Weser, Emma Lou R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

White, Virginia 1010 Michigan Avenue, Maumee, Ohio 

Wohrley, Melville. Box 791, Newark, Ohio 

Yochem, Nancy 1216 Eoff Street, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Freshmen 

Afflerbach, H. Robert 1017 Main Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Allison, Lawrence Salineville, Ohio 

Antila, Eric 3836 Marlamount, Hollidays Cove, W. Va. 

Antonotf, Elaine 3973 65th Street, Woodside, N. Y, 

Arbog?.st, Clyde R.F.D, 2, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Avery Helen 19 Westover Avenue, Caldwell, N. J. 



146 Bethany College Bulletin 

Ayers, Jeanne 74 Hawthorne Terrace, Leonia, N. J. 

Bado, George R.F.D. 2, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Baldwin, Joan ' 284 East Euclid Street, Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Bane, Helen 169 Main Street, Cameron, W. Va. 

Barnwell, Mary 46 Pond Road, Great Neck, N. Y. 

Beard, Donald Box 25, Follansbee, W. Va. 

Becker, Walter 10518 29th Avenue, East Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Beglinger, June 1008 Chartiers Avenue, Pittsburgh 20, Pa. 

Benter, Edward 300 Amber Street, Pittsburgh 6, Pa. 

Bierau, Beatricia 8 Wynmor Road, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Black, Carl R.F.D. 2, Box 507A, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Boettcher, Barbara Bethany, W. Va. 

Botchman, Allan 312 Main Street, White Plains, N. Y. 

Bowman, George 15064 Tracey Street, Detroit, Mich. 

Boyd, Robert S 85 Parkway Road, Bronxville, N. Y. 

Brahier, Ella Marie 129 West Broadway, Maumee, Ohio 

Bricker, Herbert 36-20 Parsons Boulevard, Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

Brown, William 105-23 Washington Avenue, Rockaway Beach, N. Y. 

Brownlee, Jeanette R.F.D. 1, Avella, Pa. 

Burrell, Muriel 149 North Main Street, Washington, Pa. 

Burton, William 1416 Third Street, Moundsville, W. Va. 

Bush, Alice 40 Cherry Place, Hillsdale, N. J. 

Byhanna, Betty Bethany, W. Va. 

Calvarese, Evelyn 864 Highland Avenue, Follansbee, W. Va. 

Cameron, Crawford Bethany, W. Va. 

Campbell, Lois Brilliant, Ohio 

Carman, Martha Kathleen 1224 Charles Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Carter, Reed 696 Beech Street, Washington, Pa. 

Christensen, Irene Lake Trail East, Packanack Lake, N. J. 

Churchman, Edwin R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Clark, Jack R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Clink, Anna Box 523, Water Street, Smithfield, Pa. 

Coe, Austin 820 Wallace Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Collier, Charlotte Smithfield, Pa. 

Cooney, Joan Doris Liberty Court, Hempstead, N. Y. 

Corba, William 115 Court Street, Carnegie, Pa. 

Cosby, Donald .4007 Washington Street, Hollidays Cove, W. Va. 

Cottington, Malcolm 935 Ocean View Drive, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Dasch, Clement 1132 Oregon Avenue, Steubenville, Ohio 

Davis, Rose Ann R.F.D. 5, Somerest, Pa. 

Deem, Homer L 2307 Plum Street, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Dewey, Helen 1620 State Avenue, Coraopolis, Pa. 

DiFabbio, Michael 84 27th Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Dilba, Carol Ridgewood Road, Westwood, N. J. 

Dillman, Ann 13255 Highland Road, R.R. 4, Miltord, Mich. 

Dimmit, Howard 773 Ohio Street, Follansbee. W. Va. 

Don, Elizabeth 218 West End Avenue, Ridgewood, N. J. 

Drake, Carol 24-40 42nd Street, Long Island City 3, N. Y. 



Bethany College Bulletin 147 

Duncan, Annabel 815 Riverside Avenue, Wellsville, Ohio 

Edmonds, Virginia 345 Hamill Road, Verona, Pa. 

Egeland, June 33 West 63 Street, New York, N. Y. 

Elsas, Richard 607 Carnegie Street, Steubenville, Ohio 

Ertle, Ruth Avella Heights, Avella, Pa. 

Esaias, Esther Star Route, Canton, Pa. 

Evans, Thomas 615 Gormley Avenue, Carnegie, Pa. 

Fair, Richard Bethany, W. Va. 

Fallon, Mary 7410 Ridge Boulevard, Brooklyn 9, N. Y. 

Farmer, Alonzo 21 13 Commerce Street, Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Ferguson, Robert 392 Hazel Drive, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Fink, Norma 31 Irving Place, Baldwin, N. Y. 

Fitch, Lucille West 23rd Street, Bellaire, Ohio 

Flemming, Ruth Ellen R.F.D. 3, Box 122-A, Uniontown, Pa. 

Franklin, Nancy 632 Quebec Place, N.W., Washington, D.C. 

Franz, Sigfield 12468 Barlow, Detroit 5, Mich. 

Gainor, Belle 913 Weyls Terrace, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Gallas, James Mozart, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Gatto, Joseph Box 136, Harris Road, Bedford Hills, N.Y. 

Gibson, Thomas Enville, Tenn. 

Golbey, Donald 253 Stuyvesant Avenue, Brooklyn 21, N.Y. 

Goodspeed, Carolyn 18200 Oak Drive, Detroit, Mich. 

Goodwin, Claude Bethany, W.Va. 

Goodwin, Laura Jo 624 Cove Road, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Green, Lois 43 Higgins Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Grekila, Richard 3458 Central Avenue, Shadyside, Ohio 

Grizzell, Karl 632 North Third Street, Toronto, Ohio 

Grizzell, Karolyn 632 North Third Street, Toronto, Ohio 

Hafer, Ross 438 North Erie, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Haines, Gertrude 17 Brookfield Place, Pleasantville, N.Y. 

Hall, Carolyn 380 Elm Avenue, Rahway, NJ. 

Hamerschlag, Allen 211 West 179 Street, New York $3, N.Y. 

Harris, Donald 3724 Tallman Avenue, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Haskins, Stanley 151 Gardner Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Haught, Ruth 41 North Avenue, Cameron, W.Va. 

Hazen, Janet 435 Avenue D., Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 

Henderson, James Waynesburg Pike, Moundsville, W.Va. 

Henry, Marilyn 653 Linwood Avenue, Ridgewood, N.J. 

Hoag, William 1509 Walnut Street, Pittsburgh 18, Pa. 

Hohmann, Lois Box 1564, Balboa, Canal Zone 

' Holmsten, Carolyn 15505 Tuller Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Hossenlopp, Richard 43 Northumberland Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Hueston, Lydia 1238 Hiland Avenue, Coraopolis, Pa. 

Husni, Violet no Shippen Street, Weehawken, NJ. 

Ilvento, Peter 927 West Side Avenue, Jersey City, NJ. 

Imburgia, Rose Marie 45 Fox Boulevard, Merrick, L.I., N.Y. 

Ingber, Montague 11 97 Anderson Avenue, New York, N.Y. 

Jobes, Alvin 68 Oakland Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 



148 Bethany College Bulletin 

Jones, Gwena Mae 3851 Short Street, Shadyside, Ohio 

Jones, William R.F.D. 1, Eighty-Four, Pa. 

Kamhi, Ralph 1212 Grand Concourse, Bronx 56, N.Y. 

Kanrich, Saul Andrew 1 1 12 Park Avenue, New York 28, N.Y. 

Kehn, Betty 13 Prospect Street, Williston Park, N.Y. 

Keith, Jane 64 Otis Avenue, Staten Island 6, N.Y. 

Keith, Wilfred 63 Wall Street, New York 5, N.Y. 

Kindelberger, William 107 Iowa Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Kirner, Elizabeth 517 Montana Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Kleesattel, Robert 23 East Fairview Avenue, Dayton 5, Ohio 

Knoepfel, Dorothy 1637 Paulding Avenue, Bronx, N.Y. 

Kosovec, Dorothy Bavington Road, Burgettstown, Pa. 

Krebs, Robert Box 504, Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada 

Krodel, Rush Allan 1214 Viand Street, Point Pleasant, W.Va. 

Lamble, Dolores 3 Woodland Court, Pleasant Ridge, Mich. 

Lasley, John Henderson, W.Va. 

Lawyer, John 506 South York Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Leach, Frank ' 10 Moller Street, Tenafly, N.J. 

Lehew, Donald 1206 Purdy Avenue, Moundsville, W.Va. 

Levine, Robert 911 Walton Avenue, New York, N.Y. 

Lowton, Virginia 84-23 106th Street, Richmond Hill, N.Y. 

Lucko, Michael 13427 Hasse, Detroit, Mich. 

Ludewig, Doris Jaeger Avenue, Maywood, N.J. 

Lynch, Edward 54 24th Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Macklin, Frank 4812 Water Street, Benwood, W.Va. 

Maley, Charles 19 Fourth Street, Beech Bottom, W.Va. 

Mamakos, Nick 1320 National Road, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Mandakas, Cres 3716 Main Street, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Mandakas, Eleftheria 3716 Main Street, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Manning, Vayle 17603 Ohio Avenue, Detroit 21, Mich. 

Marr, Franklin Americus Hotel, Allentown, Pa. 

Meixell, Mavis 130 Deerfield Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Melchior, Carolyn 33 Church Street, Nutley 10, N.J. 

Melhado, Julian 2059 Washington Avenue, Bronx 57, N.Y. 

Mendiola, Hugo La Punta, Callao, Peru 

Metzger, Albert 1750 Davidson Avenue, New York, N.Y. 

Miller, Marghretta 2064 East 88th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 

Milliken, Robert 685 East Beau Street, Washington, Pa. 

Mitchell, Roderick i35- 2 3 2 3 2 Street, Laurelton, N.Y. 

Mollett, Samuel 1827 Wales Road, Massillon, Ohio 

Montiegel, Ethel 2419 Hess Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Morgan, Felicia Davidson Heights, Box ^6 y Aliquippa, Pa. 

Morgan, Joseph 2517 Hess Avenue, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Morrison, Kenneth 124 North Street, Danbury, Conn. 

Mullaney, Kenneth 14888 Aubrey Street, Detroit 23, Mich. 

Mulstein, Warren 1228 Intervale Avenue, New York 59, N.Y. 

Myers, Howard 163 Sea Cliff Avenue, Sea Cliff, N.Y. 

Myers, Munn D 188 Maple Avenue, Sea Cliff, N.Y. 

Myers, Patricia 109 Maple Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

McAnallen, Victor 413 Franklin Street, Butler, Pa. 



Bethany College Bulletin 149 

McCloy, Howard 641 Howard Street, Brownsville, Pa. 

McConnell, Dorothy 715 Wall Avenue, Cambridge, Ohio 

McFadden, Eugene 1 1 17 Third Avenue, Brockway, Pa. 

McHenry, William Second Street, Chester, W.Va. 

Mcintosh, Kenneth 4145 Washington Street, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Neubauer, Frances 16 Glenwood Drive, Great Neck, New York, N.Y. 

Nevling, Margaret 850 Fifth Avenue, New Kensington, Pa. 

Newman, Joseph 5$ Clinton Place, Bronx $3, N.Y. 

Nottingham, William 371 Norris Avenue, Sharon, Pa. 

Novatt, Melvyn 975 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Otto, William 120 North Linden Avenue, Pittsburgh 18, Pa. 

Pelham, Lillian 31 North Drive, Great Neck, New York, N.Y. 

Persohn, Kenneth R.F.D. 2, Campground Road, Wellsville, Ohio 

Peterson, Jean 347 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, N.J. 

Phillips, Mary Alice Main Street, Hopwood, Pa. 

Pietrzniak, Henry R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Poe, Ruth Ann. 9 Leatherwood Lane, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Potts, Gordon 19 Ark Avenue, Mozart, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Quillen, Margaret Ocean View, Dela. 

Ramsdell, Donn 209 East Pacemont Road, Columbus, Ohio 

Rice, Albert 914 National Road, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Richards, Renee 860 West 181 Street, New York ^3y N.Y. 

Richardson, Russell Bethany, W.Va. 

Rithner, Virginia 332 Commerce Street, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Robinson, Betty Bethany, W.Va. 

Roush, Richard 627 Mahan Avenue, Follansbee, W.Va. 

Santarelli, Pasquale 251 Schuele Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Schrader, Ralph 134 North Park Street, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Schulter, Albert 420 Russelwood Avenue, McKees Rocks, Pa. 

Schwertfeger, Charles Box 43, West Liberty, W.Va. 

Scott, Ella Mae 166 Harper Road, Beckley, W.Va. 

Sel, Barbara 109 Eastview Avenue, Leonia, N.J. 

Shaffer, Carrollton 473 Carnegie Drive, Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 

Shanton, David 1400 West Market Street, Steubenville, Ohio 

Shedkiac, Andrew West Alexander, Pa. 

Shepherd, William 927 National Road, Woodsdale, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Shotynski, Edward 4517 North 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Siegel, Fred 2065 East Eighth Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Slipp, Barbara Ann 385 Hollis Street, Framingham, Mass. 

Smith, Gladys Joy R.F.D. 1, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Smith, Gloria 16522 Inverness Avenue, Detroit 21, Mich. 

Smith, Jeanne 13 125 Cloverlawn, Detroit, Mich. 

Smith, Robert B North Bedford Road, Bedford Hills, N.Y. 

Smith, Shirley 360 Franklin Street, Marion, Ohio 

Solkiewicz, Lucille 7202 Fullerton Avenue, Cleveland, 5, Ohio 

Starling, Robert 201 Jonquil Place, Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

Stear, Mary Ruth 2313 Hall Road, Independence, Mo. 

Steckler, Stanley 2180 Wallace Avenue, New York, N.Y. 

Stoolfire, Genevieve North Liberty, West Alexander, Pa. 

Strong, Marilyn Kay 10 West 6$ Street, New York 23, N.Y. 



150 Bethany College Bulletin 

Strouse, Evelyn 25 Grove Street, Baldwin, N.Y. 

Sturm, Alan W 189-02 1 13 Avenue, St. Albans, N.Y. 

Tarpinian, Alexander 653 Vanderbilt Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Taylor, Charles Park Place, Chester, W.Va. 

Thiede, Evelyn 425 Tremont Avenue, Westfield, NJ. 

Thomas, Albert 105 Sixth Street, Point Pleasant, W.Va. 

Thompson, Margaret 701 Highland Avenue, Princeton, W.Va. 

Trainer, Vincent 209 30th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Trenbick, Joseph 1220 Martin Avenue, New Kensington, Pa. 

Treves, Alexander 135 Central Park West, New York, N.Y. 

Treves, Edward 135 Central Park West, New York, N.Y. 

Tucker, Dorothy 41 Reynen Court, Ridgewood, NJ. 

Turley, Richard 4218 Broadway, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Varlas, Mike 208 Birch Avenue, Moundsville, W.Va. 

Veith, Phillip Box 384, Steubenville, Ohio 

Velasco, Fernando 1701 Miller, Lima, Peru 

Vujnovic, John 3708 Tallman Avenue, Hollidays Cove, W.Va. 

Wallace, Margaret R.F.D. 2, New Brighton, Pa. 

Wallin, Ralph 215 West Woodland, Ferndale, Mich. 

Warshaw, Jerome 70 Lenox Road, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Weaver, Lois 106 Park Street, Scottdale, Pa. 

Webb, Renee 322 West 107th Street, New York 25, N.Y. 

Weissman, Ruth 1940 Andrews Avenue, New York 52) N.Y. 

Wells, Naomi Ridge Avenue, New Cumberland, W.Va. 

Wells, Robert Newell, W.Va. 

Wester, Betty-Jane 19 Yale Street, Maplewood, NJ. 

Whitman, Nancy 50 Ruskin Road, Eggertsville, N.Y. 

Wiant, Dale 402 Maple Place, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

Winowich, Nicholas 2621 Carey Way, Pittsburgh 3, Pa. 

Winski, Charlotte 1715 Main Street, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Wolfe, Harry 67 Eighth Street, Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Wolfe, Henry 3449 Elk Avenue, Shadyside, Ohio 

Woolery, Nancy Bethany, W.Va. 

Worth, Wanda R.F.D. 1, Hebron, Ohio 

Worthington, Cicely Box 416, Amsterdam, Ohio 

Wujciak, Jacqueline 3018 Nulberry Street, Toledo, Ohio 

Wyckoff, Frances 94 North Main Street, Perry, N.Y. 

Yaney, Joyce 31 Brinkerhoff Avenue, Teaneck, N J. 

Zuckerman, Marvin 11 10 Anderson Avenue, Bronx 52, N.Y. 

Unclassified Students 

Baum, Dorothy Bethany, W.Va. 

Boughner, C. R Bethany, W.Va. 

Carrigan, Margaret Bethany, W.Va. 

Dodd, Jean Brilliant, Ohio 

Green, George Bethany, W.Va. 

Hinds, Ruby West Alexander, Pa. 

Hinds, William West Alexander, Pa. 

Markley, Shirley Bethany, W.Va. 



Bethany College Bulletin 151 

Myers, Nancy Snug Harbor, Steubenville, Ohio 

McBride, Patricia 900 Fourth Street, Beaver, Pa. 

McLean, Daniel Bethany, W.Va. 

Pilchard, Robert Bethany, W.Va. 

Sumpstine, Patricia Bethany, W.Va. 

White, Glen Bethany, W.Va. 

Woolery, Margaret Bethany, W.Va. 

Post-Graduate Students 

Golden, Helen 2201 Richland Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Wolf, Don E 1504 Hildreth Avenue, Wheeling, W.Va. 



Enrollment by Classes 

Men Women Total 

Senior 13 37 50 

Junior 18 32 50 

Sophomore 23 87 120 

Freshman 131 no 241 

Unclassified 6 9 15 

Post-graduate 1 1 2 

Total 202 276 478 

Enrollment by States and Foreign Countries 

California 1 

Canal Zone 1 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 1 

Florida 3 

Hawaii 1 

Indiana 1 

Massachusetts 3 

Michigan 15 

Missouri 1 

New Jersey 39 

New York 108 

Ohio 63 

Ontario, Canada 1 

Pennsylvania 103 

Peru 2 

Tennessee 1 

Virginia 1 

Washington 1 

West Virginia 125 

Total 478 






BEQUESTS 

Gifts to the college may take the form of lectureships, of scholarships, of professorships, 
of additions to the material equipment, or of contributions to the permanent endowment 
fund or the current expense fund of the college. Special conditions may, of course, be 
attached to any gift. Forms of bequests are suggested as follows: 

A. UNRESTRICTED BEQUEST 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation 
established by law at Bethany in the Commonwealth of West Virginia, the sum of 

dollars, to be applied to the general uses and purposes of the said 

institution. 

B. UNRESTRICTED BEQUEST MAKING THE COLLEGE 
RESIDUARY LEGATEE 

All the rest, residue, and remainder of any estate, real and personal, I devise and be- 
queath to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation established by law at Bethany 
in the Commonwealth of West Virginia, to be applied to the general uses and purposes of 
the said institution. 

C. BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT 

I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of the Bethany College, a corporation 
established by law at Bethany in the Commonwealth of West Virginia, the sum of 

dollars to be invested and preserved inviolably for the endowment of 

Bethany College. 



DIRECTORY FOR CORRESPONDENCE 

Accounts and Finance: 



N. W. Evans 
Bursar 

Bethany College 
Bethany, West Virginia 

Admission to the College: 

J. Gerald Patterson 
Director of Admissions 
Bethany College 
Bethany, West Virginia 

Curriculum and Instruction: 

B. R. Weimer 
Dean of the Faculty 
Bethany College 
Bethany, West Virginia 

Student Personnel Administration: 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick 
Dean of Students 
Bethany College 
Bethany, West Virginia 

Student Records and Transcripts: 

Miss Frances Quinlin 
Recorder 
Bethany College 
Bethany, West Virginia 



Telephone: Bethany 2141 



Telephone: Bethany 2172 



Telephone: Bethany 21 51 



Telephone: Bethany 2 131 



Telephone: Bethany 213 1 



INDEX 



Page 

Academic Information 114 

Academic Recognition 3 

Accounts, Payment of 31 

Activities, Student in 

Administration, Officers 10 

Administration, Staff 15 

Admission 21 

Advanced Standing 22 

Advanced Standing by Achievement 

Tests 24 

Evaluation and Registration 24 

Freshman Admission 21 

General Requirements 21 

Method of Enrollment 25 

Placement tests for Freshmen 24 

Reservation of Dormitory Rooms ... 25 

Special Students 24 

Advanced Enrollment 118 

Advanced Standing 22 

Art Appreciation 47 

Bequests, Forms for 152 

Bible 91 

Biology 47 

Board 29 

Board of Trustees 8 

Officers 9 

Committees 9 

Buildings and Grounds 101 

Business Administration 57 

Calendar, College 6, 7 

Chemistry 50 

Church History 93 

Classics 52 

Classification of Students 114 

Comprehensive Examination 40 

Concerts no 

Convocation no 

Degrees 

Conferred 1944-45 I 3 I 

Requirements for 39 

Departments of Instruction 45 

Art Appreciation 47 

Bible 91 



Page 

Biology 47 

Business Administration 57 

Chemistry 50 

Church History 93 

Classics 51 

Economics 54 

Education 59 

English 62 

French 73 

Geography 66 

Geology 66 

German 74 

Greek 52 

History, American 68 

History, European 67 

Homiletics and Religious Education . . 93 

Journalism 64 

Latin 53 

Library Science 70 

Mathematics 70 

Modern Languages 73 

Music 76 

Personnel Administration 79 

Philosophy 80 

Physical Education 82 

Physics 86 

Political Science 69 

Psychology 88 

Religion 90 

Secretarial Studies 59 

Social Science 67 

Sociology 94 

Spanish 75 

Speech and Dramatics 6$ 

Dormitories, Operation of 28 

Directory for Correspondence 153 

Dramatics 113 

Economics and Business Administra- 
tion 54 

Education 59 

Educational Program 123 

Comprehensive Examination 125 

Instruction 123 

Lower Division 124 

Student Guidance 126 



Page 

Upper Division 125 

Endowments 106 

English 61 

Enrollment 

Method of 25 

Summary of 151 

Equipment, Instructional 105 

Examinations 

Comprehensive 40, 125 

Final 117 

Special 117 

Expenses 

Admission Fee 26 

Board 29 

Fees 27 

Freshman Fees 29 

Operation of Dormitories 28 

Payment of Accounts 31 

Room Payment Deposit 26 

Room Rent 27 

Tuition 26 

Faculty of Instruction 11 

Functional Committees of 17 

Fees 27 

Financial Aids 37 

Fraternities 113 

French 73 

Funds, Special 108 

General Information no 

Academic Information 114 

Lectures and Concerts no 

Music and Dramatics 113 

Religious Life no 

Social Regulations 120 

Student Activities ill 

Student Health 119 

Geography 66 

Geology 66 

German 74 

Grading System 114 

Graduation and Honors 39 

Degree Requirements 39 

Honors 41 

Greek 52 

History and Political Science 67 

History and Resources 96 



Page 
Homiletics and Religious Education ... 93 
Honors 41 

Instructional Equipment 105 

Instruction, Departments of 45 

Journalism 64 

Laboratories 105 

Latin S3 

Lectures and Concerts no 

Libraries 103 

Library Science 70 

Library Staff 15 

Location 100 

Lower Division Courses 124 

Married Students, Accommodations 

for 28 

Mathematics 70 

Men's Residence Halls 27 

Cochran Hall 27 

Supplemental Dormitories 27 

Modern Languages 73 

Music 76 

Music and Dramatics 1 13 

Officers of Administration 10 

Operation of Dormitories 28 

Payment of Accounts 31 

Personnel Administration 79 

Philosophy 80 

Physical Education and Health 82 

Physics 86 

Placement 38 

Political Science 69 

Probation 115 

Provisional Enrollment 116 

Psychology 88 

Religion 9° 

Religious Life no 

Requirements 

for Admission 21 

for Degrees 39 

Residences for Women 27 

Room Rent. 27 

Room Reservations 25 



Page 
Roster of Students 135 

Scholarships and Financial Aids 34 

Designated Scholarships 35 

Financial Aids 37 

Freshman Scholarships 34 

Scholarships for Upperclassmen 35 

Secretarial Studies 59 

Social Regulations 120 

Social Science 67 

Sociology 94 

Spanish 75 

Special Examinations 117 

Special Fees 30 

Special Funds 108 

Special Students 24 

Speech and Dramatics 65 

Student Activities in 



Page 

Student Guidance 126 

Student Health 119 

Student Roster 135 

Summer Term Expenses 31 

Transcripts 118 

Trustees, Board of 8 

Committees 9 

Officers 9 

Tuition 26 

Upper Division Courses 1 ; 

Withdrawal 117 

Women's Residence Halls 27 

Dormitory Houses 27 

Gateway Hall 27 

Phillips Hall 27 



Bethany College is a privately governed college of the liberal arts and sciences. It is 
dedicated to high scholarship and Christian character. It derives its income from endow- 
ments, the gifts of its friends, and from student fees. It is not a tax-supported institution. 
Opportunities in great variety confront those who would like to associate themselves with 
the good work of this college. There is need for large additions to the unrestricted endow- 
ment, for scholarships, for lectureships, and for endowed professorships. 



Fees. 
Fi* 



Preliminary Application for Freshman Class 

To secure priority in registration I hereby make application for admission to Bethany 

College for (month) , (year) 

I understand that actual acceptance to Bethany College depends upon my graduation 
from an accredited high school or preparatory school and upon my class rank being in 
the upper half. 

As soon as possible I shall fill out and file the complete application for admission. With 
this blank I am sending the required admission fee of $10.00. 

The application fee of $10.00 is refundable if the applicant is not accepted by the college. 
If the applicant is accepted, and then cancels his application ninety days prior to the open- 
ing of the semester in which he wishes to register and so notifies the Director of Admissions, 
$7.00 of the application fee will be refunded. If cancellation occurs after the above specified 
period, no part of the application fee will be refunded. 

(Signed) 

(Address) 

Church membership or preference 

Nationality Race 

Age Condition of health 

Preparatory or high school attended 

Date of graduation 

Headmaster or principal 

Address of school 



Occupational interest, 
Date 



Send this blank to: 

Director of Admissions 
Bethany College 
Bethany, W.Va. 






ETHANY COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 
1947-1948 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA 
March 1947 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



Vol. XL March, 1947 No. 3 

Entered as second class matter at Bethany Post Office, Bethany, W.Va. 

Published every month except July and August by Bethany College, Bethany, W.Va. 



C ATA L O G U E 

i 9 4 7 - i 9 4 8 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

for 

1 947-1 948 



CHARTERED IN 1840 BY THE STATE OF VIRGINIA 



Bethany College is on the approved list of colleges of 
the Association of American Universities and is accredited by 
the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools as a degree-granting institution. 

Bethany College is a member in good standing of the 
Association of American Colleges and the American Council 
on Education. Bethany College is affiliated with the Board of 
Higher Education of the Disciples of Christ. 

Bethany College is recognized by various state departments 
of education as an institution for the training of teachers. 
Women graduates of Bethany College are eligible to mem- 
bership in the American Association of University Women. 



PART I 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
ADMINISTRATION 
FACULTY 
COMMITTEES 



CALENDAR 1947 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 

S 6 7 8 9 10 


4 
11 






1 










....1234s 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


23456 


7 


8 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


9 10 11 12 13 


14 


15 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


16 17 18 19 20 


21 


22 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


26 27 28 29 30 31 




23 24 25 26 27 


28 




23 24 
30 31 


25 26 27 


28 


29 
















MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


3 


12345 


6 


7 




123 


,1 


s 


1 2 


456789 


10 


8 9 10 11 12 


13 


14 


6 7 


8 9 10 


11 


12 


3456789 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


15 16 17 18 19 


20 


21 


13 14 


IS 16 17 


18 


19 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 


28 


20 21 


22 23 24 


25 


26 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


31 


29 3° 






27 28 


29 30 31 






24 25 26 27 28 29 30 










SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


s 

6 


S M T W T 
1 2 


F 

3 

10 


s 

4 
11 


S M 


T W T 


F 


s 

I 


S M T W T F S 


•• 12345 
7 8 9 10 11 12 


..123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


13 


56789 


2 3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


12 13 14 15 16 


17 


18 


9 10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


14 15 16 17 18 ig 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


19 20 21 22 23 


24 


25 


16 17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 29 30 




26 27 28 29 30 


3i 




23 24 
30 . . 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


28 29 30 31 











CALENDAR 1948 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


3 


12345 


6 


7 


1 


234 


5 


6 




456789 


10 


8 9 10 11 12 


13 


14 


7 8 


9 10 11 


12 


13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


15 16 17 18 19 


20 


21 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


22 23 24 25 26 


27 


28 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


31 


29 






28 29 


30 31 • • 






25 26 27 28 29 30 . . 










MAY 


JUNE 






JULY 


AU GUST 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 




1 


.... 1 2 3 
6 7 8 9 10 


4 

11 


5 

12 




.... 1 


7 


3 


1234567 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


234567 


8 


4 5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 


13 14 15 16 17 


18 


19 


11 12 


13 14 15 


16 


17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 


26 


18 19 


20 21 22 


23 


24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 


27 28 29 30 






25 26 


27 28 29 


30 


31 


29 30 31 


30 31 




























SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T 


F 


S 


S M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 


4 
11 




T 


? 


1 


2 3 4 
9 10 11 


5 

12 


6 


1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


34567 


8 


9 


7 8 


13 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


10 11 12 13 14 


15 


16 


14 15 


16 17 18 


19 


20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


17 18 19 20 21 


22 


23 


21 22 


23 24 25 


26 


27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 




24 25 26 27 28 


29 


30 


28 29 


30 .. .. 






26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 



CALENDAR 

First Semester 
1947 

September 11 and 12, Thursday and Friday — Faculty Seminar. 

September 14 to 18, Sunday to Thursday — Freshman Week. 

September 17, Wednesday — Registration Day — Upperclassmen. 

September 18, Thursday — Registration Day — First semester freshmen. 

September 18, Thursday — 8:00 a.m., Classes begin for upperclassmen. 

September 19, Friday — 8:00 a.m., Classes begin for first semester freshmen. 

November 15, Saturday — Mid-semester grades are issued. 

November 27, Thursday — Thanksgiving, a college holiday. 

November 29, Saturday — Payment of advance enrollment fee to be completed. 

November 29, Saturday — Modern Language Reading Test. 

December 13, Saturday — Advance enrollment for second semester to be completed. 

December 20, Saturday — 12:00 N., Christmas recess begins. 

1948 

January 5, Monday — 8:00 a.m., Christmas recess ends. 

January 26 to 30, Monday to Friday — Final examinations for first semester. 



Second Semester 

February 4 and 5, Wednesday and Thursday — Registration Days for second semester. 

February 6, Friday — 8 :oo a.m., Classes begin for second semester. 

March 24, Wednesday — Mid-semester grades are issued. 

March 25, Thursday — 12:00 N., Easter recess begins. 

April 7, Wednesday — 8 :oo a.m., Easter recess ends. 

April 1 7, Saturday — Payment of advance enrollment fee to be completed. 

April 17, Saturday — Modern Language Reading Test. 

April 30, Friday — Advance enrollment for first semester of next academic year 

to be completed. 
May 24, Monday — Reading period begins for seniors. 
June 4 and 5, Friday and Saturday — Comprehensive Examination for seniors — 

Written part. 
June 7 to 10, Monday to Thursday — Comprehensive Examination for seniors — 

Oral part. 
June 7 to 11, Monday to Friday — Final examinations for second semester. 
June 12, Saturday — Alumni Day. 
June 13, Sunday — 107th Annual Commencement. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1949 

J. C. Morris East Main, Shelby, Ohio 

Alfred E. Wright 101 Ben Lomond Avenue, Uniontown, Pa. 

Dr. J. Park McMullen Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Frank M. Hesse Grant Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Dr. Russell B. Bailey Wheeling- Clinic, Wheeling, W.Va. 

George J. Barthold . .Miners & Mechanics 'Savings & Trust Co., Steubenville, Ohio 

John W. Love 340 Allison Avenue, Washington, Pa. 

Robert McKinney 745 Chrysler Bldg., New York, N.Y. 

Charles E. Palmer Peoples City Bank, McKeesport, Pa. 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1948 

Thomas W. Phillips, Jr Phillips Hall, Butler, Pa. 

John M. Smith 1321 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

*R. A. Balderson Farmers Nat'l Bank Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

John Marshall .Union Trust Bldg., Washington, D.C. 

Robert D. Hurl Shelby Salesbook Company, Shelby, Ohio 

Daniel F. Mullane 202 Kenneth Avenue, Greensburg, Pa. 

Austin V. Wood Board of Trade Bldg., Wheeling, W.Va. 

Thomas E. Millsop Weirton Steel Company, Weirton, W.Va. 

Donald L. Boyd P. O. Box 1240, Huntington, W.Va. 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1947 

W. S. Wilkin Wellsburg, W.Va. 

F. O. Carfer 50 Lincoln Blvd., Kenmore, N.Y. 

Dr. R. R. Renner 12900 Euclid Avenue, E. Cleveland, Ohio 

Sidney C. Porter Box 765, East Liverpool, Ohio 

Rev. A. Dale Fiers 3331 Bradford Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Maynard L. Patton 35 Cliffview, Fort Thomas, Ky. 

Roy S. Adkins 653 Ridgewood Avenue, Upper Montclair, N.J. 

Dr. Walter W. Tilock 629 Broadway, Lorain, Ohio 

Frank P. Jones Columbian Carbon Co., 41 E. 42nd St., New York, N.Y. 

Faculty Representative for 1 947-1 948: Professor J. S. V. Allen. 
* Deceased December 16, 1946 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Budget and Finance 

Mr. Hesse, Chairman, Mr. Barthold, Mr. Jones, Mr. Palmer 

Executive 

Mr. Porter, Chairman, Dr. Bailey, Mr. Barthold, Mr. Hesse, Dr. McMullen, 
Mr. Mullane, Mr. Palmer, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Wright, Mr. Kirkfatrick, Secretary 

Investment 

Mr. Mullane, Chairman, Mr. Cramblet, Mr. McKinney, Mr. Wright 

Buildings and Grounds 

Mr. Boyd, Chairman, Dr. Bailey, Mr. Mullane, Mr. Patton 

Faculty and Instruction 

Dr. McMullen, Chairman, Mr. Hurl, Mr. Love, Mr. Porter 

Nominations 

Mr. Marshall, Chairman, Dr. McMullen, Mr. Morris, Mr. Wilkin 

Library 

Dr. Renner, Chairman, Mr. Barthold, Mr. Carfer, Mr. Woods 

Student Welfare 

Mr. Adkins, Chairman, Mr. McKinney, Mr. Palmer, Dr. Tilock 

Ministerial Training 

Mr. Fiers, Chairman, Mr. Love, Mr. Phillips, Dr. Renner 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Sidney C. Porter, Chairman 

W. H. Cramblet, President and Treasurer 

N. W. Evans, Secretary 






OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet President of the College 

Bernal Robinson Weimer Dean of the Faculty 

Forrest Hunter Kirkpatrick Dean of Students 

John Gerald Patterson Director of Admissions and Alumni Secretary 

Newton Wallace Evans Bursar 

Edgar Hugh Behymer Librarian 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION* 

Wilbur Haverfield Cramblet, President of the College on the M. M. Cochran 
Foundation. (At Bethany since 1917, president since 1934) 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Jean Corrodi Moos, Professor-Emeritus of Music. 

College of Music, Zurich; Royal Conservatory of Music, Leipzig; A.M., Mus.D., 
Bethany College; Oberlin College; Columbia University. (At Bethany 1897- 
1934) 

Henry Newton Miller, Professor-Emeritus of Bible School Pedagogy on the 
Herbert Moniger Foundation. 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; D.D., Bethany College. (At 
Bethany 19 14—193 7) 

Ebenezer Lee Perry, Professor-Emeritus of Latin. 

A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Yale University; A.M., Columbia University j 
Litt. D., Bethany College. (At Bethany 1 908-1 939) 



Pearl Mahaffey, Professor of Modern Languages. 

A.B., Miami University; University of California; A.M., Columbia University j 
University of Grenoble; McGill University; University of Paris; Harvard Uni- 
versity; National University of Mexico; Litt.D., Bethany College. (At Bethany 
since 1908) 

Andrew Leitch, Sarah B. Cochran Professor of Psychology. 

A.B., A.M., Butler College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; Columbia University; 
University of Chicago; University of Pennsylvania; Harvard University. (At 
Bethany since 1920) 

Bernal Robinson Weimer, Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Biology. 

A.B., A.M., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. (At 
Bethany since 1921) 

Irvin Taylor Green, Professor of New Testament and Church History. 

A.B., Transylvania College; A.M., B.D., Bethany College; University of Chi- 
cago; D.D., Milligan College. (At Bethany since 1921) 

Forrest Hunter Kirkpatrick, Dean of Students and Professor of Education. 

A.B., Bethany College; University of Dijon; A.M., and Prof. Dipl., Columbia 
University; University of Pittsburgh; University of London. (At Bethany since 
1927) 

* The names are arranged in order of rank and seniority of appointment. 



Emmett Ephriam Roberts, Professor of English. 

A.B., Ohio University; A.M., Ohio State University; New York University. (At 
Bethany since 1928) 

Osborne Booth, T. W. Phillip Professor of Old Testament. 

A.B., Hiram College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. 
(At Bethany since 1929) 

John J. Knight, Professor of Physical Education. 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College; University of Michigan; Ohio State 
University. (At Bethany since 1930) 

John Stanley Valentine Allen, Professor of Physics. 

B.S. in E., M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University. (At Bethany since 1933) 

1 Chandler Shaw, George T. Oliver Professor of History. 

A.B., Rollins College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; American 
Academy in Rome; Royal University, Perugia, Italy. (At Bethany since 1935) 

2 Reuben Hamilton Eliassen, Professor of Education. 

A.B., St. Olaf College; University of Minnesota; A.M., Columbia University; 
Stanford University; University of Chicago; Ph.D., Ohio State University. (At 
Bethany since 1936) 

3 Dwight Eshelman Stevenson, Professor of Religion and Philosophy. 

A.B., Bethany College; B.D., Yale University; University of Chicago. (At 
Bethany since 1936) 

Erwin C. Paustian, Professor of Sociology. 

A.B., Central Wesleyan College; A.M., Northwestern University; University 
of Chicago; University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Northwestern University. (At 
Bethany since 1944) 

Harry Lawrence Ice, Director of Ministerial Training and Professor of Religion 
and Philosophy. 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; Ph.D., George Washington University; D.D., 
Bethany College. (At Bethany since 1944) 

Richard Chaffey von Ende, Professor of Music. 

A.B., A.M., Carnegie Institute of Technology; Grove City College; Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh; Pennsylvania State College. (At Bethany since 1945) 

Charles Flemming Brown, Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia University. (At Bethany since 1946) 

Rudolph H. Kyler, Professor of Economics and Business A dministration. 
D.J.U., University of Breslau. (At Bethany since 1946) 



On leave of absence for second semester of 1 947-1 948. 
On leave of absence for first semester of 1947-1948. 
Resigned June 1947. 



*Max Molyneux, Professor of English. 

A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., Cornell University. (At Bethany since 1946) 

Walter Brewster Greenwood, Professor of English. 

A.B., Transylvania College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati. (At Bethany since 1947) 

2 Earl D. McKenzie, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Acting Head 
of the Defartment. 
A.B., Brown University; A.M., Columbia University; University of Frankfurt 
am Main; Yale University; University of Pittsburgh. (At Bethany since 1937) 

1 Margaret Carrigan, Head of Residence for Women and Assistant Professor of 
English. 
A.B., Columbia University; A.M., Syracuse University; Cornell University. (At 
Bethany since 1939) 

Edgar Hugh Behymer, Librarian with rank of Assistant Professor. 

A.B., Indiana University; A.B.L.S., University of Michigan; A.M., University 
of Chicago. (At Bethany since 1941) 

Bradford Tye, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Acting Head of the Defart- 
ment. 
B.S., Alma White College; Rutgers University; M.S., New York University; 
Columbia University. (At Bethany since 1943) 

George K. Hauptfuehrer, Assistant Professor of Music. 

A.B., B.M., Friends University; A.M., University of Kansas; Pittsburgh Musical 
Institute; Juilliard School of Music. (At Bethany since 1945) 

S. Elizabeth Reed, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

A.B., Muskingum College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; University of Wis- 
consin; New York University. (At Bethany since 1945) 

John Gerald Patterson, Director of Admissions and Alumni Secretary with rank of 
Assistant Professor. 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., University of Virginia. (At Bethany since 1946) 

Stuart Wilson McFarland, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration. 
B.S., Ohio University; A.M., Ohio State University; State University of Iowa. 
(At Bethany since 1946) 

Don L. Phillips, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

B.S., Wheaton College; A.M., Purdue University. (At Bethany since 1946) 

3 Carl L. Spicer, Assistant Professor of History. 

B.S., A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University. (At Bethany since 1946) 



1 Resigned June 1947. 

2 On leave of absence for second semester of 1 947-1 948. 

3 Resigned November 1946. 



Glenn L. Bushey, Assistant Professor of History. 

B.S., Shippensburg State Teachers College; A.M., Columbia University j Ed.D., 
Temple University. (At Bethany since 1947) 

Leslie Warren Coughanour, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Bethany College; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (At 
Bethany since 1947) 

Lillian L. Gray, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business A administration. 
A.B., Grove City College 5 A.M., University of Pittsburgh. (At Bethany since 
1947) 

W. Harold Kesselring, Assistant Professor of Biology. 

A.B., North Central College ; University of Chicago; M.S., University of 
Illinois; Cleveland College. (At Bethany since 1947) 

Helen Louise McGuffie, Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., Bethany College; A.M., University of Pittsburgh; Columbia University. 
(At Bethany since 1947) 

, Assistant Professor of Classics and Acting Head of the Department. 

, Assistant Dean of Students with rank of Assistant Professor. 

, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business A dministration. 

, Assistant Professor of English. 



Margaret Roberts Woods, Instructor in Modern Languages. 

A.B., Wellesley College; A.M., Pennsylvania State College; Middlebury Col- 
lege; Columbia University; Colorado College; University of Besangon; Uni- 
versity of San Luis Potosi. (At Bethany since 1943) 

Elizabeth Jean Murphy, Instructor in Biology. 

B.S., Bethany College; M.S., University of New Hampshire. (At Bethany since 
1944) 

2 Daniel Chalmers McLean, Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.S., Tufts College; M.S., Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. (At 
Bethany since 1945) 

James Blair Miller, Minister of Bethany Memorial Church and Instructor in 
Religions Education. 
A.B., Bethany College; B.D., Yale University. (At Bethany since 1945) 

Elizabeth Belt, Assistant to Dean of Students. 

A.B., Bethany College; Columbia University; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh. 
(At Bethany since 1946) 



1 Resigned June 1947. 

2 Resigned July 1947. 



Ellwood Derrick Rushworth, Jr., Instructor in Music. 

B.S., Westminster College; M.Mus.Ed., University of Michigan. (At Bethany 
since 1946) 

Lee Fiess Baldwin (Mrs.), Instructor in Music. 
A.B., Bethany College. (At Bethany since 1947) 

Glen A. Chambers, Instructor in English. 

B.F.A., Drake University; St. Bonaventure College. (At Bethany since 1947) 

^riscilla Allen, Instructor in English for 1946-1047. 

A.B., West Virginia University; A.M., Cornell University. 

Mari Luise Huth, Instructor in Modern Languages for 1046-104-/. 

Leipzig Conservatory; B.S., A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina. 

Cornelia Ladwig, Instructor in Biology for 1946-1947. 

A.B., West Virginia University; M.Ed., Harvard University. 

Ethel F. McLean, Instructor in History for 1046-1047. 
A.B., Adelphi College; A.M., Columbia University. 

Mary Louise Truxal, Instructor in English for 1046-1947. 
A.B., Bethany College; University of New Hampshire. 

Paul McClelland Waddell, Instructor in Mathematics for 1 946-1 947. 

A.B., Bethany College; A.M., Cornell University; Indiana University; Col- 
lege of Wooster. 

Ella Jane Blake, Instructor in Art. 

B.F.A., Tulane University; Louisiana State University. (At Bethany since 1947) 

Jane Ellen Dingledine, Instructor in Education and Counselor for Freshmen. 

A.B., Madison College; A.M., Columbia University. (At Bethany since 1947) 

Rhoda Yelton Greenwood (Mrs.), Instructor in English. 

A.B., Transylvania College; A.M., Wittenburg College; Michigan State College. 
(At Bethany since 1947) 

Catherine Elizabeth Moser, Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S., M.S., University of Pennsylvania. (At Bethany since 1947) 

Margaret Joan Parry, Instructor in Modern Languages. 

A.B., Wells College; A.M., Yale University; Middlebury College. (At Bethany 
since 1947) 

John W. Reid, Instructor in Psychology. 

A.B., Swarthmore College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania. (At Bethany since 
1947) 

Donna Shaver, Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh. (At Bethany since 1947) 



Resigned December 1946. 



Harold G. Sims, Instructor in History. 

A.B., Muskingum College; A.M., Ohio State University; Pennsylvania State 
College. (At Bethany since 1947) 

, Instructor in Biology. 

, Instructor in Modern Languages. 



William Herbert Hanna, Jr., Associate in Physical Education. 
A.B., Bethany College. (At Bethany since 1946) 

Richmond Grenfell Banks, Associate in English for 1946-1047. 
B.Ed., Superior State Teachers College. 

Dorothy Bright Beggs (Mrs.), Associate in Chemistry for 104 6- 1047. 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Jane Land Hudson (Mrs.), Associate in Psychology for 1046-1947. 
A.B., Bethany College. 

Ann Radulovic, Associate in Economics and Business Administration for 1946-1947. 
A.B., Westminster College; Columbia University. 



CRITIC TEACHERS FOR DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
J. W. Alley Virginia Pilchard 

Joseph Churchman Jay M. Potter 

George M. Elliott Geneva Struwing (Mrs.) 

Howard Gist Henrietta Watson 

Jarrett Hamilton Regina Weaver 

Mary Nann Knapp Don Weser 

George N. Wood 



COLLEGE LIBRARY 

Edgar Hugh Behymer Librarian 

A.B., Indiana University ; A.B.L.S., University of Michigan j A.M., University 
of Chicago. 

Charles Penrose Assistant Librarian 

A.B., LL.B., The College of William and Mary in Virginia} A.B.L.S., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Edna Welling Woolery (Mrs.) Associate 

A.B., Bethany College} Columbia University. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

Edgar Wade Mahan, M.D College Physician 

A.B., Bethany College} M.D., University of Maryland. 

Catherine Springer, R.N College Nurse and Superintendent of Infirmary 

Wanda Grafton Mulgrew (Mrs.) R.N Associate Nurse 

R.N Associate Nurse 

STUDENT PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 

Elizabeth Belt Assistant to Dean of Students 

A.B., Bethany College} Columbia University} M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh. 

Jane Ellen Dingledine Counselor for Freshmen 

A.B., Madison College} A.M., Columbia University. 

Assistant Dean of Students 

Alberta Frances Quinlin Recorder 

A.B., Bethany College; Columbia University. 

Ann Radulovic Vocational Counselor 

A.B., Westminster College} Columbia University. 

Betty I. Shaffer Associate 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Supervisors of Residence Halls 
Mary Lee Stanton, Phillips Hall 

Mary Belle Carmen, Zeta Tau Alpha Bess Magee (Mrs.) Phi Mu 
Vira M. Hettler, Gateway Hall Ethel D. Metzner, Kappa Delta 

Grace Hine (Mrs.) Alpha Xi Delta Margaret Wilson (Mrs.) , Point Breeze 



BUSINESS OFFICE 

1 George Carl Hettler Executive Secretary 

A.B., Bethany College 

Harry Milton Myers Bookkeeper 

Dessie Mae Rupe (Mrs.) Bookkeeper 

Louise Stevens Cole (Mrs.) Assistant Bookkeeper 

Madline Polk Siegel (Mrs.) Cashier 

Ruth Elizabeth Clark Secretary 

Clayton E. Benedict Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

James Gribbon Chief Engineer 

Harry O. Wolfe, Jr Manager of Dormitories 



OTHERS ON ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Vina Adams Biard (Mrs.) Assistant to Director of Admissions 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Nancy Cowen Secretary to the President 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Flora Jane Farmer (Mrs.) Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Mary Jane Helfer Secretary to the Dean of Students 

A.B., Bethany College. 

Jean McFadden Assitant Dietitian 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College. 

Constance Patricia Parsons (Mrs.) Secretary to the Dean of the Faculty 

Ruth Sophronia Pelton Dietitian 

Lillian Wilson (Mrs.) Dietitian 

Deceased June 25, 1947. 



COMMITTEES OF FACULTY AND STAFF 

Admissions and Classifications 

Mr. Kirkpatrick, Chairman, Mr. Eliassen, Mr. Leitch, Mr. Weimer 

Athletics and Physical Recreation 

Mr. von Ende, Chairman, Mr. Knight, Mr. Leitch, Mr. Phillips, Miss Reed 

Audio and Visual Aids 

Mr. Eliassen, Chairman, Mr. Allen, Mr. Kesselring, Mr. Rushworth, Mr. Shaw 

Campbell Mansion and College Memorabilia 

Mr. Ice, Chairman, Mr. Behymer, Mr. Evans, Mr. Green, Mr. Shaw 

Chapel 

Mr. Booth, Chairman, Mr. Leitch, Miss Mahaffey, Miss McGuffie, Mr. von Ende 

Gans Award 

Mr. Weimer, Chairman, Mr. Allen, Miss Belt, Mr. Brown, Mr. Bushey 

Honors 

Mr. Weimer, Chairman, Miss McGuffie, Mr. McKenzie, Miss Parry, Mr. Tye 

Lectures and Concerts 

Mr. Behymer, Chairman, Mr. Booth, Miss Radulovic, Mr. Roberts, Mr. von Ende 

Library 

Mr. Weimer, Chairman, Mr. Behymer, Mr. Greenwood, Mr. Kyler, Miss Woods 

Public Relations 

Mr. Patterson, Chairman, Mr. Kirkpatrick, Mr. Knight, Mr. Roberts, Mr. 
Weimer 

Religious Life 

Miss MahafTey, Chairman, Mr. Allen, Mr. Brown, Miss Dingledine, Mr. Miller 

Scholarships and Financial Aids 

Mr. Kirkpatrick, Chairman, Miss Belt, Mr. Cramblet, Mr. Patterson 

Student Activities 

Mr. Paustian, Chairman, Mr. Coughanour, Mr. Haputfuehrer, Mr. Kirkpatrick, 
Miss Reed 



PART II 

ADMISSION 

EXPENSES 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 



ADMISSION 

General Requirements — Only applicants who are well qualified 
to benefit from the type of educational experience and academic life 
available at Bethany College will be admitted. Only students who 
are graduates of first grade high schools or preparatory schools with 
class rank in the upper half should apply. It is expected that all 
applicants will be taking regular academic work as candidates for a 
baccalaureate degree. 

All applicants for admission must furnish evidence of good moral 
character, sound physical and mental health as well as adequate 
scholastic preparation. The Committee on Admissions and Classifica- 
tions will consider the best interests of the applicant and the college 
before final acceptance is made. 

Freshman Admission — Applicants for admission to the freshman 
class will be judged acceptable in terms of scholastic preparation and 
intellectual maturity by any one of the following three plans: 

I. By Certificate 

Applicants from any accredited secondary school may be accepted 
for admission on presentation of statement signed by proper school 
authorities, showing the kind and the amount of scholastic work done, 
provided : 

(a) the scholastic work completed is of such quality as to place the 
student in the upper half of his class as evaluated by the 
secondary school.* Exceptions to this may be made only when 
evidence of considerable validity indicates that the applicant 
has the ability to do good academic work at the college level. 
Such evidence may be scores on scholastic aptitude or mental 
ability tests taken with approval of the Committee on Admis- 
sions and Classifications. 

(b) the student's preparatory program includes at least fifteen ac- 
ceptable units of secondary school work. Students from senior 
high schools may be admitted with eleven units of senior high 
school work.** 

*Note: Applicants with proper academic standing- may be granted acceptance 
at the end of their junior year, subject to completion of their senior year in a 
satisfactory manner. 

**Note: Not less than one-half unit will be accepted in any subject and not 
less than one unit will be accepted in any foreign language, algebra, plane geometry, 
chemistry, physics, or shorthand. 



24 Bethany College Bulletin 

(c) at least two-thirds of the units of secondary school work ac- 
cepted for entrance are in English, foreign languages, mathe- 
matics, natural science and social studies. 

II. By Examination on Subject Matter 

Students who have not been regularly prepared for college in a 
recognized secondary school may apply for admission by making a 
complete statement regarding qualifications and training. Such stu- 
dents can be regularly admitted if they qualify by means of high 
scores made in a battery of examinations on general educational de- 
velopment given at the college under the direction of the Committee 
on Admissions and Classifications. The examinations will be given 
upon the scholastic work covered by the list of secondary units ap- 
proved by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

III. By Cumulative Record 

The Committee on Admissions and Classification will receive cumu- 
lative standard test records and other objective data which may give 
evidence of an applicant's ability to profit by college experience. Such 
records or data should ( i ) cover at least the three most recent years 
of the applicant's school life, (2) provide fairly reliable information 
as to his intellectual capacity, (3) include an accurate record of the 
results of comparable achievement measures in various academic sub- 
jects. Data obtained from all tests will be interpreted in authenticated 
comparable terms, such as well established public school or independ- 
ent school percentiles. 

Advanced Standing — Students from other accredited colleges may 
be admitted upon the presentation of evidence that they have satisfied 
the general requirements for admission and that they were in good 
standing in the institution last attended. All applications for admission 
from students for advanced standing must be accompanied by official 
certificates stating the nature and extent of college courses completed 
and all disciplinary or academic items that belong to such a record. 
Such a statement must be signed by the proper officer of the institu- 
tion where the work was done. 

The evaluation and acceptance by Bethany College of credits earned 
at an accredited institution will depend upon the quality and nature 
of the academic work completed. Academic work ranked below "aver- 



Bethany College Bulletin 25 

age" (grade C) will not be accepted. Not more than sixty-five hours 
will be allowed for junior college work. 

Some academic credit may be allowed for training courses and 
educational experiences in the Armed Services according to the gen- 
eral pattern recommended by "A Guide to the Evaluation of Educa- 
tional Experiences in the Armed Services" issued by the American 
Council on Education, provided such courses or experiences are ap- 
propriately related to a college of liberal arts and sciences. 

Credit will be allowed for work done in non-accredited institutions 
only by special action of the Committee on Admissions and Classifica- 
tions. This Committee may require that the applicant be classified one 
class below that attained in the institution from which the credits were 
presented. 

A student transferring to Bethany cannot be granted a degree unless 
he has been in attendance at the college at least during his senior 
year. 

Effective as of 1945- 1946, all former Bethany College students who 
were in the Armed Services for any length of time and may now be 
classified as Veterans of World War II will be allowed eight semester 
hours of academic credit with record made as follows: 

* Physical Education and Personal Hygiene 8 semester hours 

* granted for service in World War II 

The granting of this credit will automatically relieve all such students 
from taking courses in physical education which are required for the 
baccalaureate degree. 

This credit will be in addition to, and not counted as duplicating, 
courses in physical education which the student may have already 
completed. This credit will not bar him from taking any additional 
courses in physical education and it will not count as satisfying any 
courses in physical education which may be specifically required to 
complete a major in that department. 

Special Students — A very limited number of students who are 
not candidates for a degree may be admitted to the college as "un- 
classified students" with permission to pursue selected courses. Ap- 
proval for enrollment in this manner will be given only if the appli- 
cant can satisfy the Committee on Admissions and Classifications that 
he can pursue the courses with profit, that he has a serious purpose in 
mind, and that he can meet the general requirements as to health, 
character and mental ability. 



26 Bethany College Bulletin 

Medical Requirements — After the candidate's admission the 
parents and family physician will be asked to provide the Dean of 
Students and the College Physician with a medical history adequate 
for the understanding of any problems which may arise. Each candi- 
date must also present evidence of having had a successful smallpox 
vaccination and two injections of tetanus toxoid within a five-year 
period prior to entrance. The college reserves the right at any time 
to require the withdrawal of a student when in its opinion his physical 
or mental condition is such that his interests and those of the college 
would be better served by such withdrawal. 

Advanced Standing by Achievement Tests — Any students who 
have anticipated the subject matter of any of the prescriptions for 
baccalaureate degrees listed under the requirement of hours may make 
application to take an achievement test. If the result of this test indi- 
cates sufficient mastery of the subject the prescription will be waived. 
Passing the achievement tests will not give credit in hours toward 
the degree. The application for an achievement test should be made 
to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications. It should state 
the achievement tests which the student desires to take and the basis 
of his preparation for the test. 

Placement Tests for Freshmen — For purposes of educational 
guidance all freshmen are required to take placement examinations in 
certain academic subjects such as English, history, and foreign lan- 
guages. These examinations are given before the final registration at 
the beginning of the college year in order that failures due to mis- 
placement in courses may be avoided if possible. The type of examina- 
tion used is designed to test the readiness with which the student can 
adapt his knowledge to the requirements of college work. The results 
of these examinations are used to determine a student's placement in 
courses and in sections. 

"Freshman Week" — The college recognizes the need of giving its 
newly entering students some introduction to their work, and for this 
purpose it requires freshmen to come to Bethany two or three days 
before the formal registration of all other students. This "Freshman 
Week" is devoted to efforts to help the freshmen get a proper adjust- 
ment and to allow time for proper evaluation and registration. 

The time designated for "Freshman Week" will be used for the 
following activities: 



Bethany College Bulletin 27 

a. Registration and payment of fees. 

b. Physical examination. 

c. Placement and achievement tests which will enable the faculty 
to place the student in the classes for which he is best fitted. 

d. Getting acquainted with the faculty, staff and equipment of the 
college. 

e. Conferences with the faculty counselor as to educational and 
vocational program. 

Attendance during "Freshman Week" is required of all who will 
enter as freshmen. The dates for the 1 947-1 948 session are Septem- 
ber 14 to 18, 1947. 

Method of Enrollment — All business matters related to the en- 
rollment of new students are in charge of the Director of Admissions. 
The formal Application for Admission, together with the application 
fee of $2.00 should be mailed as early as possible to the Director of 
Admissions. 

The application form requires rather complete data as to the appli- 
cant's personal and educational background together with an official 
record of secondary school work. Personal references will be required 
of all applicants and will be checked by the Director of Admissions. 
The Committee on Admissions and Classifications will review applica- 
tions within four weeks after they are received and notice of action 
taken will be sent directly to the applicant. 

Reservation of Dormitory Rooms — All rooms in college dormi- 
tories must be engaged in advance. Upon acceptance by the Commit- 
tee on Admissions and Classifications, the applicant will be furnished 
the proper room application blank by the Director of Admissions. 

A guarantee and breakage deposit fee of $10.00 must be submitted 
with the room application. In the case of withdrawal — from the dormi- 
tory or from college — after the room reservation has been filed, the 
guarantee and breakage deposit fee is forfeited. An applicant for ad- 
mission who finds that it will be impossible to enter college can 
obtain a refund of this fee if notice is given to the Director of Ad- 
missions in writing at least 90 days prior to Registration Day. 

Plans showing the arrangement of rooms in the dormitories, de- 
tailed statement of prices and reservation blanks may be obtained from 
the Director of Admissions. 



EXPENSES 

Tuition — The tuition for each semester is one hundred and 
seventy-five dollars for fifteen academic hours or less. For each 
academic hour in excess of fifteen, an additional twelve dollars is 
charged. No charge is made for activity courses in physical education 
taken to meet graduation requirements. 

Tuition for special students carrying less than twelve hours is four- 
teen dollars per semester hour. Special fees will be charged as usual in 
such cases. 

By special action of the Board of Trustees, members of families of 
home and foreign missionaries actively in service are allowed free tui- 
tion for regular academic work at the college. 

Admission Fee — A fee of two dollars is required with each Ap- 
plication for Admission. This fee is not refundable. 

Room Deposit Fee — To reserve a room in a college dormitory it 
is necessary for each student to make a breakage and guarantee de- 
posit of ten dollars. The college reserves the right to make legitimate 
charges against this fee for any damage done to the room or to its 
furnishings during the year of occupancy and to declare the forfeiture 
of the deposit if keys are not returned immediately after the room 
is vacated. This fee is not refundable, in any part, if the room applica- 
tion is canceled or the room vacated, regardless of cause, during the 
college year. 

Health, Library and Matriculation Fee — A library, matricu- 
lation and college health service fee of ten dollars each semester is 
charged to all students. 

Student Activities Fee — A student activities fee of ten dollars 
each semester is charged to all students. This fee covers partial ex- 
penses in connection with athletic activities, lectures and concerts, and 
a variety of social and extra-curricular activities directly managed by 
the Student Board of Governors. 

MEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS 

Cochran Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $75.00 per 
semester for each student. Rooms are set up for occupancy by one or 
two students. 

Point Breeze — The rent for rooms in this hall is $75.00 per 



Bethany College Bulletin 29 

semester for each student. Rooms are set up for occupancy by two or 
three students. 

Supplemental Dormitories — The F.P.H.A. has furnished tem- 
porary dormitory housing for students attending the college and 
eligible for education and training under Public Law 16 or Public 
Law 346. These buildings are arranged in suites with accommoda- 
tions for four men in each suite. These facilities are operated with 
rates and management plan approved by the F.P.H.A. 

Young men rooming in any college dormitories are expected to 
furnish their own bed linen, blankets, pillow, towels, study lamps, 
rugs, dresser covers, window curtains and bedspreads. They are ex- 
pected to care for their own rooms. 



WOMEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS 

Phillips Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $75.00 per 
semester for each student. Rooms are set up for occupancy by one, 
two or three students. 

Gateway Hall — The rent for rooms in this hall is $75.00 per 
semester for each student. Rooms are set up for occupancy by one or 
two students. 

Dormitory Houses — These buildings include Helwig House, 
Colonial House, Shady Lawn and such other dwelling houses as 
may be available. 

Rooms in certain of these houses are reserved for young women 
affiliated with sorority groups. They are rented by the individual 
student who signs a rental contract for her room under the same con- 
ditions which apply in other residence halls, but the sorority group 
is responsible for providing a minimum number of occupants. If this 
number is not provided, the group can be charged a monthly rental 
to take care of the loss of income to the college. 

The rent for rooms in these houses is $70.00 per student when 
operated as a dormitory by the college. When the house is occupied 
by a sorority group, the rent is $65.00 per student. Single and double 
rooms are available. 

Young women rooming in any of the college dormitories are ex- 
pectedj:o furnish window curtains, bed linen, bedspreads, blankets, 
pillow, towels, study lamps and rugs. They are expected to care for 
their own rooms. 



30 Bethany College Bulletin 

REGULATIONS FOR RESIDENCE HALLS 

Permission for the installation of radios and special electrical equip- 
ment in any of the halls must be obtained from the Manager of Dormi- 
tories and a charge may be assessed for such items. 

Room assignments in all college dormitories are made for the 
academic year. For freshmen, they are made in the order of applica- 
tion j for upperclassmen, in the order of class membership, supple- 
mented by the drawing of lots. Any request for a change of assignment 
must be approved by the officer in charge and a new contract issued. 
Preference is given to upperclassmen only for a limited time. 

Residence halls will be open for freshmen for each semester the 
day before Freshman Week and for all other students the day before 
registration. Residence halls will be closed and students are not ex- 
pected to stay in Bethany when college is not in session. 

Bethany College reserves all rights in connection with the assign- 
ment, termination of occupancy and reassignment of rooms in all 
dormitories. 

BOARD 

All students in residence at the college are expected to board at 
college dining halls. Young women will board at Phillips Hall. Young 
men will board at the Bethany House. The price of board is figured 
at the rate of $10.00 per week. The price of board is subject to revision 
at any time to conform to change in general price levels. 

Permission will not be granted for students to board outside of 
college dining halls for any period of time, and board will be billed on 
the basis of the full semester. 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR SEMESTER 

Tuition $175.00 

Room in College Dormitory $65.00 to $75.00 

Board at College Dining Hall ($10.00 per week) $170.00 

Student Activities Fee $10.00 

Health, Library and Matriculation Fee $10.00 

Total required fees for semester $430.00 to $440.00 

To the above costs must be added fees for special courses, the cost 
of books, clothing, laundry, travel and personal spending money. The 
cost of books for the college year (two semesters) averages $40.00 to 



Bethany College Bulletin 31 

$60.00. The other items are not unusual but will be determined by the 
individual student. 

The college is required to collect the West Virginia Sales Tax of 
2 per cent on room and board in addition to published charges for the 
same. 

MISCELLANEOUS FEES 

Admission Fee for all new students $2.00 

(This fee must be paid before any action is taken on Application for 
Admission.) 

Freshman Week Fee. (First semester only) $10.00 

(Freshman Evaluation and Orientation Program, etc.) 

LABORATORY AND COURSE FEES 

Art Not determined 

Biology 11,12, 36, 48, 53, 54, 57, 65, 67, 68, 76, 

78 $8.00 per semester 

Biology 34 $6.00 per semester 

Biology 91, 92 (each hour) $8.00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 15, 16, 31, 67, 68 $8.00 per semester 

Chemistry 32, 34, 61, 62 $12.00 per semester 

Chemistry 91, 92 (each hour) $8.00 per semester 

Education 72 $5.00 per semester 

Education 81, 82 $20.00 per semester 

Mathematics 21, 22, 23, 24 $5.00 per semester 

Physics 21, 31, 32, 25, 36, 53, 54, 63, 67, 68, 69 . .$5-00 per semester 

Physics 91, 92 (each hour) $5.00 per semester 

Psychology 53, 54, 62, 64 $5.00 per semester 

Speech and Dramatics 55, 71, 72 $2.00 per semester 

MUSIC FEES 

Private Lessons, two lessons a week, per semester $55.00 

Private Lessons, one lesson a week, per semester $30.00 

Organ Practice, one hour each day, per semester $20.00 

Piano Practice, one hour each day, per semester $5-00 

Piano Practice, three hours per week, per semester $3-00 

Practice Room for instrumental music, one hour each day, 

per semester .' $2.00 



32 Bethany College Bulletin 

OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Advance Enrollment Fee for each semester $25.00 

(This amount will be applied on the student's account for the following 

semester) 

Auditing a course, per semester hour $5.00 

Comprehensive Examination (For students not in residence 

or for special examination) $25.00 

Each academic hour when less than twelve, per semester .... $14.00 

Each change in registration after first two weeks '. . . $1 .00 

Graduation and diploma fee $10.00 

Infirmary charge per day (after four days) $2.00 

Late registration, first three days, per day $2.00 

Guidance and advisement service (pre-college) $10.00 

Special examinations in any department or course $2.00 

Special placement or achievement test in any department .... $2.00 
Transcript fee (after first issue) $1.00 

BREAKAGE AND GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 

Certain fees are charged to cover cost of materials placed in the 
hands of students or as a guarantee of proper performance of duties 
assigned. Unused balances of these fees are refunded at the end of the 
college year. 

Biology 34 $5.00 per semester 

Biology 53, 54 $3-00 per semester 

Chemistry 11, 12, 15, 16, 31, 75, 76, 91, 92 ... .$3.00 per semester 

Chemistry 32, 34 $6.00 per semester 

Chemistry 61, 62, 67, 68 $7.00 per semester 

Chemistry 77, 78 (travel) $10.00 per semester 

Depost on lock in gymnasium $1 .00 

Guarantee deposit for student employment $5.00 

NOTE: A deposit on locker keys is charged to all students en- 
rolling in activity courses in physical education or to those reserving 
lockers in the gymnasium for personal use. 

SUMMER TERM EXPENSES 

Tuition for courses taken during the summer terms of the college 
will be charged at the rate of fourteen dollars per credit hour. 
Charges for required and special fees will be determined in the light of 



Bethany College Bulletin 33 

services available to the individual student. Board and room will be 
determined on the basis of time the student is in residence at the rate 
of $14.00 per week. The West Virginia Sales Tax of 2 per cent must 
be collected on room and board. 

PAYMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Tuition, room rent, board, student fees, health and matriculation 
fees, and other special fees are due and payable on Registration Day 
of each semester. All accounts are payable to the Bursar of Bethany 
College. 

Upon request, a period of two weeks after the opening of the semester 
may be allowed for the payment of the student's account as listed on 
the invoice. It is required in each case, however, that the student shall 
make a minimum cash payment of at least $50.00 on the Registration 
Day of each semester. Students are not considered to be properly 
enrolled any semester until this minimum payment has been made. 
Scholarship awards or other grants cannot apply on the required mini- 
mum payment. In case the student's account is less than $50, full 
payment of the same is required in advance. 

All student accounts must be paid in full within two weeks after 
Registration Day or satisfactory arrangements for the same must be 
on file in the Bursar's Office. 

When a student's account is not paid in full on Registration Day, 
the same is charged with an additional 10% carrying charge added to 
the total. This carrying charge is cancelled on such part of the account 
as is cared for within the two weeks period. After that day, this charge 
becomes part of the regular account and must be settled for under 
terms stated below. 

Upon request, arrangements may be made to care for the student's 
account by monthly payments. The charge for this service through the 
Tuition Plan, Inc. is 4% of total amount deferred. When arrange- 
ments are to be made to take care of the student account by deferred 
payments, application for the same must be signed in the Bursar's Office 
before or at the time of registration. Plan of deferred payment should 
be indicated at this time. This application must state the student's 
willingness to sign a note to cover the balance due to the college. These 
notes must be signed by the student and endorsed by the parents or 
guardian. These are drawn so that the installments will fall due on 
the fifteenth of each month in amounts agreed upon in connection 



34 Bethany College Bulletin 

with the approval of the application for deferred payment. These notes, 
properly executed, must be in the Bursar's Office before the end of the 
period of two weeks allowed for the settlement of accounts. 

No student will be allowed to take final examinations or to receive 
academic credit of any kind in any semester until all his financial 
obligations to the college have been met. In case a student withdraws 
from college, all charges except certain special fees are refunded on 
a pro rata basis, figured to the end of the week in which the withdrawal 
takes place. Scholarship awards are not applied on the accounts of stu- 
dents who withdraw before the end of the semester. 

Freshmen will register Monday, September 16, 1947, and "Fresh- 
man Week" fee is payable on this day at the Bursar's Office. The 
"Freshman Week" fee covers board and room for the days of this week 
that are given over to freshman orientation and academic placement 
activities. 

Students certified under Public Law 16 or Public Law 346 are 
required to make provision for the minimum cash payment of $50.00 
on Registration Day of each semester if they are living in college 
dormitories and taking their meals in college dining halls. This will 
be credited as an advance payment for room and board. Additional 
payments are required each month for the succeeding month. 

Any veterans of World War II who are admitted to the college 
without Certificates of Eligibility and Entitlement from the Veterans 
Administration are required to make the same financial arrangements 
as all other students. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AIDS 



Bethany College can provide financial aid through scholarships, 
loans and employment for a limited number of deserving students of 
insufficient means. All such assistance is administered by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Financial Aids after consultation with the 
Dean of Students and the Director of Admissions. 

Candidates for admission to the freshman class who wish to apply 
for financial aid should make such application in writing to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions before June fifteenth of the calendar year of en- 
trance. All applications from new students must be accompanied by 
a transcript of secondary school work and the required Application for 
Admission and Admission Fee. 

Upperclassmen who require scholarship help or who wish to have 
scholarship awards continued should make an application in writing 
to the Dean of Students at least four weeks before the end of the 
academic year. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarship awards are of five kinds: Alumni Regional, Competitive 
Examination, Honor, Trustee and Ministerial Aid. Scholarship funds 
and other forms of financial aid are for the benefit of qualified stu- 
dents whose families cannot provide the full cost of a college educa- 
tion. Only students in need of financial aid should apply. The Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Financial Aids awards scholarships on the 
basis of academic accomplishments, character, personality and com- 
munity service. 

The yearly stipends that go with each scholarship award are applied 
on the tuition charge on the basis of one-half for the first semester and 
one-half for the second semester. 

Students will be eligible to receive only one award. Students quali- 
fying for more than one must select the award which they prefer to 
accept. Scholarships are awarded to freshmen on a four-year basis 
subject to review and re-evaluation each year. 

The student who wishes his scholarship award continued beyond the 
freshman year must make written application to the Dean of Students 
at least four weeks before the end of the academic year. It is expected 
that the applicant shall have met the following conditions: 

i. His scholarship index must be above 1.50 in the academic year 
preceding the application. 

2. His financial obligations to the college must be met promptly. 



36 Bethany College Bulletin 

3. His influence on the student body should be in every sense 
wholesome. 

4. His continuance in college should depend upon the need for 
some financial assistance. 

5. He shall have made a worth-while contribution to the life of 
the college and the college program. 

It is understood that the following reasons will operate to cancel 
any particular scholarship award: 

1. Failure to maintain a scholarship index of 1.50. 

2. Serious academic censure for any cause. 

3. Unsatisfactory conduct. 

4. Withdrawal from college. 

Alumni Regional Scholarships — Alumni Regional scholarships 
are awarded to freshmen of unusual ability upon recommendation of 
alumni groups in various districts. These scholarship awards are for 
the amount of $600 applicable on the tuition account of the student 
at the rate of $75 per semester for four years. 

To be eligible for any one of these awards, the student must come 
from the upper quarter of his high school or preparatory school gradu- 
ating class, he must have demonstrated interest in extra-curricular ac- 
tivities by active participation, he must be well recommended by re- 
sponsible secondary school officers and he must have the endorsement 
of five alumni of Bethany College in his area. The recipients of these 
scholarships are subject to all the general rules governing scholarships. 

Competitive Examination Scholarships — Early in the spring 
the college holds a competitive scholarship examination for high 
school seniors, and scholarships are awarded to students making top 
scores on the examination. A number of scholarships of $1,000 to be 
applied on tuition at the rate of $125 each semester for four years are 
awarded to those making highest scores. The next ranking students 
will receive $600 to be applied on tuition at the rate of $75 each semes- 
ter for four years. The recipients of these scholarships are subject to all 
the general rules governing scholarships. 

Honor Scholarships — A limited number of scholarships are 
awarded to entering freshman students who rank in the highest 
honor group of their secondary school graduating class. These pro- 
vide a stipend of $300 to be applied on tuition at the rate of $37.50 
per semester for four years. The award will be continued beyond the 
freshman year only if the student re-applies for it and the Committee 
finds that he has met all requirements under the general rules govern- 
ing scholarships. 



Bethany College Bulletin 37 

Trustee Scholarships — A limited number of scholarships of 
varying amounts are awarded to entering freshmen and upperclass- 
men who would not be able to attend college without such financial 
help. The recipients of these scholarships must have completed satis- 
factory academic work for the year preceding application. These 
scholarships are awarded for a period of one year. 

Designated Scholarships — The following scholarships have been 
especially designated by friends of the college and are part of the total 
resources available for financial aid to students : 

Mary A. Morrison Scholarship — This is a scholarship covering 
three-fourth of the cost of tuition. 

Isaacs Mills Scholarship — The scholarship covers a part of the 
tuition charge, the benefits of which are to be received by a ministerial 
student. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship — This scholarship of $100 per semester 
applies on tuition. The student receiving the benefits of the same is to 
be nominated by a member of the Willett family. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship — This scholarship covers $30 on tuition 
cost per semester. 

Albert C. Israel Scholarship — This scholarship yields $20 per 
semester to apply on tuition of a descendant of Albert C. Israel. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship — The income from this scholar- 
ship fund is awarded for the purpose of helping students who are 
preparing for the mission field or the ministry. The students who re- 
ceive the benefits of this scholarship are to be nominated by the donor. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship — The income from this scholarship 
fund is awarded to students who have reached the senior year in their 
college course. The students receiving benefits from this scholarship 
are to be nominated by the Dean of Students. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship — A scholarship endowed in memory 
of Mr. Herbert Moninger, a graduate of the college. 

Josiah Wilson Scholarship — As a memorial to Josiah N. and 
Wilmina S. Wilson and Nora B. Wilson a scholarship fund was 
established by Josiah N. Wilson. The income is used to aid some 
student or students who are preparing for the Christian ministry. 

The John H. and Ida H. King Scholarship Fund — The income 
from this scholarship fund is awarded to students at Bethany College 
under terms approved by the Trustees of the college in accordance 
with the will of the donors. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarships — Scholarships covering a part of the 
tuition charge. The students who receive the benefits of these scholar- 



38 Bethany College Bulletin 

ships are to be nominated by the President of the College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Awards — The income from a fund of $8,000 
set up by the will of Mrs. Minnie W. Schaefer of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, to 
be awarded to students planning for definite Christian service. 

J. T. Smith Awards — The income from a fund of $17,500 estab- 
lished by J. T. Smith of Memphis, Tennessee, to be made available 
for students preparing for the Christian ministry or some other form 
of Christian service. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship Fund — The in- 
come from a fund of $20,000 set up by the will of Clarinda Pendle- 
ton Lamar, in memory of her father, William Kimbrough Pendleton, 
member of the first faculty and second president of the college ( 1 866- 
1889), is to be awarded in one or more scholarships each year to one 
or more citizens of West Virginia. These awards may be in the form 
of loans or outright gifts as determined by the Committee on Finan- 
cial Aids. 

The Gans Fund Awards — Awards are made in this fund to juniors 
and seniors at Bethany College and to graduates of Bethany College 
engaged in study and research elsewhere who have shown "evidence 
of merit and promise in the field of science." Funds so awarded will be 
available for approved study and research in some specific field. 

Rhodes Scholarships — Men who have completed their sopho- 
more year at Bethany College are eligible to compete for the Cecil 
Rhodes Scholarship, tenable for three years at Oxford University, 
England. These scholarships are awarded on the combined basis of 
character, scholarship, athletic ability, and leadership in extra-curricu- 
lar activities. Further information may be obtained from the Dean 
of Students. 

Foreign Exchange Fellowships — Each year at least two stu- 
dents direct from foreign countries come to Bethany to study on 
fellowships provided by the college administration. These students 
come to interpret their own people and their national culture to 
American student life. These awards are made only to students who 
are recommended by the Institute of International Education. 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

Bethany College Loan Funds — Loans from the Bethany Col- 
lege Funds may be obtained by students on complying with the con- 
ditions governing the same. Approved security is required from all 



Bethany College Bulletin 39 

those borrowing from the fund. These loans are without interest while 
the student is in Bethany College and notes are drawn to mature 
four months after graduation or withdrawal from college. All notes 
bear interest from the date of their maturity. 

Applications for loans must be made to the Committee on Financial 
Aids. All financial obligations to the college including notes to the 
loan fund must be paid before an official transcript of the student's 
academic record can be issued. 

Student Employment — Limited opportunities for students to 
earn money for college expenses are afforded, but under no circum- 
stances is it possible for a student to earn all of his expenses. The 
college may not be able to provide student employment of any kind 
beyond $ 1 50 as a total for one year. 

Applications for student employment must be filed on a proper 
form and must be accompanied by a deposit of $5.00 as a guarantee of 
faithful performance. A careful study of the student's needs and gen- 
eral welfare will be made by the committee caring for student employ- 
ment as each application is considered. Applications for student em- 
ployment should be filed with the Dean of Students or the Vocational 
Counselor. 

Prospective students should not consider beginning a college career 
unless adequate financial arrangements have been made for at least 
the first year. A few students may find it possible to earn enough 
money to pay a considerable part of their expenses. It is advisable, 
however, for new students to adapt themselves academically before 
attempting outside work. 

PLACEMENT 

The Vocational Counselor is concerned with placement service and 
his facilities are available for students and prospective employers. It 
assists students needing to secure part-time employment while attend- 
ing college and those who need to find summer work; it helps mem- 
bers of the graduating class who are seeking their first positions or 
making applications for graduate fellowships j and it gives as much 
assistance as possible to alumni on request. The office does not under- 
take to find employment for anyone or to assume the responsibility 
for making all contacts with prospective employers. 



GRADUATION AND HONORS 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Degrees — Bethany College confers, at formal graduation exer- 
cises, upon students who have satisfied all appropriate requirements 
and have maintained high standards of character the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. 

Requirement of Hours — Candidates for either of the bacca- 
laureate degrees are required to complete a total of 126 semester 
hours of academic work for graduation. Of this number, forty 
semester hours must be in courses in the upper division and six semes- 
ter hours must be in physical education. Only twelve hours in ap- 
plied music or art can be used toward meeting the minimum require- 
ment. 

Distribution Requirement — Candidates for graduation are re- 
quired to complete course work in several of the major departments 
of the college. Such courses have been designated by the faculty as 
representing an introduction to "general education." 

The following specific course requirements must be met by all 
candidates for the baccalaureate degree: 

English composition or literature 6 hours 

Foreign language 

A reading knowledge of one of the foreign lan- 
guages offered at the college or approved by the 
Committee on Admissions and Classifications. This 
requirement may be satisfied by the completion of 
the second year course in the language at the college 
level j or by written and oral examination given un- 
der the direction of the Department of Modern 
Language or the Department of Classics. 

Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, or Physics 6 hours 

Biblical Literature, i.e., courses in Old and New 

Testament 6 hours 

History, Political Science, Economics, or Sociology . .6 hours 

Psychology, Philosophy, or Education 6 hours 

Physical Education, i.e., two hours in personal hygiene 

and four hours in activities courses 6 hours 



Bethany College Bulletin 41 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must present at 
least forty semester hours from courses taken in Biology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics or Physics. Of these forty semester hours, at least 
twenty-five of them must be in the upper division. 

Requirement of Quality Points — Quality points, awarded on 
the basis of final grades received, are required for graduation. At 
least 126 quality points must be earned and of these at least forty 
must be earned in upper division courses. 

Requirement of Major — The department in which a student 
elects to major shall determine specific requirements for the student, 
not only of work to be done in the major department, but courses to 
be completed in other departments to buttress the major. The gen- 
eral outline of requirements for each major is listed in the section of 
this bulletin that carries Courses of Instruction. With the approval of 
the Dean of the Faculty certain modifications can be made to meet 
the needs of the individual student. 

It is expected that no major will include less than 24 semester 
hours and that at least 12 semester hours in the major field must be 
completed in the courses in the upper division. At least 24 quality points 
must be earned in the major department. These represent the minimum 
for the college. The department offering the major may require more 
than this minimum. In all cases it is expected that the student will com- 
plete a large part of his major work in the junior and senior years. 

The major is usually confined to work in a single department, but 
related departments may offer "functional majors" embracing work 
in two or three departments, if the work is planned and administered 
as "an integrated unit." 

Requirement of Minor — In addition to the major each student 
must elect a minor subject. The professor in charge of the major 
subject should approve the minor selected. In most cases it should 
have some relationship to the major. At least 18 semester hours must 
be completed in the minor. A minimum of 1 8 quality points is required 
in the minor. 

Requirement of Examination — A comprehensive examination — 
both written and oral — is required of each candidate for a degree at 
Bethany College. This examination is given under the direction of the 
professor in charge of the major subject with the assistance of a faculty 
committee appointed by the Dean of the Faculty. It is intended to 
cover the total range of material and accomplishment for an under- 



42 Bethany College Bulletin 

graduate major. A student failing in the comprehensive examination 
shall be considered as failing to meet the requirements for gradua- 
tion and shall not be graduated. 

Seniors who pass the comprehensive examination with high credit 
shall be awarded their degrees "with distinction" in the major subject. 
The only other grades given are "passed" and "failed." 

Comprehensive examinations are given once each academic year. 
Students who fail to pass the comprehensive examination shall, upon 
payment of a suitable fee, be given a second opportunity only at the 
end of any subsequent year, provided reasonable notice has been given 
to the Committee on Admissions and Classifications and the depart- 
ment head. Further opportunity to take this examination shall be 
given only by special vote of the faculty. Students desiring to take 
senior comprehensive examinations in a second major field may do 
so provided the head of the department concerned and the Dean of 
the Faculty approve, and that the student shall have paid the fee 
required for a special comprehensive examination. 

Residence Requirement — Four years are usually required to 
satisfy the requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Students of 
superior quality may satisfy the requirements in less time. The senior 
year should be spent in residence at the college. 

HONORS 

Graduation Honors — Students who have done college work of 
unusual merit and have given evidence of superior academic achieve- 
ment in the upper division will be graduated with honors. These are 
awarded with the degree as Summa Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude 
and Cum Laude. The awarding of honors is determined upon the 
basis of total quality points earned, standing in the comprehensive 
examination and the recommendation of the professor in charge of the 
student's major department. 

Students who give evidence of superior achievement in the major 
subject and are able to pass the comprehensive examination with ex- 
cellent results will be designated as "passed with distinction." 

Class Honors — Upper division students of the college who com- 
plete the academic work of any one year with a scholarship index of 
2.5 are recognized for "First Honors" for the year, and those who 
complete the academic work of any one year with a scholarship index 
of 2.25 are recognized for "Second Honors" for the year. Lower 



Bethany College Bulletin 43 

division students of the college who complete the academic work of 
any one year with a scholarship index of 2.25 are recognized for "First 
Honors" for the year, and those who complete the academic work of 
any year with a point average of 2.0 are recognized for "Second 
Honors" for the year. 

Deans' List — At the end of each semester a list of students who 
have ranked high in academic attainments as attested by scholarship 
index are designated for the Deans' List. This distinction is deter- 
mined by the Dean of the Faculty and the Dean of Students. 

Senior Fellowships — Certain members of the junior class are 
sometimes designated as Senior Fellows during the following year. 
The selection is made only of students who have attained unusual 
excellence in the field of their major study and who, by character and 
ability, can do special work in a major department, as an assistant in 
some phase of instruction or research. The Senior Fellowship carries a 
small stipend. No more than six senior fellowships are awarded in 
any one year. 

The selection of Senior Fellows is made by the Committee on 
Honors from the nominations of the department head. It is intended 
that each Senior Fellow shall be given the fullest freedom to pursue 
the intellectual life and he shall have the benefit of tutorial instruc- 
tion in the department in which he works. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa — This honorary scholastic fraternity was 
organized at Bethany College in 1932. Students are eligible for mem- 
bership under the following conditions: maintenance of a scholarship 
index of 2.25 for four consecutive semesters, provided that in no 
semester their scholarship index falls below an average of 2.0 j and 
further, students must be recommended by the faculty Committee 
on Honors. 

Pi Gamma Mu — The West Virginia Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma 
Mu is located at Bethany. Its members are selected from students who 
have maintained a high scholarship index in at least twenty semester 
hours of social studies. 

Pi Delta Epsilon — Established here in May of 1947, Pi Delta 
Epsilon, National Journalism Fraternity, is the newest addition to the 
roster of honorary organizations on the Bethany campus. Its prime 
purpose is the perpetuation of efficient student publications on campus 
and the advancement of journalism as a major factor in campus extra- 
curricular life. 



44 Bethany College Bulletin 

Anna Ruth Bourne Award — A silver cup has been given the 
college by an anonymous donor to be known as the Anna Ruth 
Bourne Scholarship cup. This cup is awarded to the women's social 
group on the campus earning the highest scholarship standing each 
semester. The group winning the large cup for four consecutive 
semesters is presented with a smaller cup which is a replica of the 
large cup. 

Pittsburgh College Club Award — The Pittsburgh College 
Club, which comprises the college alumnae of Pittsburgh, has set up 
an award which is made each year to the outstanding young woman in 
the junior class. This award is based on academic record, qualities of 
leadership, character, conduct and general standing on the campus. The 
club has placed a suitable plaque in Phillips Hall on which the names 
of the winners are engraved. In addition, an individual award is made 
each year to the junior girl chosen. 



PART III 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 

Courses of instruction are listed by subject matter fields 

In numbering of courses first semester courses have odd numbers 
and second semester course, even numbers. A course having both an 
odd and even number, as 11-12, runs continuously throughout the 
year, but may be elected for either semester unless the course is specifi- 
cally designated <( a continuous course" providing proper prerequisites 
are met. In registering for a course through the year, the odd num- 
ber is used the first semester, and the even, the second semester. 

A limited number of courses in various departments will be offered 
during the summer term. The specific courses to be offered in the 
summer term of 1947 will be announced in a special bulletin. 

The number in parentheses after the name of the course indicates 
the academic credit given for each semester. 

The curriculum of the college recognizes the lower and upper di- 
visions in the arrangement of courses and the numbers of each course. 
The lower division covers, roughly, the freshman and sophomore 
years and the upper division, the junior and seniors years. Courses in 
the lower division are numbered from 1 1 to 49, and in the upper 
division from 50 to 100. 

A course may not be offered, if elected by less than five students. 



ART 

Miss Ella Jane Blake 
11-12. Principles and Practice. (3 hrs.) 

A study of simple forms, their arrangement and their representation in line. Problems 
of color harmony, and composition. Experimental work in tempera. A studio course 
with assigned readings. 

15. Figure Drawing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of figure drawing for compositional purposes. Work is done in pen and ink, 
pencil and wash. One hour of assigned reading weekly. Registration with permission 
of the instructor. 

16. Charcoal Drawing. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the head and figure from the living model. Emphasis on structure in line and 
mass. Registration with permission of the instructor. 

21-22. Creative Expression in Applied Arts. (2 hrs.) 

A hobby course in handicrafts to develop skill and ingenuity in converting a great 
variety of simple materials into useful objects. 

31-32. Painting. (3 hrs.) 

Aims to develop the creative imagination of the student and to help him become 
more sensitive to beauty of color relationships, tone and composition; subjects include 
still life and landscape; water color and oils. Prerequisite, Art 11-12. Not offered 
in 1947-1948. 

41-42. Introduction to Art. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the historical styles of architecture, sculpture and painting of Egypt, 
Greece, Rome and Europe followed by a study of problems of criticism and judg- 
ment in evaluating art forms. 

51. Art in the Renaissance. (3 hrs.) 

The character of the Renaissance movement and its early development. Stress is laid 
on the great personalities in architecture, sculpture, and especially in painting, on 
men whose production essentially forms and expresses the period in art. Not offered 
in 1947-1948. 

52. Art in the Twentieth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Historical and interpretative discussion of architecture, sculpture, and painting from 
1905 to the present. The correlation of parallel developments in these arts is brought 
out and the significance of contemporary art as a product of contemporary civilization 
is considered. As a background, the late nineteenth century is reviewed. Not offered 
in 1947-1948. 



48 Bethany College Bulletin 

BIOLOGY 

Professor B. R. Weimer 
Head of the Department 
Aims: 

The courses are intended to acquaint the student with the living- world around 
him and the fundamental dynamic life processes; to demonstrate scientific 
methods of approach to problem solutions; to cultivate an attitude of inquiry 
and research; to develop laboratory skill in various types of work in zoology, 
botany and related fields; and to train students as teachers of biology and for 
certain professional work related to this field. 

Students who plan to teach or become professional biologists should elect the 
following sequence of courses: Biology 11-12, 36, 43, 48, 53, 57, 65, 67 or 68, 
78 and 87. 

Students preparing- for work in medicine, dentistry, nursing or as laboratory 
technicians should elect the following- sequence of courses: Biology 11-12, 36, 
43, 53> 76, 78 and 87. 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four semester hours in the department following- a sequence of 
courses approved by the head of the department. A minimum of twelve semester 
hours of chemistry, at least six of which are organic chemistry, is desirable, and 
a minor should be elected in a laboratory science. Either German or French should 
be elected to meet the graduation requirement for foreign languag-es. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen semester hours in the department exclusive of Biology 34 and 85. 

11-12. General Biology. (3 hrs.) 

Systematic study of the fundamental structures and life processes of plants and 
animals including man, and their important inter-relationships. Required for all pre- 
medical students. Note: The satisfactory completion of the first semester of this course 
may be substituted for Physical Education 15 or 16. 

34. Our Outdoors, (i hr.) 

A general survey course in the field of man's natural environment from the stand- 
point of geology and biology. Estimated cost of the course to the student exclusive 
of tuition, including field trips, food and incidentals: $5.00 to $8.00. Enrollment 
limited to fifteen. Not open to freshmen. 

36. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. (4 hrs.) 

Study of the comparative anatomy of the representative forms of vertebrates. Lab- 
oratory study of the comparative anatomy of the shark, Necturus and cat. Prereq- 
uisite, Biology 11— 12. Required of all pre-medical students. 



Bethany College Bulletin 49 

43. Heredity and Eugenics. (2 hrs.) 

A general course covering modern theories and laws of heredity and their relation 
to man. 

48. Plant Ecology and Local Flora. (2 hrs.) 

The identification of the common seed plants and ferns by the use of manuals and the 
study of the relation between plants and their environment. Prerequisite, Biology 
11— 12 or a course in biology at secondary school level. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

53. Bacteriology. (3 hrs.) 

Morphology and physiology of yeasts and bacteria $ principles of laboratory technique, 
cultural characteristics and environmental influences on bacterial growth. 

54. Industrial Bacteriology and Clinical Methods. (3 hrs.) 

A practical laboratory course with occasional lectures, dealing with the bacteriology 
of water and milk, and the general food bacteriology. Some study of the elementary 
techniques in clinical methods such as blood work and urine analysis. 

57. Advanced General Botany. (3 hrs.) 

An advanced study of the structural relationships of various type forms of the plant 
kingdom together with a study of the fundamental life processes of plants: growth, 
irritability, food synthesis and metabolism. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. Not offered 
in 1 947-1 948. 

65. Invertebrate Zoology. (3 hrs.) 

Survey of the invertebrate animals including phylogeny and morphology. A labora- 
tory study of representative forms of invertebrates will be made. Prerequisite, Biology 
11-12. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

67 or 68. Physiology. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the structure and functions of the human body and the mechanism of 
bodily movements, responses, reactions and various physiological states. Prerequisites, 
Biology 11— 12 and 36. 

76. Histology. (3 hrs.) 

Structure of the cell and its modification into various tissues. Special attention will 
be paid to the theory and practice of general histological technique. Prerequisites, 
Biology 11— 12 and 36. 

78. Vertebrate Embryology. (4 hrs.) 

Nature and development of the tissues and organs in vertebrates. Embryos of chick and 
pig are studied in the laboratory. Prerequisites, Biology n— 12 and 36. 



50 Bethany College Bulletin 

8 i or 82. Marine Biology. (4 to 6 hrs.) 

Credit is given for summer courses taken at the Marine Biological Station at Woods 
Hole, Massachusetts, or at any other station of similar rank. 

85. Methods and Materials in Teaching Biology. (2 hrs.) 

The aims and methods of teaching biology in the secondary schools. Special attention 
will be given to general laboratory procedure and technique. Prerequisite, sixteen 
hours in the department and upper division rank. 

87. Contemporary Biological Investigations and Literature. 
(ihr.) 

A survey of the fields of biological investigations and the current literature relating 
to investigations in those fields. Prerequisites, Biology 11-12 and 36. Open only to 
upper division students. Required of all biology majors. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

A course in theoretical and advanced morphological biology. The problem may be 
selected by the student, subject to the approval of the head of the department accord- 
ing to interest and future needs and may be in either: 

a. Advanced comparative anatomy of vertebrate or invertebrate types not pre- 
viously studied; or 

b. Review of the literature relating to various fields of investigation in biology; or 

c. Study of some problem in biological research. 

Prerequisites, Biology n— 12, 36 and 65 or 78 with superior achievement in these 
courses. Open only to upper division students majoring in the department. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor Charles F. Brown 
Head of the Department 

Aims: 

To contribute to the student's general culture, his understanding of the nature 
of the physical world and his understanding of the place of chemistry in in- 
dustrial and business life; to provide training in the scientific method of reason- 
ing; and to provide major students with a thorough and practical training in 
chemistry which may be useful in industrial, technical or educational work. 

Students who plan to become professional chemists should elect the following 
sequence of courses: Chemistry 15—16, 31-32, 61—62, 67-68 and 75—76; Physics 
31—32; Mathematics 11-12, 31—32; English 11— 12 and a minimum of sixteen 
hours in the humanities above other required courses. German or French is an 
accepted language. 



Bethany College Bulletin 51 

Requirement for Major: 

At least twenty-four semester hours in the department following- a sequence of 
courses approved by the head of the department. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least eighteen hours in the department. 

11-12. General Chemistry. (4hrs.) 

Designed to give a general knowledge of the chemical sciences. For those students 
desiring only an introduction to chemistry. Not recommended for students intending* 
to take further courses in chemistry. A continuous course. 

15-16. General Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A first course in chemistry conforming to American Chemical Society standards. 
Prerequisite to all other chemistry courses. A continuous course. Prerequisite, two 
units of mathematics or concurrently with Mathematics 11-12. 

31. Qualitative Analysis. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in qualitative analysis for professional chemists and engineers. 
Prerequisites, Chemistry 11-12 or 15-16 and Mathematics 11— 12. 

32. Quantitative Analysis. (5 hrs.) 

A standard course in quantitative analysis for professional chemists and engineers. 
Chemistry 31 should precede this course whenever possible. Prerequisites, Chemistry 
15-16 and Mathematics 11-12. 

34. Quantitative Analysis. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in quantitative analysis designed for pre-medical students and 
those curricula requiring only four semester hours of quantitative analysis. Lecture 
material is equivalent to that in Chemistry 32. Prerequisites, Chemistry 11— 12 or 
15—16 and Mathematics 11— 12. 

61-62. Introductory Organic Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A standard course in organic chemistry. The laboratory work consists of preparations 
and an introduction to organic qualitative analysis. A continuous course. Prerequisites, 
Chemistry 15-16, 31 or 32 or 34. 

67-68. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

Designed to present advanced material not given in Chemistry 61-62. Required of 
professional chemists and engineers. Enrollment limited to advanced students and 
with permission of the head of the department. Prerequisite, Chemistry 61-62. 



52 Bethany College Bulletin 

71. Elementary Physical Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A brief introduction to selected areas of physical chemistry for pre-medical students. 
Three lecture-recitations and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, Chemistry 
15—16, 31 or 32 or 34. 

75-76. Physical Chemistry. (4 or 5 hrs.) 

A standard course in physical chemistry for professional chemists and engineers. A 
continuous course. Prerequisites, Chemistry 31—32, 61—62, Physics 31—32 and Mathe- 
matics 31—32. 

77-78. Industrial Chemistry. (4 hrs.) 

A course designed to teach the unit operations of selected industries. Theory and 
practice will be taught by lecture and laboratory, supplemented by selected field 
trips to various industrial plants. Prerequisites, Chemistry 15—16 and 61-62. 

85. Methods and Materials in Teaching Chemistry. (2 hrs.) 

The aims and methods of teaching chemistry in the secondary schools. Special atten- 
tion will be given to general laboratory procedure and technique. Prerequisite, sixteen 
hours of chemistry and junior or senior rank. 

87. Literature of Chemistry, (i hr.) 

Bibliographic, biographic and historical problems for library research. Prerequisites, 
Chemistry 31, 32 or 34 and 61—62. 

91-92. Problems. (1 or 2 hrs.) 

Independent laboratory investigation of an original nature for seniors who have 
superior achievement and are majoring in the department. 

CLASSICS 



Head of the Department 
Aims: 

To develop the ability to read classical Greek and Latin literature with some 
degree of fluency and appreciation; to understand the influence of Greek and 
Latin on modern thought and expression; to prepare students for the teaching 
of Latin, ministerial students for the study of the New Testament; and to provide 
background materials for the student who is interested in linguistics or archaeol- 
ogy. 

Requirement for Major: 

Twenty-four hours in the department with a sequence of twenty hours in either 
Greek or Latin. Students who expect to teach Latin will find Greek very im- 



Bethany College Bulletin 53 

portant in their undergraduate courses and practically indispensable for any 
graduate study of the language. History 65, Philosophy 53-54 and Art 41-42 
are strongly recommended for all students majoring in this department. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen hours with the sequence of courses approved by the head of the de- 
partment. History 65 is recommended. 

Greek 
11-12. Beginner's Greek. (3 hrs.) 

Reading in the language is combined throughout with the learning of forms and 
vocabulary. The aim of the course is to produce as quickly as possible an ability 
to read Greek. 

31-32. New Testament Greek. (3 hrs.) 

The Gospel of Luke and the grammar of the Greek New Testament. In the second 
semester some Pauline Epistles will be studied. Prerequisite, Greek 11-12. 

51. Plato. (3 hrs.) 

The Afology, the Crito and selections from other Dialogues will be read. Open to 
those who have offered two units of Greek at entrance or have passed Greek n— 12. 

52. Homer. (3 hrs.) 

Selections from the Iliad will be read. Open to those who have offered two units of 
Greek at entrance or have passed Greek n— 12. 

61-62. Greek Tragedy. (3 hrs.) 

Selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Prerequisite, Greek 31—32. 
Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

71-72. Greek Literature in English Translation. (3 hrs.) 

No knowledge of the original language is required. In the first semester, the epic 
(Homer) and tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides) will be studied as manifesta- 
tions of the Greek creative genius. In the second semester, comedy (Aristophanes), 
the development of the critical attitude (Plato, Aristotle, Longinus) and individualism 
(Theocritus, Lucian) will be studied. Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 

Latin 
11-12. Beginner's Latin. (3 hrs.) 

This course is designed to enable students to acquire an ability to read the language 
as quickly as possible. The learning of forms and vocabulary is combined through- 
out with reading in Latin. 



54 Bethany College Bulletin 

31. Vergil. (3 hrs.) 

The Aeneid i Books I-VIj supplementary reading in English on Vergil's poetic tech- 
nique and on the mythological background of the Aeneid. Open to those who have 
offered two or three units of Latin at entrance or have passed Latin 11-12. 

32. Sallust and Ovid. (3 hrs.) 

The Catiline and selections from the Metamorphoses will be read. Open to those 
who have offered two or three units of Latin at entrance or have passed Latin 11— 12. 

51. Cicero's De Amicitia and De Senectute. (3 hrs.) 

Essays on Friendship and Old Age show a Roman's effort to interpret two universal 
human experiences. Prerequisite, Latin 31—32 or equivalent. 

52. Tacitus. (3 hrs.) 

Germania and Agricola will be read with study of style and interpretation. Prereq- 
uisite, Latin 51. 

61. Cicero's Letters. (3 hrs.) 

A number of Cicero's letters will be read showing Cicero's tastes and relations to 
personal and literary friends. Prerequisite, Latin 31—32. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

62. Horace. (3 hrs.) 

This course will include the reading of Odes and Efodes with selections from the 
Satires. Prerequisite, Latin 31—32. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

63-64. Latin Composition. (2 hrs.) 

A thorough review of forms and syntax. A course in the writing of Latin especially 
intended for students who expect to teach the subject. Prerequisite, Latin 51—52 or 
61—62. Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 

73. Roman Literature in English Translation. (3 hrs.) 

No knowledge of the original language is required. Drama (Plautus, Terence, 
Seneca), poetry (Lucretius, Vergil, Horace) and the De Officiis of Cicero will be 
studied as manifestations of the Roman creative spirit. 

74. Roman Law. (3 hrs.) 

The historical development of Roman Law and its influence on modern legal sys- 
tems. Particular attention will be given to the fundamental principles of Roman 
Private Law. The use of the Latin language is not required. Not offered in 1947— 
1948. 

85. Methods and Materials in Teaching Latin. (2 hrs.) 

Special methods in the teaching of Latin for those who are preparing to teach at the 



Bethany College Bulletin $5 

secondary school level. Open only to students majoring- or minoring in the subject. 
Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Subjects, hours and credits for special study in the classics to be arranged in- 
dividually with the instructor. Open only to upper division students majoring in the 
department. Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor R. H. Kyler 
Head of the Department 

Aims: 

The courses are intended to provide all students with the background necessary 
for a better understanding and appreciation of current economic and social 
problems and to prepare them for intelligent citizenship; to train students 
effectively for responsible positions in the world of business; to lay a thorough 
foundation for graduate study and teaching in the field. A knowledge of the 
fundamentals of economics is a valuable part of a liberal education, particularly 
for those who are interested in becoming ministers, social workers, lawyers, 
diplomats or government officers. 

Requirement for Major: 

Thirty semester hours in the department following a sequence of courses ap- 
proved by the head of the department. Fifteen semester hours of the major 
should be in upper division courses. 

Students who plan to concentrate in economics must complete the following 
courses: Economics 43—44, 45, 47 or 48 plus six courses in the upper division. 
Students who plan to concentrate in business administration must complete 
the following courses: Economics 43-44, 45-46, 47 or 48 plus five courses 
in the upper division. 

Students who plan to do graduate work in economics are advised to obtain a 
reading knowledge of French and German. 

Students who plan to do graduate work in business administration are advised to 
concentrate in economics and to limit the number of specialized courses in ap- 
plied economics. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Eighteen semester hours in the department including Economics 43-44, 45, 47 
or 48 plus two courses approved by the head of the department. 



56 Bethany College Bulletin 

25 or 26. American Economic History. (3 hrs.) 

An introductory course for beginning students of economics, intended to provide the 
necessary historical background of present economic and business conditions with 
special emphasis on the economic development of the United States. Open to freshmen. 

27 or 28. Business Organization and Management. (3 hrs.) 

An introductory course for beginning students of business administration. It is in- 
tended to give a survey of the general field of business including production, market- 
ing, retailing, salesmanship, personnel administration, insurance, corporation finance, 
taxation and banking. Open to freshmen. 

43-44. Principles of Economics. (3 hrs.) 

The well-established fundamentals of economics are presented and discussed in such 
a way as to make them clearly understandable to the average student. Their ap- 
plication to economic, social and political conditions of today is stressed with the 
purpose of giving the student the approach to an intelligent outlook on current 
problems. A continuous course. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division 
courses in this department. Not open to freshmen. 

45-46. Introduction to Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Principles and methods of accounting for different types of business organizations. 
This course is an indispensable foundation for general business training. A continuous 
course. Not open to freshmen. 

47 or 48. Business Statistics. (3 hrs.) 

Statistical principles and their practical application in the administration of modern 
business. Nature, collection and organization of data; presentation of data in tabular 
and graphic form; the various averages, measures of dispersion; construction and 
use of index numbers. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

51. Principles of Marketing and Distribution. (3 hrs.) 

The marketing function of the manufacturer, wholesaler, jobber, retailer, mail-order 
house, chain store and other marketing institutions; cost of distribution; problems of 
marketing management and planning; modern trends in marketing. Prerequisites, 
Economics 43—44 and 45. 

52. Retailing. (3 hrs.) 

Purchasing, receiving and pricing merchandise with emphasis on the retail store 
and other retail establishments. Stock control, sales promotion, retail personnel, credit 
and collection, retail advertising and accounting survey. Prerequisites, Economics 
43-44 and 51. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

54. Salesmanship. (3 hrs.) 

A presentation of current sales principles and practices with a preparation of the 



Bethany College Bulletin 57 

sales talk, the use of the sales portfolio, analysis of demand and a study of the 
personal characteristics of the successful salesman. Prerequisites, Economics 43-44 
and 51. 

55 or 56. Insurance Principles and Practices. (3 hrs.) 

A course providing- extensive information about the principles and practices of the 
more important forms of insurance 5 the study of individual coverages or of individual 
departments of insurance work with an appreciation of their importance and of 
their inter-relationships. Prerequisites, Economics 43—44 and 45. Not offered in 
1947-1948. 

57. Corporation Finance. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the corporation and its development and place in modern industry with 
a survey of the principles and phenomena which rise out of the acquisition and utili- 
zation of capital for business purposes. Prerequisites, Economics 43—44 and 45. 

58. Business Law. (3 hrs.) 

The basic principles of American business law and their application to concrete 
situations. The study of the law as a necessary instrument for the businessman. Modern 
trends in business law. Problems from actual controversies are used. Prerequisites, 
Economics 43—44 and 45. 

61. Money, Credit and Banking. (3 hrs.) 

The principles of monetary and banking theory as they exist at present and a survey 
of banking practices. Intended to give a thorough understanding of contemporary 
money, credit and banking problems. Prerequisites, Economics 43—44 and 45. 

63. Public Finance and Taxation. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the principles of government finance combined with a thorough study 
of the Federal tax system. Prerequisites, Economics 43-44 and 45. 

65. Labor Problems. (3 hrs.) (Personnel Administration 65) 

A study of the position of the wage earner in modern industrial society. Organiza- 
tional policies, methods and objectives of organized labor. Problems related to sub- 
standard workers} wages and income } quest for security 5 social and economic objectives 
of industrial democracy. Prerequisite, Economics 43—44. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

66. Personnel Management. (3 hrs.) (Personnel Administra- 
tion 66) 

Procedures, activities and evaluation of personnel management and industrial relations 
in business and industry. Selection and placement} job analysis and evaluation; train- 
ing and promotion} job satisfaction} wage theory and procedures} manpower utili- 
zation} labor-management relations. This course presupposes some knowledge of 
psychology and statistical method. 



58 Bethany College Bulletin 

67. Government and Labor. (3 hrs.) (Personnel Administration 

67) 

Study of permissible ambit of collective bargaining; regulatory and protective legisla- 
tion affecting labor. Legislative and judicial appreciation of the economic, social and 
political problems involved. Reading and independent study. Prerequisite Economics 
43-44 and preferably Economics 6$. 

69-70. Intermediate Accounting. (3 hrs.) 

Theory and practice of valuation of assets and liabilities. Inventories, consignments, 
installment sales, investments, funds, reserves and related accounting problems. Analysis 
and interpretation of financial statements. A continuous course. Prerequisites, Eco- 
nomics 43-44 and 45-46. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

71 or 72. Business Cycles. (3 hrs.) 

The nature of business fluctuations, theories of their causes and proposals for their 
control are analyzed and discussed. Prerequisites, Economics 43—44, 47 or 48 and 61. 

73 or 74. History of Economic Thought. (3 hrs.) 

Outstanding writers and their ideas are studied in relation to the conditions that led 
to important changes and developments in economic thinking. Current trends of 
thought. Primarily for seniors who concentrate in economics. Registration with per- 
mission of the head of the department. 

83 or 84. Seminar in Economics and Business Administration. 
(3 hrs.) 

An original study of some special economic or business problem is made with the 
purpose of developing in the student the analytical technique necessary for graduate 
studies or a business career. Particular attention is given to the needs and interests 
of individual students. Primarily for seniors who major in this department. Registra- 
tion with permission of the head of the department. 



EDUCATION 

Professor R. H. Eliassen 
Head of the Department 
Aims: 

This department seeks to develop in all students a wholesome and intelligent 
attitude toward public education; to cultivate thinking about problems in edu- 
cation ; to integrate its work with that of other departments in a well-rounded 
liberal and professional education of prospective teachers who may qualify for 
teaching in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and other neighboring states j 
and to offer some technical preparation for guidance work. 



Bethany College Bulletin 59 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in the department, with a sequence of courses 
approved by the head of the department and at least six hours in psychology. 

Requirement for Minor: 

Twenty hours in the department, with a sequence of courses approved by the 
head of the department. 

Teacher Training: 

Students who are interested in teaching- should confer with the head of the 
Department of Education as early as possible, preferably during the freshman 
year and not later than the beginning of the upper division work. 

31-32. Human Growth and Development. (3 hrs.) 

An orientation course in developing an understanding of individual and group de- 
velopment through childhood and adolescence. The second half of the course is a 
study of the nature and direction of learning in accord with principles of child 
development. This course satisfies the certification requirements for orientation and 
educational psychology. 

51. History and Philosophy of Education. (3 hrs.) 

A general survey of educational theory and practice from the days of Ancient Greece 
to the present day. The pivotal aim of the course is to secure an understanding of 
contemporary education through a survey of the thinking of great leaders of educa- 
tion, past and present. Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 

52. Principles of Secondary Education. (3 hrs.) 

Social and economic principles that govern secondary education in America. Current 
issues and trends receive emphasis. Observation periods in secondary schools are 
required. 

57. Human Adjustment. (3 hrs.) (Psychology 57) 

A study of the phenomena of personality with special attention to the psychology 
of adjustment — basic human drives, factors affecting personality formation, adequate 
and inadequate personality adjustments, the development of a wholesome personality, 
mental hygiene. Prerequisite, Psychology 31—32. 

61. Educational Psychology. (3 hrs.) (Psychology 61) 

A study of the nature and laws of learning; original nature as conditioning learning; 
the amount, rate, limit and permanence of improvement; factors and conditions 
affecting learning; transfer of training; mental fatigue; individual differences; 
efficient methods of study. Prerequisite, Psychology 31—32. 



60 Bethany College Bulletin 

62. Measurement of Intelligence. (3 hrs.) (Psychology 62) 

A study of the more important techniques for the measurement of intelligence. His- 
torical background, validation and use of intelligence tests in education and in out- 
of-school agencies. Laboratory work with individual and group tests. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 31-32. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

6$. Visual and Auditory Education. (2 hrs.) 

Special methods and materials of visual and auditory techniques in the learning 
process, including motion pictures and radio. Laboratory experience with both visual 
and auditory equipment. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

66. Educational and Vocational Guidance. £2 hrs.) 

General introduction to functions and procedures related to educational and voca- 
tional guidance. Records, tests, inventories, occupational information and counsel- 
ing. Some attention to group procedures and administration of guidance in schools. 

71. Statistical Methods. (2 hrs.) (Psychology 71) 

Analysis and description of psychological, educational and sociological data by means 
of statistical constants which measure central tendency, dispersion and simple correla- 
tion. Some attention to graphic methods, normal curve and experimental design. 

72. Educational Measurements. (2 hrs.) 

Techniques for the measurement and evaluation of educational competence and 
development. Construction, validation, use and interpretation of standard measure- 
ments and their relation to the educative process. 

81 or 82. Observation and Directed Teaching. (6 hrs.) 

Observations, teaching and participation activities in the public secondary schools. 
Includes a study of the role of the principal and teachers in the administration of 
the high schools. Students should not register for more than sixteen semester hours 
of work during the semester in which this course is carried. Offered each semester. 

85 or 86. Special Methods in Teaching. (2 or 3 hrs.) 

See courses offered in several departments, viz.: 

Biology 85 Modern Languages 85 

Chemistry 85 Music 85 and 86 

Classics 85 (Latin) Physical Education 85 

English 86 Physics 85 

Mathematics 85 or 86 Religious Education 86 

91 or 92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Independent study and investigation in the field of professional education. Open only 
to upper division students of unusual ability and adequate background in the field 
of education. 



Bethany College Bulletin 6i 



ENGLISH 

Professor Walter B. Greenwood 
Head of the Department 
Aims: 

This department is intended to furnish students with a comprehensive knowledge 
of the English language and literature as a cultural discipline or as a prepara- 
tion for creative writing and graduate study $ to provide background and some 
technical training for students preparing for professional writing or journalism 5 
and to train students to speak properly and effectively in public. 

Requirement for Major: 

Students who plan to teach English, to prepare for graduate study or to acquire 
a comprehensive knowledge of the English language and literature should elect 
English 31—32 and a minimum of eighteen hours in literature courses in the 
upper division. Students planning to enter graduate schools should elect English 
55 and 56. A reading knowledge of Latin is recommended for majors. History 
69, Philosophy 53—54 and Greek 71—72 are also recommended. 

Requirement for Minor: 

For students electing a minor-, at least eighteen hours in English literature. 
English 31—32 must be included. 

For students electing a minor in Speech and Dramatics, at least eighteen hours 
of courses approved by the head of the department. English 31—32 must be in- 
cluded. 

Composition 
11-12. Composition and Literature. (3 hrs.) 

First semester emphasizes fundamentals of composition with writing in various forms 
and review of grammar. Second semester places greater emphasis on content and style 
in composition with instruction in the technique of preparing a research paper. Vo- 
cabulary study. Selected readings and conference work. 

Literature 
31-32. Backgrounds of English Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A comparative study of some of the masterpieces of the western world which are 
closest to our cultural and intellectual heritage. 

51-52. Amercan Literature. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of American literature as an aspect of American culture, as a development 
of thought in America and in relation to the life and literature of the western world. 
Special emphasis on Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Whitman and Mark Twain. 



62 Bethany College Bulletin 

55. Chaucer and Middle English. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of Middle English literature. Special study of the Canterbury Tales and 
some of the minor poems which reveal the development of Chaucer's skill. 

56. Growth and Structure of the English Language. (3 hrs.) 

The course will deal historically with the language, its early grammar, its foreign 
borrowings. Readings from the poetry and prose of the old English period. Not 
offered in 1947— 1948. 

57-58. Shakespeare. (3 hrs.) 

Principal plays of Shakespeare. Four plays will be studied closely each semester; nine 
or ten others will be read more rapidly. 

59. The Renaissance. (3 hrs.) 

Non-dramatic literature of the English Renaissance will be studied. Prerequisite, 
English 31-32. Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 

60. The Seventeenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

From Donne and the metaphysical poets through the age of Dryden. Prose and poetry 
will be studied with special empasis on Milton. Prerequisite, English 31-32. Not 
offered in 1947— 1948. 

61-62. The Eighteenth Century. (3 hrs.) 

Interpretation of the literature and social life of the eighteenth century. Emphasis on 
Defoe, Steele and Addison, Pope, Swift, Johnson and his circle. Drama: Congreve 
through Sheridan. Poetry: Collins and Gray through Blake. Novels: Selected from 
Richardson, Fielding, Sterne and Jane Austen. Prerequisite, English 31-32. Not of- 
fered in 1947— 1948. 

64. The Romantic Period. (3 hrs.) 

The poetry of the romantic movement from 1785 to 1832. Emphasis on Coleridge, 
Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley and Keats. Prerequisite, English 31—32. 

65-66. Victorian Literature. (3 hrs.) 

First semester: the poetry and prose of the Victorian age with emphasis on Carlyle, 
Tennyson and Arnold. Second semester: a study of Browning, Morris, Swinburne and 
Hardy. Prerequisite, English 31-32. 

69-70. Contemporary Literature. (3 hrs.) 

Poetry, novel and drama. Drama: Ibsen through Odets. Poetry: Bridges through Mac- 
Leish. Novel : James through Cather. Prerequisite, six semester hours in English litera- 
ture or permission of the head of the department. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 



Bethany College Bulletin 63 

83-84. Seminar in English Literature. (1 or 2 hrs.) 

A course for advanced students majoring- in English. Extensive reading for purpose 
of correlating and supplementing work done in other courses. 

86. Methods and Materials in Teaching English. (2 hrs.) 

Analysis and discussion of methods and materials of instruction that have been used 
most effectively in the teaching of English literature and composition in secondary 
schools. It is urged that this course be taken in the junior year. 

91-92. Problems, (i or 2 hrs.) 

Conferences, papers and reports on minor research problems. Limited to seniors of 
superior achievement who are majoring in English. 



Speech and Dramatics 

41. Foundations of Speech. (3 hrs.) 

An introductory survey course to the speech arts with emphasis on voice and diction, 
phonetics, voice science, speech organization and delivery. 

42. Public Speaking and Debate. (3 hrs.) 

Practical application of the principles of speech. Study of speech construction, practice 
in formal and extemporaneous speaking, debate and discussion. Prerequisite, Speech 
41 or permission of the instructor. 

53-54. Play Production. (3 hrs.) 

A course designed to promote an understanding and appreciation of the theatre through 
the learning of techniques in acting and theatre crafts, costume, make-up, stage light- 
ing, scenery design and construction. Students participate in the preparation of college 
dramatic productions. 

55. Oral Interpretation. (3 hrs.) 

A study of techniques of oral reading. Consideration of monologues, stories, ballads, 
lyrics and dramatic poetry and prose. Principles of analysis, empathy, attention, 
imagery. Prerequisite, Speech 41 or permission of the instructor. Not offered in 1947— 
1948. 

56. Argument. (3 hrs.) 

Study of the principles of logic and psychology which underlie the art of persuasion, 
followed by practice in application of the theories developed. Prerequisite, Speech 
41—42 or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to twenty students. Not 
offered in 1947— 1948. 



64 Bethany College Bulletin 

71—72. Introduction to Radio Speech and Drama. (3 hrs.) 

Study and practice of broadcasting methods: microphone speaking - , announcing-, radio 
acting", script and continuity writing - , program building- and directing-. Prerequisite, 
Speech 41. Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 



GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

34. Economic Geography. (3 hrs.) 

Study of world production and distribution of food supplies, power, resources and 
raw materials for manufacture with reference to the natural and economic determining 
factors. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

35. Principles of Geography. (3 hrs.) 

A discussion of the general principles of the science including such topics as earth 
origins and the results of the dynamic geographical agencies tending to change its 
surface. Practical work in mineralogy, physiography and stratigraphy is required 
during the course. 

36. Historical Geology. (3 hrs.) 

The history of the earth as revealed by its strata. Laboratory and field study of the 
common fossils and local formations. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Chandler Shaw 
Head of the Department 
Aims: 

The courses in history endeavor to present the origin and development of insti- 
tutions and ideas to point out the great traditions that are molding our thought 
and action today. Through the study of the civilizations of the past the student 
is expected to gain a better perspective of our own political, economic and social 
structure and to be more aware of the nature and needs of contemporary life. 
The courses in political science are intended to acquaint the student with the 
political institutions and political problems in the United States and the world 
today. Work in the department is particularly recommended for those preparing 
to enter law, government service, teaching and other professions. 

Requirement for Major: 

Not less than twelve semester hours in European history, twelve semester hours 
in American history and six hours in political science, chosen with the consent of 
the head of the department. 



Bethany College Bulletin 65 

Requirement for Minor: 

Not less than eighteen hours approved by the head of the department. At least 
six hours must be in the upper division. A minor may be chosen in history, in 
political science or a combination of both. 

European and World History 
11. History of Western Culture. (3 hrs.) 

The political and cultural contributions of the peoples who have formed the great 
Western traditions from ancient times to the eve of the French Revolution. The course 
attempts to point out the enduring features of the institutions, ideals and achievements 
of the past, especially as they throw light on an understanding of our own culture. 

14. Twentieth Century Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

Following a rapid survey of world developments after 1870, the course deals with 
the causes and results of the twentieth century wars, organizations and movements to 
promote peace and good will, selected political, economic and social problems of the 
1 940's, and some of the currents and cross currents of the civilization of our own day. 

31. World Biography. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the lives and times of certain men and women from antiquity to the 
eighteenth century. Each character is chosen as a representative of some movement or 
contribution in the history of civilization. 

51. Modern European History I. (3 hrs.) 

The political and cultural history of Europe from 1789 to 1870, including the de- 
velopment of science, industry and modern thought. 

52. Modern European History II. (3 hrs.) 

Europe since 1870 with development of the immediate background of our present-day 
civilization. 

54. History of the Far East. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the history and civilization of China, Japan, Korea, India, Burma, 
Thailand, French Indo-China, the Philippines and Indonesia. Not offered in 1947— 
1948. 

65. Ancient Civilization. (3 hrs.) 

The development of civilization in the Near East, Greece and Rome. 

69. The History of England. (3 hrs.) 

A history of English institutions and the English people from the ninth to the early 
twentieth centuries. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 



66 Bethany College Bulletin 

76. Contemporary World History. (3 hrs.) 

The outstanding international events since 1931, the background and causes of the 
Second World War, the diplomacy of the war and the problems of the United Na- 
tions, the making of peace and the post-war period. 

91-92. Problems. (1 or 2 hrs.) 

Special topics for independent study by advanced students majoring in history. 

American History 
34. West Virginia History. (2 or 3 hrs.) 

Following a review of the early history of the Western sections of Virginia, the course 
deals with the formation and development of the new state. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

41-42. United States History. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of political and social history from the period of exploration to the present 
time. 

6^. Twentieth Century American History. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the dynamic events of the past half century. 

71. Colonial America. (3 hrs.) 

A study of political, economic and social conditions in the American colonies from 
early colonial days to 1789. 

72. Latin America. (3 hrs.) 

A survey of the history and culture of the peoples of Central and South America. 

77. Personalities in American History. (3 hrs.) 

The lives and contributions, political, economic and social, of outstanding personalities 
in American history, 1789— 1876. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

78. The Age of Big Business. (3 hrs.) 

Traces the development of our complex industrial system with its resulting social, 
economic and political problems since the 1870's. Biography is stressed. Not offered 
in 1947— 1948. 

Political Science 
55-56. American Government and Politics. (3 hrs.) 

The structure, functions and problems of government — national, state and local. 

62. European and Asiatic Governments. (3 hrs.) 

Deals largely with the political systems of Great Britain, France, Italy, Russia, China, 
Japan and India. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 



Bethany College Bulletin 67 

67. Government and Labor. (3 hrs.) (Personnel Administra- 
tion 67) 

Study of permissible ambit of collective bargaining; regulatory and protective legis- 
lation affecting labor. Legislative and judicial appreciation of the economic, social 
and political problems involved. Reading and independent study. Prerequisite, Eco- 
nomics 43—44 and preferably Personnel Administration 6$. 

73. Backgrounds of American Democracy. (3 hrs.) 

Origin and development of Old World ideologies and institutions which have molded 
or affected American democracy. Not offered in 1 947-1 948. 

79. World Problems of the Atomic Age. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the development of the clashing ideas, ideologies and aspirations that lead 
to national, racial, social and industrial strife. 



JOURNALISM 
Professor E. E. Roberts 



Aims: 



This department is intended to provide background and some technical training 
for students preparing for professional writing or journalism. At the same time 
the courses are specially designed to meet the requirements of the leading graduate 
schools of journalism. 

Requirement for Major: 

Students who plan to prepare for journalism, professional writing, graduate study 
or teaching in journalism should elect the following sequence of courses: Jour- 
nalism 53 and 54 and twelve additional semester hours in journalism j English 
31—32 and six additional hours in English literature. 

Requirement for Minor: 

At least twelve hours in journalism and English 31—32. 

53. Reporting. (3 hrs.) 

A study of techniques and values in news reporting and writing. Emphasis on learn- 
ing to write clearly, forcefully and distinctively. Writing of daily news stories, weekly 
features and all types of newscopy. 

54. Journalistic Types. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the essay, satire, short story, feature, biography and magazine article with 
written work concentrated upon one type to be selected by the student. 



68 Bethany College Bulletin 

63. Features. (3 hrs.) 

The writing- of twenty special features for magazines and trade journals, and the 
submission of at least ten articles for publication. 

64. Advanced Features. (3 hrs.) 

A study of the magazine writing- field with the submission of twenty approved articles. 
Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

6$. Advertising. (3 hrs.) 

A study of department store, financial and business advertising- prog-rams. Buying 
motives, sales appeals, copywriting, economic aspects, research media and production. 

66. History of American Journalism. (3 hrs.) 

Journalistic backgrounds, followed by the development of American newspapers and 
magazines from colonial days to the present. A parallel study of the rise of advertis- 
ing*. Present day trends of news dissemination. 

71. Radio and Play Writing. (3 hrs.) 

A study of modern plays and radio scripts. Objectives include development and speed 
in writing and smoothness of style 5 learning to plan, prepare and edit reliable, news- 
worthy and interesting broadcasts. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

72. Contemporary Reporting Problems. (3 hrs.) 

A study of reporting in specialized fields such as labor news, science and business news. 
Some study of government news releases, techniques and publicity methods and prob- 
lems of large corporations. Not offered in 1947— 1948. 

74. Short Story. (3 hrs.) 

A study of narration and characterization as related to the writing of fiction, and 
the writing of twenty short stories to be approved by the instructor. 

91-92. Problems, (i, 2 or 3 hrs.) 

Advanced writing projects for senior students of marked ability and interest in the 
field of journalism. Registration with permission of the head of the department. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 
Professor E. Hugh Behymer 
21. Introduction to Librarianship. (3 hrs.) 

A general introductory course planned to give an overview of the field of librarian- 
ship, to study library development and to suggest opportunities for service which the 
library profession offers. 



Bethany College Bulletin 69 

52. Library Technique. (3 hrs.) 

A laboratory course planned to familiarize the prospective library school student with 
the kind of work and the type of problems undertaken in the professional library 
schools. Library organization and routines will be studied. Prerequisite, Library 
Science 21. 

MATHEMATICS 



Professor Bradford Tye 
Acting Head of the Department 



Aims: 



The courses in mathematics are designed to give the prospective teacher an 
understanding and appreciation of the fundamental ideas of elementary mathe- 
matics; to provide the general student with a knowledge of the mathematical 
foundation of our civilization; to provide a tool for the technical student; and 
to give the prospective graduate student a proper foundation for later study 
and research. 

Requirement for Major: 

A minimum of twenty-four hours in mathematics, including Mathematics 31—32, 
and at least twelve upper division hours. The upper division courses should 
include Mathematics 53—54. Students interested in science and engineering should 
elect Mathematics 71 and 72. Students interested in mathematics as a teaching 
subject should elect Mathematics 55 and 56. Two courses in the department 
should be taken in the senior year. 

Requirement for Minor: 

A minimum of eighteen hours in mathematics, including Mathematics 31—32 
and six hours in upper division courses. 

11. Mathematical Analysis. (3 hrs,) 

Plane trigonometry, logarithms and the slide rule, linear and quadratic equations, 
analytical geometry of the straight line, determinants. 

Students ranking low in the mathematics achievement test for freshmen will be 
required to make up their deficiency in mathematics by attending a special laboratory 
section. 

12. Mathematical Analysis. (3 hrs.) 

Progressions, binomial theorem, theory of equations, DeMoivre's theorem, mathe- 
matical induction, permutations and combinations, the analytical geometry of second 
degree curves, applications of ana